If this be error and upon me proved, I never writ, nor no man ever loved. These lines are an example of?

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    SONNET

    Let me not to the marriage of true minds

    Admit impediments. Love is not love

    Which alters when it alteration finds,

    Or bends with the remover to remove:

    O no! it is an ever-fixed mark

    That looks on tempests and is never shaken;

    It is the star to every wandering bark,

    Whose worth's unknown, although his height be taken.

    Love's not Time's fool, though rosy lips and cheeks

    Within his bending sickle's compass come:

    Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks,

    But bears it out even to the edge of doom.

    If this be error and upon me proved,

    I never writ, nor no man ever loved.

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  • 1 decade ago

    These two lines, the last two of Shakespeare's Sonnet 116, are an example of his writing style called iambic pentameter. You can tell from the rhyme scheme. The whole sonnet uses personification (e.g. "Love . . . which alters", "that looks on tempests", etc.), a literary technique that ascribes personhood to nonhuman things or qualities.

    Let me not to the marriage of true minds

    admit impediments. Love is not love

    which alters when it alteration finds,

    or bends with the remover to remove.

    O no! It is an ever-fixèd mark

    that looks on tempests and is never shaken.

    It is the star to every wandering barque

    whose worth's unknown although his height be taken.

    Love's not Time's fool. Though rosy lips and cheeks

    within his bending sickle's compass come,

    Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks,

    But bears it out even to the edge of doom.

    If this be error and upon me proved,

    I never writ, nor no man ever loved.

    See if this helps, and have a great day!

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  • 1 decade ago

    Couplet.

    The term sonnet signifies a poem of fourteen lines following a strict rhyme scheme and logical structure. The English or Shakespearean sonnet form consists of three quatrains of four lines and a couplet of two lines. The couplet generally introduced an unexpected sharp thematic or imagistic "turn". The usual rhyme scheme was a-b-a-b, c-d-c-d, e-f-e-f, g-g.

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  • 6 years ago

    It's a couplet, just did an exam with this question and couplet was the correct answer.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Its a paradox or an oxymoron. I forget which.

    If he's proven wrong then he never wrote the sonnet, but he did write it because its clearly there.

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  • 1 decade ago

    At first glance, illiteracy.

    However upon further review I reminds me of shakespeare some.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Sounds like it could be Iambic Pentameter.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Horrible grammar.

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  • 1 decade ago

    hell with the grammer

    it might be some great work

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    what you wanted to say??

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