Astronomy degrees?

how would you be able to get any degree in astronomy? anything that has to do with space or space travel or space studies I'm only 13 but my cousin says I should start researching because it is a hard feild to get into if you don't know anything

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  • 1 decade ago
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    Astronomy is a bit of a specialization. I will discuss aerospace later.

    For astronomy I highly recommend getting your undergraduate degree in physics, or at least working a great deal of physics courses into your program (at least receiving a minor). Applied math would be OK too if you want to go into theory/computer modeling, but again make sure you get some physics in there. That does not mean you can't take a bunch of astronomy courses including getting a minor or a double major as you work towards the applied math or physics degree.

    If Astronomy is to be your career path, you should save the final specialization for graduate school. Also note that a masters degree will not likely permit you to get fudning for your own research programs, however it could be useful to get involved with someone elses as a technician. A PhD is really the way to go if you a career path in the field.

    There is no telling what the job market will be like in astronomy by the time you are ready to enter it in about 13 years. The trend is to move towards large very expensive observatories to do meaningful observational work. It is therefore essential to be at a school that has a piece of one of these, or at least a program to build instruments (cameras specializing in different capabilities) for such observatories. I wrote a fairly lengthy answer on picking a graduate program earlier, which I link in sources. In general, employment will be the least competitive if you are able to work with hardware, as opposed to only being a computer jockey.

    For now, work on your math and see if you can get an astronomy text book for Xmas. The well written college level intro books will be wonderfully informative and accessible for a young enthusiast like yourself. I personally recommend "The Cosmic Perspective" by Jeffery Bennett et al.

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0805393927/sr=1-4...

    You may find some of these links useful too:

    http://www.aas.org/cswa/links.html

    I now work in aerospace, but don't know a whole lot about the educational track since I went the astronomy route. It is, however a VERY different kind of work than being an astronomer, so you might want to explore in general terms, what kind of work it is you enjoy. (i.e. ask and answer big general questions? Curious, creative? Be self driven? Solve technological problems with specific constraints?)

    This is a question that is difficult to answer at your age, however shadowing professionals in both fields during "Young Minds at Work/Take Our Daughters to Work" type days will give you a small taste.

    I do wish you best of luck, and please feel free to ask me any other questions via the contact conduit attached to my yahoo answers profile with any questions. This goes for you too, Astronomical Gal.

  • gebert
    Lv 4
    3 years ago

    Astronomy Degree

  • 4 years ago

    From what I know, most people working in astronomy got physics degrees and then moved into astronomy. Besides, pretty much all of physics is vital for becoming an astronomer from the quantum scale, to the laws of motion and everything else. To be honest, I'm not sure.

  • 1 decade ago

    You can major in Astronomy, Aerospace Engineering, or Aeronautical engineering if you are going to apply to a state university- most state universities offer aerospace engineering as a degree. If you were looking for a college that specializes solely on astronomy/space studies, I would suggest the Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.

    Good luck with your major - it's pretty challenging.

    Source(s): I'm planning to major in aerospace engineering.
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  • 4 years ago

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    Astronomy degrees?

    how would you be able to get any degree in astronomy? anything that has to do with space or space travel or space studies I'm only 13 but my cousin says I should start researching because it is a hard feild to get into if you don't know anything

    Source(s): astronomy degrees: https://biturl.im/y94RH
  • AresIV
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago

    I majored in aerospace engineering at Purdue. I'd say you're all right if you are only 13. Just showing an interest is enough that age. Don;t worry too much about it. But definitely focus on learning as much about math, science, and physics as you can as those are huge in all aerospace and astronomical fields.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Finally a fellow astronomer. I'm fourteen and already studying it. You have to have at least a Masters degree for a job but then eventually a Doctors to get better pay. hope i helped u

  • 1 decade ago

    yes you should be a minimum qualification of master degree in physics. or bachelor degree of engineering in any field but if you want to be an astronomer only then you have to do master degree in phy. i also want to be an astronomer i am doing master degree in phy. i am 19 now. It will be my pleasure if i can do anything to you that i can.

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