Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsAstronomy & Space · 1 decade ago

How do people who live in space stations take Baths or Showers in Zero Gravity?

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    First of all let me say that most of the answers here are incorrect.

    According to former astronaut William R. Pogue, in his book "How do you go to the bathroom in space?"... Pogue says "We had to bathe just about every day because we got very sweaty during exercise. On workdays, we took a sponge bath, using a washcloth, soap, and water; on our days-off once a week- we had about a half a gallon (two liters) of warm water for a shower. To take a sponge bath, we started by gently squirting water on a washcloth from the water dispenser in the bathroom. The water stuck to the washcloth and looked like a thick layer of gelatin; we had to move it carefully over our bodies. As the water touched the body, it would stick and spread over an area a bit larger than the washcloth. The entire body was wetted this way, and then lathered with soap. Then as much soap lather as possible was removed with the washcloth, which could be wrung out in a special cloth squeezer. Next, water was again spread on the body and again mopped up, until the soap was removed. A towel was then used to dry. It took about thirty minutes to take a sponge bath. A shower also took a long time- about half an hour. We had a zero-gravity shower stall, which was a circular sleeve- about three feet in diameter- with a stationary bottom attached to the floor and a circular top mounted on the ceiling. The sleeve’s wall surface was fastened to the top when ready to shower and fully enclosed the user. Once inside the shower stall, a spray nozzle was used to squirt water on the body and vacuum-cleaner attachment was used to suck off the soapy water both from the skin and form the walls of the shower stall. It was important to save enough water for rinsing off the soap. One Skylab crew member refused to use it at all. I really did not enjoy the shower. IT took a lot of work to get the equipment set up and I got chilled after the shower. The air was so dry that when I opened the shower stall, the rapid evaporation caused uncontrollable shivering for about a minute. The shuttle doesn't have a shower, so the astronauts take sponge baths. The fully assembled space station is designed to have two showers available and the objective is to make it much easier to use than the Skylab shower."

    Hope this helps!

  • 1 decade ago

    I think they take a bath starting from there feet up not from the head down considering in Zero gravity the tendency is that the water will go up not go down.

  • 1 decade ago

    Thay basically sponge bath in a small cabin, and use a sort of vaccum cleaner to suck up water from their bodies, as they cannot allow droplets of water to float away and risk getting into electrical components and causing short circuit.

    Being an anstronaut is kind of a dirty job, in the end.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    There is gravity is space stations and ships. I should know, I'm a master Jedi.

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  • 1 decade ago

    They actually use large wet wipes to clean themselves. They are like larger versions of what you get when you order a full rack of ribs at a restaurant.

    I love wet naps. Those lucky bastarks have all the good stuff!

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    why would you?

    you dont get that smelly really. try and go without a bath for a month and it aint really that bad.

    roommate.

  • 1 decade ago

    They dont take showers. They smell like dead fish.

  • 1 decade ago

    instead of standing on the shower floor they stand on the ceiling

  • 1 decade ago

    This will tell you everything you need to know about living in space. http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/living/index.html

  • 1 decade ago

    With dry body soaps...

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