What does the term "VR" stand for when referring to aircraft?

I know that it is a somewhat common aeronautical term. My friend said any pilot would know this. I think it may be venturi... something? Searched online and couldn't quite find it. Thanks.

Update:

Thanks for the answers so far, but what im looking for is the EXACT translation, What does V stand for and what does R stand for, specific words. And it is not visual reference.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    V speeds are speeds that define certain performance and limiting characteristics of an aircraft. They are established by the manufacturer during design and testing, and are specific to the aircraft model. In many cases, they are defined by reference to the standard atmosphere or other specific conditions, and/or at the aircraft's maximum gross weight, and the pilot is responsible for calculating the effective value based on the actual weight and air density..

    In the U.S., V speeds are stated in knots or, for older aircraft models, miles per hour. For faster aircraft, some speeds are also defined by Mach number. Typically, V speeds are given for an aircraft at maximum gross weight, and should be adjusted downward if the aircraft is flying lighter.

    Speeds frequently used in General Aviation

    VA

    design maneuvering speed (stalling speed at the maximum legal G-force, and hence the maximum speed at which abrupt control movements will not cause the aircraft to exceed its G-force limit).

    VFE

    maximum flap extended speed (a different maximum speed may be specified for partial flap extension).

    VLE

    maximum landing gear extended speed.

    VLO

    maximum landing gear operating speed.

    VMC

    minimum control speed with the critical engine inoperative.

    VNE

    never-exceed speed.

    VR

    rotation speed. The speed of an aircraft at which the pilot initiates rotation to obtain the scheduled takeoff performance. It must be greater or equal to the V1 speed.

    VNO

    maximum structural cruising speed (the maximum speed to be used in turbulent conditions) or can refer to the velocity of normal operation. VNO is specified as the high end of a green arc on many airspeed indicators. This speed is specific to the aircraft model. The range above VNO is marked on the airspeed indicator as a yellow arc from VNO to the VNE.

    VREF

    reference landing approach speed; speed (in calm air) at the landing screen height of 50 ft. Often used by pilots as a base from which to calculate speeds to be used during landing, and calculated as 1.3×VS0 ( JAR regulations changed : Class B 1,3 Vso and Class A 1,23Vsro ).

    VS

    the stalling speed or the minimum steady flight speed at which the airplane is controllable. Usually synonymous with VS1.

    VS0

    the stalling speed or the minimum steady flight speed in the landing configuration.

    VS1

    the stalling speed or the minimum steady flight speed obtained in a specific configuration (usually a "clean" configuration of flaps, landing gear and other sources of drag).

    VX

    speed for best angle of climb. This provides the best altitude gain per unit of horizontal distance, and is usually used for clearing obstacles during takeoff.

    VY

    speed for best rate of climb. This provides the best altitude gain per unit of time, and is used for normal climbout, and for en-route climb under instrument flight rules (IFR), or to climb above icing.

    Source(s): experiential and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/V_speeds
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  • 3 years ago

    Vr Speed

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  • 1 decade ago

    Good answer Aviator_Warrior. A couple others above you are wrong.

    Aviator_Warrior is correct. VR is rotate speed. Somebody above said VR is reference speed. That is not correct reference speed is "VRef".

    Source(s): C-5 Instructor Pilot and licensed Airline Transport Pilot
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  • 4 years ago

    My heavens, I never have been flashed, but I did unintentionally flash a few folks once. I was in the hospital some time back and decided to take a stoll to the vending area. Well, I wasn't thinking about what I was wearing and, let's just say that those hospital gowns don't leave a lot to the imagination on the backside. The nurse came up from behind me and put a blanket over my shoulders . . . I was wondering why it was a little drafty back there!

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  • 5 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    What does the term "VR" stand for when referring to aircraft?

    I know that it is a somewhat common aeronautical term. My friend said any pilot would know this. I think it may be venturi... something? Searched online and couldn't quite find it. Thanks.

    Source(s): term quot vr quot stand referring aircraft: https://biturl.im/pDiZC
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  • 1 decade ago

    VR means Visual Reference. Is a flight status you can fly in, or Pilot.

    Source(s): Airframe Mechanic, and ground school attended.
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  • 1 decade ago

    Speed at which an aircraft can rotate.. You often hear pilots say "VR... Rotate."

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  • 1 decade ago

    Vr (as it is usually written) is the rotate speed of an aircraft. V = velocity, r = rotate.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I think you really mean VFR that is Visual Flight Rules.

    RVR is runway visual range

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