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Do you think that STEM CELL research is important?

Have you heard of any more progress in the transfer, grafting or reimplantation of "Islte's of Langerhans" Glands? I have several friends and family members who have suffered and died because of Diabetes.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    yes ..

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  • Alicia
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    Stem cell research is extremely important. The main reason is that they have to capability to become any type of cell. This means that they can be used to replace nervous tissue for Parkinson's disease sufferers and diabetes sufferers even. I mean will the possibility to regenerate tissue or cells that have no chance of rejection is amazing. They are the new holy grail of biology and unfortunately its research is limited by the ruling of the current Bush administration. But there is no need to worry as the rest of the world sees the promise in stem cells and is continuing research in it nonetheless. The US will be left behind but sense medical techniques and discovery are shared there will only be a slight delay in revolutionary treat of people which such diseases.

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  • Bosco: I can tell you need some new stem cells in there...you picked them all out.

    Yes, stem cell research is extremely important for many diseases. Years ago (early 80's) they were developing stem cells in Europe for people with Parkinsons Disease, and in some people it actually did stimulate regrowth.

    Look at Michael J. Fox...he's got a family and kids, and when you consider how long people live, he's relatively young. You die slowly with Parkinsons, and like any other disease I'm sure it's taking it's toll on not only him, but his family. He will eventually reach a state of paralysis deemed 'frozen' because he will not be able to move at all. He will be able to feel things, like his kids hugging him, but he won't be able to hug them back.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Yes. Some of the most serious medical conditions, such as cancer and birth defects, are due to abnormal cell division and differentiation, which is part of the focus of stem cell research. A better understanding of the genetic and molecular controls of these processes may yield information about how such diseases arise and suggest new strategies for therapy.

    Human stem cells could also be used to test new drugs. For example, new medications could be tested for safety on differentiated cells generated from human pluripotent cell lines. Other kinds of cell lines are already used in this way. Cancer cell lines, for example, are used to screen potential anti-tumor drugs. But, the availability of pluripotent stem cells would allow drug testing in a wider range of cell types. However, to screen drugs effectively, the conditions must be identical when comparing different drugs. Therefore, scientists will have to be able to precisely control the differentiation of stem cells into the specific cell type on which drugs will be tested. Current knowledge of the signals controlling differentiation fall well short of being able to mimic these conditions precisely to consistently have identical differentiated cells for each drug being tested.

    Perhaps the most important potential application of human stem cells is the generation of cells and tissues that could be used for cell-based therapies. Today, donated organs and tissues are often used to replace ailing or destroyed tissue, but the need for transplantable tissues and organs far outweighs the available supply. Stem cells, directed to differentiate into specific cell types, offer the possibility of a renewable source of replacement cells and tissues to treat diseases including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, spinal cord injury, stroke, burns, heart disease, diabetes, osteoarthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Source(s): National Institute of Health
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  • 1 decade ago

    Yes I do think stem cell research is important.

    I also think that the US is falling behind once again in science research & we'll spend years & megabucks catching up when we finally wake up.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Absolutely! I believe that stem cell research is crucial to solving many health problems that are thus far incurable. I think it was wrong of Bush to sign the bill against it.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I do think that stem cell research is important. With the current restrictions, however, on research in the US, it is likely that most breakthroughs will occur elsewhere.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I think it's important, BUT why kill a living organism - a human at that? They shouldn't do it.

    Isn't there some other way to do it? Umbilical cord cells? Something else?

    I wouldn't want it to be MY baby that's being torn and shred to pieces. (Yes, I know it's an embryo, but it's a BABY)

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  • 1 decade ago

    Yes, for one i am Diabetic, and for 2 stem cells are NOT alive, they throw most of them away anyways..a little tiny cell isnt alive..even if it "technically" is there not going to do anything with it anyways.

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  • VERY important...

    I always find it a bit weird when people (like the answerer above mine) are worried about "killing a human organism."

    Wouldn't you rather kill a living organism that has no sense of pain (and is yet to exist) then have a person that is alive and does feel pain die?

    They'd rather not "kill a living organism" then cure hundreds of disease that CHILDREN alive today have (i.e. like juvenile diabetes...etc) I swear their stupidity just drives me crazy

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  • .
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    Absolutely, it's important...and the fact it's being thwarted in our country really p*sses me off...how many people will die needlessly or suffer needlessly because of idiots that won't allow research on something that was going to be discarded anyway? *shakes head*

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