it's true... asked in PetsCats · 1 decade ago

Can a landlord charge you extra for pet damage even after you've paid a nonrefundable pet deposit?

I paid a pet deposit when we first moved into my old house - and my pet did some minor damage that cost less than the pet deposit was for.

Does my landlord have the legal right to make me pay additionally for the damage, even though he still has money leftover from my nonrefundable deposit?

13 Answers

Relevance
  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    You need to check the state law of landlord and tenant agreement. There are many scandelous landlords and yes there are some bad tenants. But before you continue to pay for more damages, I would find out what your rights as a tenants are especially if you are paying for more than what the damage is worth. Your cause is worth pursuing and I don't think it is right for the landlord to charge you more than what the damage was.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    He cant, unless the damage is over the amount of the initial deposit, and interest associated with it (if any)

    But, if you dont have PROOF of that, the chances are he can take advantage of that, if you went to small claims court, unless you requires it for ALL of his tenants, then you have background records of him charging that amount.

    A pet deposit was to protect you, and the landlord, from minor damage like door clawing and minor carpet staining that can be shampooed out, anything past that is pretty excessive. Most landlords that allow pets take a HUGE risk by letting animals on their property.

    Get an direct estimate of the MOST cost the damage would be to fix. Not just the minor, this can include carpet repair, stain lifting, door replacement, Flea infestation, any of those, are common pet damages.

    When you get your estimate and your proof of your deposit, bring it to small claims court.

    If you aren't moving out, and it's an annual inspection. Then you have to pay for the damage, his deposit was only for a move out, repairs, not current repairs.

    i hope i helped.

    But, dont rush it, your deposit may have covered the damage, you need him to show you the reciept or get an estimate on the damage. If your deposit that you gave him,

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    How much are we talking about here? I'm guessing $200. Probably the landlord wants the pet deposit to cover any damage in the place that isn't immediately visible. This one is a little sticky. If you plan to continue living there, you should probably pay. If not, let him come after you for it--he probably won't.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    The renters law, as I understand it (in CA at least) is that when you move out, your apartment/house has to be restored to the same state it was when you moved in. What the landlord is responsible for is things that break down by wear and tear. For instance, he can't charge you for refinishing your kitchen with new appliances.

    Yes your landlord has the legal right to charge you for damage additional to the deposit. If you're a stickler for details, then ask for a charge by charge account of how your money was used. If anything seems out of line you could fight it.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    yes. that deposit was essentially to allow the dog to live there. since you are never getting it back, it doesn't count towards any damages sustained by your animal. so, technically, he can bill you in addition to the deposit for damages your animal caused. sucks but that;s the way some landlords are.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    If your landlord can prove the damage was more than the deposit, yes. If not, no.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    Not likely. Refuse to pay. If he wants to take you to court- let him, and you'll win the case anyway. He'll probably just drop the issue when he see's he cant swindle you.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    yes... the security deposit is for the "best guess" of dammage. If you exceed that... you owe more.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    Look at what the lease agreement said. It is your contract.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    Read your contract.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.