Is one million abbreviated M or MM?

In finance, I see both. And what is the origin of both?

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
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    MM: an abbreviation for one million, seen in a few traditional units such as those listed below. The abbreviation is meant to indicate one thousand thousand, M being the Roman numeral 1000. However, MM actually means 2000, not one million, in Roman numeration.

    Reference: http://www.eia.doe.gov/neic/pubstyle/measure.htm

    Reference: http://www.unc.edu/~rowlett/units/dictM.html

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    • Mia5 years agoReport

      I think it is a shortened version of writing zeros. When you write 000, it uses the same three downward strokes as M. and 000 000 as M M.

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  • 6 years ago

    The 'M' (which should always be capitalized) originates from an abbreviation for the Latin word mille meaning 1000. The 'M' should be be used with numbers related to intangible and conceptual subjects like money, time, and counting. Related to the 'M' is the 'k' (always a lower-case) which is the abbreviation for kilo-. The 'k' abbreviation should be used with tangible and physical subjects like distance and weight.

    Usage: The abbreviation for $100,000 is $1M.

    The abbreviation for $1,000,000 is $1MM.

    The confusion comes from a former symbol abbreviation of an 'M' with an overstrike or overbar. This overbar means that the mille (1,000) is multiplied again by 1,000 in lieu of 'MM'. So a number followed by an M with an overstrike means the preceding number is multiplied by 1,000,000. Since it is very difficult to create this symbol it is hardly ever seen and was improperly abbreviated as a single 'M' instead of the proper 'MM'.

    because this grammar rule is little known outside the financial world, it is often used incorrectly and the slang of 'k' for thousand is often used even by venerated publications such as the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal.

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    • Nicholas5 years agoReport

      k for kilo is hardly slang, it's a global scientific standard. The financial world should probably apply a little scientific rigor to what they do, starting with abbreviations.

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  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    Is one million abbreviated M or MM?

    In finance, I see both. And what is the origin of both?

    Source(s): million abbreviated mm: https://knowledge.im/?s=million+abbreviated+mm
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  • 5 years ago

    In Roman numerals M=1000, so using the Roman nomenclature MM=2000 not 1,000,000.

    I'm an electronic tech. and was taught based on Greek nomenclature that k(kilo)=1000. m(mili)=.001. M(Mega)=1,000,000.

    Using MM for a million seems to be used a lot but seems wrong to me.

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  • 5 years ago

    James has it correctly. What's with all the opinions "This is the only way" errors prior to his statement? Yes, 1 million is 1M, 1 thousand is 1k (note the small 'k'), one thousandth is 1m (milli), and one millionth is 1u (micro). NEVER use MM. 1 billion is 1G (Giga = 10^9), and for your rich dreamers, 1 trillion is 1T (Tera).

    From high-to-low: 1E12 (1 followed by 12 zeros) = 1T (tera), 1E9 = 1G (giga), 1E6 = 1M (mega), 1E3= 1k (kilo), 1E-2= 0.01= 1d (deci), 1E-3= 1m (milli), 1E-6 = 1u (micro), 1E-9=1n (nano), and 1E-12 = 1p (pico).

    Note which are small vs capitalized

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  • 1 decade ago

    I believe it's MM.

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  • 1 decade ago

    M is for more causal writing, but if you want to hold to the finance standard, then it's MM. The latin origin mille is why M is for thousand.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I think it's MM, because M is the roman numeral for a thousand.

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  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    It's MM. Only idiots use M for million.

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    • Nicholas5 years agoReport

      Actually, the scientific and engineering world uses M for Mega meaning 1,000,000. mm is millimetre, obviously. MM for million is archaic. And, as others have noted here, it strictly means 2,000, so it's archaic and idiotic and unscientific.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I think it's something to do with the difference between the European and American definitions of "one million". Don't Americans add an extra 0 to their version of a million - hence million-million (mm)?

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