Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Politics & GovernmentLaw & Ethics · 1 decade ago

Does a notarized document expire?

Does a document that was notarized ever expire? I had heard that after 8 years you had to have a new document drawn up and notarized again. True?

Do the laws vary state to state?

Thanks!

Update:

This document that is notarized is a lease for residential property, the lease is 10 years old. The document was signed in Wisconsin but was for property located in South Carolina.

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  • Phil R
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    You weren't very specific on what type of document you were talking about.

    A will, if properly signed, and witnessed by a Notary Public, remains in force until it is either revoked, replaced by a new will, or has a codicil added to it. (a codicil doesn't actually revoke the will though, it just changes some provisions). Other documents may expire, but if they do, they generally have an expiration on them.

    A Notary Public's commission is valid for a set period of time. That time period varies from state to state. If the document was properly executed, (i.e. you properly identified yourself to the notary, and if necessary, were sworn before your signature), then the Notary's signature is valid. It does not expire, since it is an attestation by the Notary that at the moment you signed the document, it was you that signed it, that you did so willingly, etc.

    It is often a good idea to have documents such as a will reviewed every few years, and perhaps a new one drawn up. This is especially true if something has changed in your life... married, divorced, added children, moved to a different state.. you get the drift.

    Edit: You noted that the document in question is a residential lease. Residential leases are governed by the Landlord Tenant law of the state where the land is located. The fact that the document was signed in a different state is irrelevant. Without seeing the lease I can't answer more speficially.

    Consult an attorney in your state for specific answers on the document you're talking about.

    Source(s): 10+ years experience in the legal profession.
  • coby
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    Notarized Document

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    A notarized document shall expire based on the type of document (i.e. contract, deed, or time-sensitive court motion). A contract notarization will expire when the contract is completely fulfilled (e.g. a cell phone contract may be notarized for a two-year plan, but after two years, the notarization is nullified). A deed's notarization has no time constraints: because they are recorded on county and city land records, the notarization shall last as long as the document is in tact. On a time-sensitive motion in most criminal courts, notarization, though not completely necessary for most documents, will expire with the commissioner's expiration date. All notary publics have a stamp that tells when their commission expires. If a document is stamped with an expired notary public's stamp, it is void. If the notary public's commission expires in three years, the document will be voidable, unless the notary public renews his or her license.

    Of course, always consult an attorney before doing anything that may effect the law.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    The document is not notarized, your signature is. It's done so there will be no question that you personally signed the document. I've never heard of a notarization expriring. Wills, for example, are notarized and hold up for years. It wouldn't hurt to ask someone who knows for sure, though, like a notary.

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  • 6 years ago

    where do i find The Notorized document of Alfred Cleophas Williams

    4715 Almanza Ave ,Sarasota Florida 34235 he was the notary for a property document

    for Rosetta Grant Irving signed in Brooklyn NY 1974 sell property in Turks Island.

    Where can we find those Documents

    thank you

  • D
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago

    Laws do vary state to state and some documents will expire and some will not.

  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    For the best answers, search on this site https://shorturl.im/avYFm

    No. All that stamp is telling anyone is that they have noted the signature during a time when they were a legal notary. lp

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