MJW asked in Food & DrinkBeer, Wine & Spirits · 1 decade ago

what makes kosher wine kosher?

13 Answers

Relevance
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    I would say the cultivation process of the grape...

    But...there is a much longer history...

    In general, kashrut deals with avoiding specific forbidden foods, none of which are normally used in winemaking, so it might seem that all wines are automatically "kosher". However, because of wine's special role in many non-Jewish religions, the kashrut laws specify that wine cannot be considered kosher if it might have been used for "idolatry".

    Some of these concepts include:

    Yayin Nesekh (Wine that has been poured to an idol, or with idolatry in mind.)

    Stam Yainom (Wine that may have been touched by someone who might believe in idolatry, but wouldn't have had it in mind at the time of contact.)

    When kosher wine is mevushal ("cooked" or "boiled"), it thereby becomes unfit for idolatrous use and will keep the status of kosher wine even if subsequently touched by an idolator. See section below for more details.

    Intermingling - There are prohibitions on several foods, including wine, in order to prevent intermingling amongst non-Jews in order to reduce the chances of intermarriage.

    In recent times, there has been an increased demand for kosher wines and a number of wine producing countries now produce a wide variety of sophisticated kosher wines under strict rabbinical supervision, particularly in Israel, the United States, France, Italy and South Africa. Two of the world's largest producers and importers of kosher wines, Kedem and Manischewitz, are both based in the northeast of the USA.

  • 1 decade ago

    In general, kashrut deals with avoiding specific forbidden foods, none of which are normally used in winemaking, so it might seem that all wines are automatically "kosher". However, because of wine's special role in many non-Jewish religions, the kashrut laws specify that wine cannot be considered kosher if it might have been used for "idolatry".

    Some of these concepts include:

    Yayin Nesekh (Wine that has been poured to an idol, or with idolatry in mind.)

    Stam Yainom (Wine that may have been touched by someone who might believe in idolatry, but wouldn't have had it in mind at the time of contact.)

    When kosher wine is mevushal ("cooked" or "boiled"), it thereby becomes unfit for idolatrous use and will keep the status of kosher wine even if subsequently touched by an idolator. See section below for more details.

    Intermingling - There are prohibitions on several foods, including wine, in order to prevent intermingling amongst non-Jews in order to reduce the chances of intermarriage.

    In recent times, there has been an increased demand for kosher wines and a number of wine producing countries now produce a wide variety of sophisticated kosher wines under strict rabbinical supervision, particularly in Israel, the United States, France, Italy and South Africa. Two of the world's largest producers and importers of kosher wines, Kedem and Manischewitz, are both based in the northeast of the USA.

  • ndtaya
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    Kosher wine (Hebrew: יין כשר, yayin kashèr) results only when wine is produced according to Judaism's religious law, specifically, the Jewish dietary laws of (kashrut, Hebrew: כשרות), and then is known as "kosher wine". However other branches of Judaism are more "lenient" with these laws. Reform Judaism does not observe these laws.

  • Joy L
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago

    there's always a "mashgiach" present, who observes every step of the winemaking to make sure that everything is in order . . and, if I'm not mistaken, the wine is boiled to kill any presence of insects which would render the wine not kosher

  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • 1 decade ago

    The Rabbi comes to inspect the manufacturing process to be sure it follows the rules laid down in Jewish law and if it does, he gives the manufacturer permission to put kosher on the lable.

  • 1 decade ago

    a prayer by a rabbi makes it kosher. and some other things. like payers.

  • 1 decade ago

    Basically it is made with the supervision of a rabbi. There is a great deal of procedures that have to be followed in order for this to happen.

  • 1 decade ago

    Being blessed by a rabbi and made under certain orthodox conditions.

    Most any Jewish folks here could explain much better than I.

  • Circumcised grapes

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    A Rabi killed the grapes

Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.