Who is the father of Algebra?

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al-Khwārizmī


Arabic in full Muḥammad ibn Mūsā al-Khwārizmī

born с 780, Baghdad, Iraq
died с 850

Muslim mathematician and astronomer.

He lived in Baghdad during the golden age of Islamic science and, like Euclid, wrote mathematical books that collected and arranged the discoveries of earlier mathematicians. His Al-Kitāb al-mukhtaṣar fī ḥisāb al-jabr wa'l-muqābala ("The Compendious Book on Calculation by Completion and Balancing") is a compilation of rules for solving linear and quadratic equations, as well as problems of geometry and proportion. Its translation into Latin in the 12th century provided the link between the great Hindu and Arab mathematicians and European scholars. A corruption of the book's title resulted in the word algebra; a corruption of the author's own name resulted in the term algorithm.

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  • sorryna answered 8 years ago
    after a search i found two answers: Diophantus and Al-Khwarizmi.
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  • ? answered 8 years ago
    Diophantus was a Greek mathematician who worked in Alexandria around 250 A.D. He was called by some "The Father of Algebra".He wrote a 13 volume treatise on Math of which we have 6 volumes.The other seven volumes have been lost.

    Diophantus was the first man that we know of who used letters for variables, developing the synocopated style of writing equations. The Greek letter above is "zeta" which Diophantus used instead of "X."

    Diophantus made numerous contributions in the area of algebraic symbolism. However, he only worked with integers. Consequently, Diophantine equations involve only integers as coefficients.

    Al-Khwarizmi, also known as, Abu Jafar Muhammad ibn Musa al-Khwarizmi was born in Baghdad, ca 780 AD, a city now in Iraq, around 780 and died around 850. Although there is little information on the life of Al-Khwarizmi, what we do know is rather profound. He is known today as the "father of algebra".
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  • Yourname Here answered 8 years ago
    Al-Khwarizmi: The Father of Algebra. Historical Background. Abu Ja'far Muhammad ibn Musa al-Khwarizmi was born circa 780 CE. Although his name ... the foundation of modern mathematics, thus earning al-Khwarizmi the title of "the Father of Algebra ...

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  • Madison answered 8 years ago
    Algebra has ancient origins, although its development is frequently attributed to Euclid of ancient Greece and Rene Descartes in the 17th century.

    Even before Euclid,, however, algebra was known in basic form in the ancient theories of equasions. There is evidence in Mesopotamian cuneiforn tablets that it was quite developed even before the birth of Christ in what has been called the fertile crescent or what is now called the Mid East. Even earlier the Egyptions most probably used equasions in the building of the pyramids but their theories were less advanced than in Mesopotamia.

    The theory of quadratic equasions in geometric form, a forerunner of modern algebra was developed in Greece as early as 300 BC by Euclid, mentioned above, who is frequently called the father of Algebra.

    Also algebra was used and developed further in the Hellenistic world after the Alexandrian conquest. Alexandria, in Egypt became a great center of learning and Greek (Hellenistic) scholars developed and used algebraic theory in the construction of the great edifices throughout the Hellenistic world.

    There are also Indian texts showing its use in India in the fifth and sixth centuries BC.

    By the tenth century however the great centers of learning were in the Arab world and the use and development of the ancient equasion theory as developed by Euclid and those who followed him continued to be used and developed there. It was, in fact, the great muslim scholars that preserved the ancient Greek heritage of learning including the works of Plato and Aristotle as well as that of Euclid. Muhammad ibn-Musa al Khwarizmi, about 850 AD, produced a writing that was translated into Latin and from this writing algebra was re-introduced into Europe, but its roots were of Greek, Euclidian, origin..

    It was not until the 12th century, however, before algebra returned to Europe, were it continued to develop until the 17th century when Rene Descartes applied algebra as it existed then to coordinate geometry. He took the principles of Euclid and those that followed him and developed modern algebraic techniques. including the identification of the sign rule and introduction of new symbols. From his time on Algebra developed in coordination with analytical geometry and calculus.

    What is known as modern Algebra probably begins with Paolo Ruffini and the mathamaticians of the 19th century who continued to refine it.

    Although Algebra has many roots and contributors and in its modern form it is a long way from its Mesopotamian, Egyptian and Greek origins, its essence is most likely found in the ancient Greek theories of quadratic equasions in geometrical form and it is, therefore, Euclid who seems to get the credit for being its father.
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  • hunga bunga answered 8 years ago
    he's al khawarizmi,
    and you're using arabic numbers
    [1 2 3 4 5 ] due to him
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  • Corn_Flake answered 8 years ago
    History

    Hellenistic mathematician Euclid details geometrical algebra in Elements.The origins of algebra can be traced to the ancient Babylonians, who developed an advanced arithmetical system with which they were able to do calculations in an algebraic fashion. With the use of this system they were able to apply formulae and calculate solutions for unknown values for a class of problems typically solved today by using linear equations, quadratic equations, and indeterminate linear equations. By contrast, most Egyptians of this era, and most Indian, Greek and Chinese mathematicians in the first millennium BC, usually solved such equations by geometric methods, such as those described in the Moscow and Rhind Mathematical Papyri, Sulba Sutras, Euclid's Elements, and The Nine Chapters on the Mathematical Art. The geometric work of the Greeks, typified in the Elements, provided the framework for generalizing formulae beyond the solution of particular problems into more general systems of stating and solving equations.

    Indian mathematicians proceeded to write treatises on algebraic means of solving equations from the end of the first millennium BC, followed by Hellenistic mathematicians from the early first millennium AD. Important algebraic works from this general era include the Bakhshali Manuscript, the works of Hero of Alexandria, the Arithmetica of Diophantus, the Aryabhatiya of Aryabhata, and the Brahma Sputa Siddhanta of Brahmagupta.

    The word "algebra" is named after the Arabic word "al-jabr" from the title of the book al-Kitāb al-muḫtaṣar fī ḥisāb al-ğabr wa-l-muqābala, meaning The book of Summary Concerning Calculating by Transposition and Reduction, a book written by the Persian Muslim mathematician Muḥammad ibn Mūsā al-Ḵwārizmī in 820. The word al-jabr means "reunion". Al-Khwarizmi is often considered the "father of algebra" (though that title is also given to Diophantus), as much of his works on reduction are still in use today. Another Persian mathematician Omar Khayyam developed algebraic geometry and found the general geometric solution of the cubic equation. The Indian mathematicians Mahavira and Bhaskara, and the Chinese mathematician Zhu Shijie, solved various cubic, quartic, quintic and higher-order polynomial equations.

    Another key event in the further development of algebra was the general algebraic solution of the cubic and quartic equations, developed in the mid-16th century. The idea of a determinant was developed by Japanese mathematician Kowa Seki in the 17th century, followed by Gottfried Leibniz ten years later, for the purpose of solving systems of simultaneous linear equations using matrices. Gabriel Cramer also did some work on matrices and determinants in the 18th century. Abstract algebra was developed in the 19th century, initially focusing on what is now called Galois theory, and on constructibility issues.

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  • Sherlock answered 8 years ago
    al-Khwarizmi (780-850, Islamic) was the inventor of algebra.
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  • Brozink answered 8 years ago
    Al Gebra,he was a math genius
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  • Jane Skellington answered 8 years ago
    Well, his mother claims it's Euclid.
    I'm betting it's the milkman.
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  • Nik answered 8 years ago
    Algeber wal Mukablai
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  • deadkid97 answered 8 years ago
    john hankok
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  • onedeepen answered 8 years ago
    Sports Bra ????
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  • porky answered 8 years ago
    EUCLID!!!
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  • VinceYoung answered 8 years ago
    plato - 10 points here please
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  • tomar_shopno answered 8 years ago
    NONE ELSE THAN HUSBAND OF MOTHER OF ALGEBRA
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  • sneha answered 8 years ago
    my daddy
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  • david_boldo2 answered 8 years ago
    ur dad
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