yunru asked in 新聞與活動最新活動 · 2 decades ago

我國參與聯合國的意義與展望

我想請問一下:『我國參與聯合國的意義與展望?』

因為是期末成績,所以內容我想做的更詳細些,謝謝!^^

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  • 2 decades ago
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    這是外交部以及台北駐美經濟文化辦事處所寫的參加UN的意義與未來展望 可以參考一下 寫的很中肯

    In September 2000, the UN General Assembly adopted the United Nations Millennium Declaration, pledging to recognize "a collective responsibility to uphold the principles of human dignity, equality and equity at the global level." This pronouncement reaffirms the member states’ commitment to the principles of the UN Charter. However, despite the Declaration’s acknowledgement that "nations and peoples have become increasingly interconnected and interdependent," one country remains outside the UN family. The Republic of China (ROC), commonly known as Taiwan, is still waiting to be welcomed, and its people hope to be accorded the fundamental human right to equal respect and participation in global projects and activities.

    The government and the people of Taiwan seek urgent redress to this unjust situation. Cherishing the UN’s founding ideals of peace and human rights, they wish to fulfill their obligations as responsible members of the world community and cooperate with other nations in providing humanitarian assistance and supporting sustainable development. In this era of globalization, the people of Taiwan want to be a part of the UN’s effort to create a shared future for all of humanity.

    Since the Chinese communists took control of the Chinese mainland and established the People’s Republic of China (PRC) in 1949, the two sides of the Taiwan Strait have been governed as separate countries, with neither having any control or jurisdiction over the other. Taiwan sets its own policies, conducts its own national defense, and engages in formal and substantive relations with other states of the world community. All political, economic, and trade agreements that cover Taiwan are negotiated with its government alone.

    Taiwan now is a free, vibrant democracy. Extensive constitutional reforms over the past two decades have expanded its democratic process, including the nation’s first general parliamentary elections in 1992 and the first direct presidential election in 1996. The presidential election of 2000 ended five decades of government under the Kuomintang and effected the peaceful transfer of executive power to the Democratic Progressive Party. Taiwan’s success in building democracy and promoting human rights bear witness to the perseverance of its people as well as its government’s commitment to peace, justice and freedom.

    Taiwan believes strongly in the universality and indivisibility of all human rights. The government has promised to bring Taiwan back into the international human rights system, pledging to abide by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, ratify the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, and implement the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action. Taiwan is currently in the process of establishing a National Human Rights Commission in accordance with UN standards as well as domesticating the said Covenants and other important international legal tools of human rights protection as a Human Rights Basic Law.

    Taiwan has long enjoyed economic prosperity thanks to the talent, ambition and hard work of its people. They have transformed this small, resource-poor island into a country with the third largest foreign exchange reserves, 15th largest trade volume, and third largest volume of IT exports. This exceptional economic performance guarantees that Taiwan is well-equipped to fulfill the UN’s goal of "higher standards of living, full employment, and conditions of economic and social progress and development."

    In spite of its success, Taiwan has not been admitted to share the responsibility of fostering worldwide economic and social development, or its experience of peaceful political and social transformation with the rest of the world. In 1971, General Assembly Resolution 2758 solved the issue of representation for the PRC in the UN and its affiliated organizations. But this resolution did not confer on the PRC the right to represent the government and the people of Taiwan. Thus, the 23 million people of Taiwan have been excluded from the United Nations.

    Taiwan’s exclusion from the United Nations has hindered its ability to contribute to multilateral efforts towards the common good of the world. Representation in this most universal organization in the world would provide the people of Taiwan a more effective and efficient channel to coordinate efforts and expand cooperation with other members of the global community. Such participation would enable Taiwan to contribute to and benefit from international solutions to global problems. Given Taiwan’s strategic location in the Asia-Pacific, it would also allow Taiwan to play a crucial role in maintaining enduring peace and security in the region and the world.

    In this new century, where global cooperation plays a key role in all endeavors for peace and prosperity, the international community cannot afford to shut out a responsible and peace-loving partner. The United Nations must uphold the principle of universality and invite Taiwan to lend a hand in making the world a better place for all.

    PROPOSAL

    In September 2000, the UN General Assembly adopted the United Nations Millennium Declaration, pledging to recognize "a collective responsibility to uphold the principles of human dignity, equality and equity at the global level." This pronouncement reaffirms the member states’ commitment to the principles of the UN Charter. However, despite the Declaration’s acknowledgement that "nations and peoples have become increasingly interconnected and interdependent," one country remains outside the UN family. The Republic of China (ROC), commonly known as Taiwan, is still waiting to be welcomed, and its people hope to be accorded the fundamental human right to equal respect and participation in global projects and activities.

    The government and the people of Taiwan seek urgent redress to this unjust situation. Cherishing the UN’s founding ideals of peace and human rights, they wish to fulfill their obligations as responsible members of the world community and cooperate with other nations in providing humanitarian assistance and supporting sustainable development. In this era of globalization, the people of Taiwan want to be a part of the UN’s effort to create a shared future for all of humanity.

    Since the Chinese communists took control of the Chinese mainland and established the People’s Republic of China (PRC) in 1949, the two sides of the Taiwan Strait have been governed as separate countries, with neither having any control or jurisdiction over the other. Taiwan sets its own policies, conducts its own national defense, and engages in formal and substantive relations with other states of the world community. All political, economic, and trade agreements that cover Taiwan are negotiated with its government alone.

    Taiwan now is a free, vibrant democracy. Extensive constitutional reforms over the past two decades have expanded its democratic process, including the nation’s first general parliamentary elections in 1992 and the first direct presidential election in 1996. The presidential election of 2000 ended five decades of government under the Kuomintang and effected the peaceful transfer of executive power to the Democratic Progressive Party. Taiwan’s success in building democracy and promoting human rights bear witness to the perseverance of its people as well as its government’s commitment to peace, justice and freedom.

    Taiwan believes strongly in the universality and indivisibility of all human rights. The government has promised to bring Taiwan back into the international human rights system, pledging to abide by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, ratify the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, and implement the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action. Taiwan is currently in the process of establishing a National Human Rights Commission in accordance with UN standards as well as domesticating the said Covenants and other important international legal tools of human rights protection as a Human Rights Basic Law.

    Taiwan has long enjoyed economic prosperity thanks to the talent, ambition and hard work of its people. They have transformed this small, resource-poor island into a country with the third largest foreign exchange reserves, 15th largest trade volume, and third largest volume of IT exports. This exceptional economic performance guarantees that Taiwan is well-equipped to fulfill the UN’s goal of "higher standards of living, full employment, and conditions of economic and social progress and development."

    In spite of its success, Taiwan has not been admitted to share the responsibility of fostering worldwide economic and social development, or its experience of peaceful political and social transformation with the rest of the world. In 1971, General Assembly Resolution 2758 solved the issue of representation for the PRC in the UN and its affiliated organizations. But this resolution did not confer on the PRC the right to represent the government and the people of Taiwan. Thus, the 23 million people of Taiwan have been excluded from the United Nations.

    Taiwan’s exclusion from the United Nations has hindered its ability to contribute to multilateral efforts towards the common good of the world. Representation in this most universal organization in the world would provide the people of Taiwan a more effective and efficient channel to coordinate efforts and expand cooperation with other members of the global community. Such participation would enable Taiwan to contribute to and benefit from international solutions to global problems. Given Taiwan’s strategic location in the Asia-Pacific, it would also allow Taiwan to play a crucial role in maintaining enduring peace and security in the region and the world.

    In this new century, where global cooperation plays a key role in all endeavors for peace and prosperity, the international community cannot afford to shut out a responsible and peace-loving partner. The United Nations must uphold the principle of universality and invite Taiwan to lend a hand in making the world a better place for all.

    我國準備申請的資料如下

    http://www.mofa.gov.tw/webapp/ct?xItem=13394&ctNod...

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