what is the hardest substance in the world? substance in the world?

Before now it is believed that diamond is the hardest substance, hence the saying only diamond can cut diamond

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Best Answer

    Diamond is the hardest known naturally occurring material, scoring 10 on the relative Mohs scale of mineral hardness and having an absolute hardness value of between 167 and 231 gigapascals in various tests. Diamond's hardness has been known since antiquity, and is the source of its name. However, aggregated diamond nanorods, an allotrope of carbon first synthesized in 2005, are now believed to be even harder than diamond.

  • 3 years ago

    Hardest Substance On Earth

  • 1 decade ago

    Diamond

  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

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    what is the hardest substance in the world?

    substance in the world?

    Before now it is believed that diamond is the hardest substance, hence the saying only diamond can cut diamond

    Source(s): hardest substance world substance world: https://tr.im/4qoVy
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  • 3 years ago

    Strongest Substance On Earth

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Yes, Diamond is the hardest substance known. However, there often seems to be some confusion about what exactly that means.

    Hardness refers specifically to a substance's resistance to abrasion. If you rub two substances together, the harder one will scratch the softer substance.

    This does not refer at all to the density of the substance, or its tensile strength, or torsional strength, etc. etc. It only refers to its resistance to being scratched by other objects.

    Diamonds can be cut because they have a crystalline structure. By applying careful pressure, the diamond can be fractured along these cleavage planes.

    This crystalline structure also makes diamond unsuitable as a building material. A beam or column made of diamond would break along these crystalline cleavage planes, and could not support the weight of something like steel (which has a hardness of only about 7).

    Density is also unrelated to hardness. Both gold and lead are very dense materials, but they are both very soft. They can be scratched or scored very easily.

    The chemical formula for diamond is simply C. Pure diamond is nothing but carbon. In theory, once nanotechnology becomes common place, it should be very easy to produce as much diamond as we want as long as we have a source of carbon. In Neil Stephenson's novel Diamond Age diamond is more common that glass, forming most windows and such. For this to be safe, we'd probably need to create laminated sheets of diamond with each layer oriented a different way. That way a crack in the diamond's crystal structure would only be in that layer.

    The refractive index of diamond is very high too, about 2.42 I think. This might make viewing through diamond quite distorted.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Diamond

  • 1 decade ago

    Yes, that is right. Diamond is a form of carbon isotope and occurs in its own natural shape, but we could use the first diamond to shape others into a shape that we like.

    However, physicists now believe (and there is evidence) that another form of carbon isotope is the strongest material. They are carbon nanotubes. They are very small, but are about 50 times stronger than steel. It might seem pointless to remanufacture these but they will be useful for making smaller and faster computers.

  • 1 decade ago

    According to the Moh (Sp?) hardness scale, which rates stones from 1-10, diamond is a 10 (the scale is based on diamond as the highest and talc as the lowest). I've not heard of anything that has been invented as higher. (I saw someone else asked how diamonds were cut--they are actually full of occlusions (faults), and diamond cutters do their original shaping by breaking them apart at the occlusions.

  • 1 decade ago

    On the hardness scale, I believe diamond is the highest.

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