Has anyone heard of the poem - John was a tyrant?

The poem starts off - John was a tyrant, John was a tartar, John put his name to the Magna Carta, And every baron from Thames to Tweed followed the road to Runnymead.

I'm sure there's more to this poem- but I can't find it anywhere on the net (we used to say it in school)

6 Answers

Relevance
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    "John was a tyrant, / John was a tartar"

    This poem beginning "John was a tyrant, / John was a tartar, / But John put his name to the Great Big Charter" is called 'King John', and is by Hugh Chesterman (b.1884). It is in Brian Moses' anthology Blood and Roses: British History in Poetry, which was published by Hodder Children's Books in 2004.

    John was a tyrant, John was a tarter

    John put his name to the great big charter.

    Every barron from Thames to Tweed,

    Followed that road to Runnymead.

    Every Barron had something to say

    To poor preplesed King John that day.

    Pray sign your name, said Guy De Gaunt,

    It's easily done and it's all we want,

    A "J" and an "O" and an "H" and an "N",

    Said Hugo, Barron of Harpenden

  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    I remember this from school over 50 years ago, I think in a children's' anthology. Oxford Book of....? One of those poems that I use to remember key bits of history though I can't remember the full text.

  • 6 years ago

    John was a tyrant, John was a tarter

    John put his name to the Great Big Charter.

    Every baron from Thames to Tweed,

    Followed that road to Runnymead.

    Every Barron had something to say

    To poor perplexed King John that day.

    "Pray sign your name," said Guy de Gaunt,

    It s easily done and it s all we want,

    "A J and an O and an N", said Hugo, Baron of Harpenden

    Quietly spoke the Lord Ranbure,"Oblige Lord King with your signature".

    "Your name my liege, to be writ just here, a mere formality", laughed de Bere.

    "A stroke of the pen and the thing is done." murmured Sir Roger of Trumpington.

    "Done in a twinkling", sniffed de Guise.

    Said Stephen Langton, "Sign if you please!"

    So many people

    Egging him on

    I can t help feeling

    Sorry for John.

    Source(s): Teacher Training College Hereford 1965
  • jarod
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    Hugh Chesterman

  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • 1 decade ago

    Never heard it before (i live in the USA.) They are known as jingles in the dictionary; i remember a few growing up. You might try a search under "Jingles"; there might be a book maybe. (keep in mind that most of the poetry ever written--and jingles repeated--have never been published.)

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    no

Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.