Bandit Cue asked in PetsHorses · 10 years ago

question to Horse trainers?

I'm intending on going to college for "Horse Training and Horse Management" so I have a couple questions since that's a couple years down the road (i'm 21 and have to save up enough money to move).

1) Did you go to college for this or learn from someone, and how easy is it for you to find work with your level of horse training/how you were taught?

2) what area do you live in and how easy is it to find horse training jobs?

3) If this isn't too personal to ask, what's should I be expecting ROUGHLY to make on a monthly basis (if possible) as a horse trainer (I'll most likely end up in Montana or Colorado training western horses for multiple things)

4) Do you work somewhere, like at a boarding facility or big nice barn, or just on individual horses at a time, or have people bring horses to your place in which you train them on your property?

5) Is horse training an ok full time profession if your married (so you have 2 sources of income) or what else do you recommend as a side job? I'd like to buy like peoples young horses that they don't have time for and sell for cheap, and train it to be good, however I don't see how my current 40 hrs a week could fit in in depth horse training, so do you guys have like part time jobs or what?

Thank you so much, I hope that these aren't too personal, I really just need advice from people in the field on what I should be planning for (yes I know I will prob be poor, but I'm sacrificing that haha)

4 Answers

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  • Finley
    Lv 7
    10 years ago
    Best Answer

    1) I got certified & study every trainer I find credible. BUT the biggest teacher has been the horse. Each horse teaches me something every day.

    It took me about a year to where enough people found me that I started to make a real living. I still consider myself a "basic foundation" trainer, so I'm not of any discipline and this has brought people who are having all kinds of problems to ask me for help. They are usually trail riders, backyard horse owners. Not show people.

    ______________________________________

    2) what area do you live in and how easy is it to find horse training jobs?

    MY ANSWER: I live on the west coast. I am a freelance trainer. I didn't "find" my job. It found me. I started helping people at the barn where I boarded my horses and other people found out about me and that's how I've gotten more clients. I also did a few demos and clinics.

    There are no horse training jobs available, unless you work under a trainer as an assistant. You have to make your own job happen if you want to make any money at all.

    If you are good and you care, word will get around and you'll succeed.

    It's about how you present yourself and your ideas and that they work for various people. And how good your people skills are. You have to be a good teacher and get your ideas across, because you're not just training the horse....you are really training the owners.

    ______________________________________________

    3) If this isn't too personal to ask, what's should I be expecting ROUGHLY to make on a monthly basis (if possible) as a horse trainer (I'll most likely end up in Montana or Colorado training western horses for multiple things)

    MY ANSWER: There is no answer to this. It depends on what kind of trainer you end up being. If you are good at what you do...you'll make plenty to live on. You can make a middle class income of $30,000 a year or more if you are good and keep busy.

    You can make barely chump change if you don't know how to present yourself or if you are impatient and don't want to starve that first year when no one knows your name.

    Some trainers who train for other trainers and end up training on their own in different disciplines can make closer to $100,000 a year.

    It also depends on what you're willing to do to invest in your training education.

    Will you be a competitor? Will you choose to be a WP or a dressage trainer? Or basic foundation or hunter jumper or a riding instructor or what?

    LOCATION LOCATION LOCATION. If you live and work in a poor lower class area, you're not going to make as much vs living and working in a middle or upper class area.

    that's the difference between charging $10-$25 an hour and charging $45-$75 or more an hour.

    _________________________________________

    4) Do you work somewhere, like at a boarding facility or big nice barn, or just on individual horses at a time, or have people bring horses to your place in which you train them on your property?

    MY ANSWER: I'm freelance. I don't have a barn. I board my own horses and I travel to each clients' barn. I don't have to deal with the politics of barn owners and the other trainers there. I'm no "threat" to them, because I'm not interested in "taking over" their barn.

    _________________________________________

    5) Is horse training an ok full time profession if your married (so you have 2 sources of income) or what else do you recommend as a side job?

    MY ANSWER: I dunno. I'm not married. I think if you're going to be a real horse trainer, you have to do it full time. Because it's not just the horses, it's the people you are training most of all. Problems come from people, not horses. Horses catch on quick. People take time. So, training them takes time. And having a side job, can mean you are just a part time trainer, which is fine....but you won't have the time to dedicate to your clients as you would if you were full time and that will mean the difference between making a true living as a trainer and making extra money as a hobby trainer.

    _______________________________________

    I'd like to buy peoples young horses that they don't have time for and sell for cheap, and train it to be good, however I don't see how my current 40 hrs a week could fit in in depth horse training, so do you guys have like part time jobs or what?

    MY ANSWER:

    This is unrealistic. You're going to go in debt fast. There's no $ in it. This idea would be more of a hobby

  • Anonymous
    10 years ago

    Reality is that the only places that a college degree in equestrian studies will get you hired are upscale barn manager positions. In my honest opinion it's not worth the money. Frankly college trained trainers aren't that good and if they are, they were good before they got to the college. There is a huge flaw in the existing programs. So that aside, I will answer your questions as closely as i can:

    1) I was taught and learned from my parents (professional racehorse and show horse trainers), a working student position with olympic medalist in dressage, some books, and from years of learning from the horses I was training. I've never had trouble getting hired as a trainer after I have been observed riding. My mom is a British Horse Society certified instructor, I have not had the opportunity to do this, but HIGHLY recommend it if you can, though I don't think western is offered... Maybe the American Riding Instructors Assoc. has it?

    2) I live in the southeastern US. It's rather hard to find this type of work now. The economy and poor industry management has wrecked the horse industry. But there are TONS of horses needing re-training and most people want to have it done, it's just a matter of affordability.

    3) Can't answer for MT or CO and western training. I do OTTB, problem horses, endurance, and jumpers. You make the most from boarders, on site training, and lessons, not really from buy/reselling- that used to be profitable about 10 yrs ago but has really diminished as an income source.

    4) I tried working at a barn, but didn't like it. I have since stuck to training on my own property and giving lessons. Used to board, but I moved and don't have as much space now. Tried training at the horse's owners place, but there are too many drawbacks especially if the owner is one of the horse's problems- if you take the horse to your place to train it then insist on the owner taking a few lessons so the problem doesn't' occur again.

    5) We are very very industrious! I used to have a part time hourly job (20 hrs/wk) and train the rest of the time, but finally decided to go back to college in a medical field and now work 4 days a week and ride 3. The awesome paycheck is worth it and I can enjoy my horses more instead of feeling pressured to make the bills. I wouldn't like putting the pressure on my spouse to hold us up when the holidays come around and everybody decides the horse's training can wait till spring. Winter is a bad income time in the horse business. On the flip side, when I'm not at the barn, I always wish I was. :-D

    Good luck, hope to have helped.

  • Mel
    Lv 6
    10 years ago

    Here are answers to a few

    I could care less about what degree or certification a trainer has, I want to see what kind of results they can achieve, and equine studies programs just cannot gaurantee that. I have looked into them and have observed what they do, not enough to make a trainer in my opinion if the skills and background aren't already there.

    Having your own facility is ideal or a main facility you have use of. As you get more experience, you will understand that every minute of the horse's day affects the training process, not just the hour spent riding it so having the ability to manage this is important. Plus, clients may not have ideal facilities to work in, and it takes up time travelling to and fro. The trainers who really are able to make a living at it generally have their own facilities or work out of a single barn, where clients bring and leave their horses for varying amounts of time, 30 days or more.

    Buying and reselling horses these days is not what it used to be. Unless you already have a very respected name in the horse world and are thus able to really market, you are going to lose money or break even if lucky.

  • 10 years ago

    1) everything i learned i got from experience growing up on a ranch i was taught by my mother and many friends of the family in the horse world with that experience i got the ranch working horse and the show horse training experience

    2) well i live in rual oregon surrounded by ranches so the ranchers train there own horses, so i train my own horses i will work with youngsters who want help though I love that

    3)well my friend charges 25.00 a hr, and requires the horse to be boarded at his barn i don't know his bordering cost

    4)no i dont do it for a living just training the ranch horses actually getting ready to go pick up a new cramello gelding my mom just bought thats green broke! cant wait

    5)horse training is a wonderful career the friends i have that do it make good money and have good repuatations i belive thats were the money is made you have to have a good rep in the horse world if you ever get a bad rep it will ruin you.

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