wher did the sur name brumfield orginate from?

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  • 1 decade ago
    Best Answer

    I found this information for you.

    Surname: Brumfield

    This interesting surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and is a locational name from any of the places called "Bromfield" in Cumberland and Shropshire, or "Broomfield" in Essex, Kent and Somerset. Bromfield in Cumberland is recorded as "Brumfeld" in 1145, and that in Shropshire as "Brunfelde" in the Domesday Book of 1086. The places called Broomfield in Essex, Kent and Somerset appear in the Domesday Book of 1086 as "Brumfelda", "Brumfeld" and "Brunfelle", respectively. All of these places share the same meaning and derivation, which is "(place at) the broom-covered open land", derived from the Olde English pre 7th Century "brom" meaning broom or gorse, with "feld" open country, land free from wood. One, William atte Bromeld appears in the 1296 Subsidy Rolls of Sussex and John de Bromfeld is noted in the 1327 Subsidy Rolls of Suffolk. The modern surname can be found as Bromfield, Broomfield and Brumfield. Jane, daughter of Richard Brumfield, was christened on February 21st 1612 at St. Dunstan's Church, Stepney, London and on May 24th 1635, Alice daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth Brumfield, was christened at St. Mary Whitechapel, Stepney. A Coat of Arms granted to the family is gold, on a red bend three silver mullets, the Crest being a blue pheon. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Hamo de Bromfeld which was dated 1275, in the "Hundred Rolls of Kent", during the reign of King Edward 1st, "The Hammer of the Scots", 1272-1307. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

    Hope this helps.

  • 1 decade ago

    From Rootsweb.com:

    "England/Scotland/Wales: BRUMFIELD The surname was recorded in Cumberland where they were seated from ancient times. some say well before the Norman Conquest and the arrival of Duke William at Hastings in 1066 A.D

    The complete history not only includes in full colour the most ancient family name coat of arms but traces the surname origin back to the 11th or 12th century, including any nobility, titles,castles,branches in Europe, settler's around the world and many other recorded events pertaining to the family surname if available. "

    Ancestry.com: "Brumfield is a variation of "Broomfield: English: habitational name from any of the places named with Old English brom ‘broom’, ‘gorse’ + feld ‘open country’, for example Broomfield in Essex, Kent, and Somerset, or Bromfield in Cumberland and Shropshire."

    Ancesty.com also charts the origin of names from census records Brumfield's immigrated from Scotland, England (primarily Lincolshire, next is Yorkshire but also in the surrounding counties) and Germany. Immigration between 1855 and 1870 shows only three families so it seems a lot of the Brumfields in the U.S. have been here a long time.

    This is supported by the following " Henry Bromfield settled in Boston 1766, Mark Bromfield Viginia 1645, James Bromfield New England 1758 and John Broomfield Viginia 1774" All of these are variations of the the name and were from England.

    In 1840, 15-24 families lived in Kentucky with 6-14 living in each of the surrounding states. By 1880 there were 139-275 families in Louisiana and Mississippi. In 1920 they continued in these states as well as West Virginia. They seem to mostly be farmers, but that's not unusual for the 1800's.

    Despite being predominately in the Southern States they fought on both sides of the Civil War, 71 Confederate and 69 Union.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Brumfield

    Last name origin & meaning:

    English: variant spelling of Broomfield.

    +

    Broomfield

    Last name origin & meaning:

    English: habitational name from any of the places named with Old English brōm ‘broom’, ‘gorse’ + feld ‘open country’, for example Broomfield in Essex, Kent, and Somerset, or Bromfield in Cumberland and Shropshire.

  • 4 years ago

    How did the black Brumfields get their name?

    • Randall4 years agoReport

      I know my great great grand father had a slave. I would imagine he took his name.

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