Is there any solid proof for the claim that simplified Chinese reduced the illiterate rate in China?

Fact 1 --- the illiterate rate in 1950s in China was 85%, and it is about 15% now (2011). With the fact 1, many (scholars or Chinese government) claim that the simplified Chinese character system was the key cause for the reduction of illiterate rate in China. Fact 2 --- the percentage of population attended... show more Fact 1 --- the illiterate rate in 1950s in China was 85%, and it is about 15% now (2011).
With the fact 1, many (scholars or Chinese government) claim that the simplified Chinese character system was the key cause for the reduction of illiterate rate in China.

Fact 2 --- the percentage of population attended school in 1950s in China was less than 15%, and it is over 90% today (2011).

With the fact 2, the fact 1 is the direct result of fact 2. The reduction of illiterate rate is wholly caused by the increased school attending rate, and it has nothing to do with the simplified Chinese character system.

Fact 3 --- Taiwan uses traditional system and has lower illiterate rate than China now (2011).
Update: bryan_q said, "Because with Traditional Chinese writing you can trace the composition of the character back to it's original or at least up until the Middle Chinese period [between the Sui and the Ming periods: between the years 581-1368 CE] to see the original meaning. Example: 软, can't be trace further with... show more bryan_q said, "Because with Traditional Chinese writing you can trace the composition of the character back to it's original or at least up until the Middle Chinese period [between the Sui and the Ming periods: between the years 581-1368 CE] to see the original meaning. Example: 软, can't be trace further with Simplified characters. But with Traditional Chinese you can, somewhat. 软, derived from 軟, was a variant form of 輭. 輭 = 車[vehicle; coach, cart]+而[originally, the picture of a man's beard: a man's beard in ancient China was very long: therefore the meaning of long could be used for 而]+大[a person lying flat on the ground, with arms and legs spread out: relaxing. So, 大, not just mean "big; great", but also "relaxed person"]. 輭 , then means 'a vehicle or coach for which a person can relax in, with enough room inside for a lot of things'."


Very interesting. Did you get your idea from the webpage below?

http://www.chineseetymology.com/exhibite.php
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