Trinitarians what is your understanding of Psalms 45:6(NIV)?

"Your throne, O God, will last for ever and ever; a scepter of justice will be the scepter of your kingdom." The NIV's footnote for this vs says the following: "Here the king is addressed as God’s REPRESENTATIVE."(emphasis added) So if this is the understanding, when Paul quotes this... show more "Your throne, O God, will last for ever and ever; a scepter of justice will be the scepter of your kingdom."

The NIV's footnote for this vs says the following:
"Here the king is addressed as God’s REPRESENTATIVE."(emphasis added)

So if this is the understanding, when Paul quotes this vs in Hebrews 1:8 how do you CHANGE the meaning to Jesus as him being God himself! By calling Jesus God in Hebrews wouldn't that make the King of Israel God as well since Ps 45:6 was originally applied to the King?
Update: ***SEEKER***

Are you sure about that? Than the NIV translators must be wrong too!
Update 2: ***Peacelily*** Thanks for your response but I think that you're a little off course here cause not only the NIV translators disagree with you but also the NET as well. In fact the NET translators make the following comment on this vs: "...it is preferable to retain the text and take this statement as another... show more ***Peacelily***

Thanks for your response but I think that you're a little off course here cause not only the NIV translators disagree with you but also the NET as well. In fact the NET translators make the following comment on this vs:

"...it is preferable to retain the text and take this statement as another instance of the royal hyperbole that permeates the royal psalms. Because the Davidic king is God’s vice-regent on earth, the psalmist addresses him as if he were God incarnate."
Update 3: ***Peacelily*** Yes you are and here is why: NAB translation, footnote for Heb 1:8 - "O God: the application of the name “God” to the Son derives from the preexistence mentioned in Hebrews 1:2–3; the psalmist had already used it of the Hebrew king in the court style of the original. NAB translation, footnote... show more ***Peacelily***

Yes you are and here is why:


NAB translation, footnote for Heb 1:8 -
"O God: the application of the name “God” to the Son derives from the preexistence mentioned in Hebrews 1:2–3; the psalmist had already used it of the Hebrew king in the court style of the original.

NAB translation, footnote for Ps 45:6 -
"O god: the king, in courtly language, is called “god,” i.e., more than human, representing God to the people. Hebrews 1:8–9 applies Psalm 45:7–8 to Christ."

Heb 1:8 -
"Psalm 45 is a wedding song, originally describing a king of Israel, but later understood by the rabbis as messianic. The contrast between a royal personage and his servant-companions is the point of the quotation. This king is addressed twice as God." (Stedman, Ray C.: Hebrews)


NAB translation, footnote for Heb 1:8 -
"O God: the application of the name “God” to the Son derives from the preexistence mentioned in Hebrews 1:2–3; the psalmist had already used it of the Hebrew king in the court styl
Update 4: ***Peacelily*** Yes you are and here is why: NAB translation, footnote for Heb 1:8 - "O God: the application of the name “God” to the Son derives from the preexistence mentioned in Hebrews 1:2–3; the psalmist had already used it of the Hebrew king in the court style of the original. NAB translation, footnote... show more ***Peacelily***

Yes you are and here is why:


NAB translation, footnote for Heb 1:8 -
"O God: the application of the name “God” to the Son derives from the preexistence mentioned in Hebrews 1:2–3; the psalmist had already used it of the Hebrew king in the court style of the original.

NAB translation, footnote for Ps 45:6 -
"O god: the king, in courtly language, is called “god,” i.e., more than human, representing God to the people. Hebrews 1:8–9 applies Psalm 45:7–8 to Christ."

Heb 1:8 -
"Psalm 45 is a wedding song, originally describing a king of Israel, but later understood by the rabbis as messianic. The contrast between a royal personage and his servant-companions is the point of the quotation. This king is addressed twice as God." (Stedman, Ray C.: Hebrews)


NAB translation, footnote for Heb 1:8 -
"O God: the application of the name “God” to the Son derives from the preexistence mentioned in Hebrews 1:2–3; the psalmist had already used it of the Hebrew king in the court styl
Update 5: style of the original. See the note on Psalm 45:6. It is also important for the author’s christology that in Hebrews 1:10–12 an Old Testament passage addressed to God is redirected to Jesus." NAB translation, footnote for Ps 45:6 - "O god: the king, in courtly language, is called “god,” i.e., more than human,... show more style of the original. See the note on Psalm 45:6. It is also important for the author’s christology that in Hebrews 1:10–12 an Old Testament passage addressed to God is redirected to Jesus."

NAB translation, footnote for Ps 45:6 -
"O god: the king, in courtly language, is called “god,” i.e., more than human, representing God to the people. Hebrews 1:8–9 applies Psalm 45:7–8 to Christ."

Heb 1:8 -
"Psalm 45 is a wedding song, originally describing a king of Israel, but later understood by the rabbis as messianic. The contrast between a royal personage and his servant-companions is the point of the quotation. This king is addressed twice as God." (Stedman, Ray C.: Hebrews)

Ps 45:6 -
"Ps. 45:7, 8. In order to avoid the addressing of the king with the word Elohim, v. 6a has been interpreted, (1) “Thy throne of God is for ever and ever,”—a rendering which is grammatically possible . . . But might אלהים [God] by any possibility be even addressed to the king who is here celebrated? . . . E
Update 6: Elsewhere earthly authorities are also called אלהים [God], Ex. 21:6; 22:7f., Ps. 82, cf. 138:1, because they are God’s representatives and the bearers of His image upon earth, so the king who is celebrated in this Psalm may be all the more readily styled Elohim [God]." (Delitzsch, Franz: Commentary on the Old... show more Elsewhere earthly authorities are also called אלהים [God], Ex. 21:6; 22:7f., Ps. 82, cf. 138:1, because they are God’s representatives and the bearers of His image upon earth, so the king who is celebrated in this Psalm may be all the more readily styled Elohim [God]." (Delitzsch, Franz: Commentary on the Old Testament)

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