Why should I *not* change treatment?

Re-asking my previous question, this time backed up by facts and graphs. http://ringbreak.dnd.utwente.nl/~mrjb/exercise.png (before meds) http://ringbreak.dnd.utwente.nl/~mrjb/amlodipin.png (3 weeks of 10mg amlodipin, daily) These are actual blood pressure graphs. The first graph shows my blood pressure on a... show more Re-asking my previous question, this time backed up by facts and graphs.

http://ringbreak.dnd.utwente.nl/~mrjb/ex... (before meds)
http://ringbreak.dnd.utwente.nl/~mrjb/am... (3 weeks of 10mg amlodipin, daily)

These are actual blood pressure graphs. The first graph shows my blood pressure on a regime of diet and exercise (approx 2 miles walking daily). Within a month, there's a very clear improvement in my blood pressure: At that point has essentially normalized.

The second graph shows my blood pressure whilst on amlodipin, which I've been taking daily to control my BP. Despite also being (a bit) more active and watching my sodium intake, I'm not actually seeing a significant improvement. In fact, my systolic pressure and heart rate actually seem to have gotten a bit worse. Side effects: Headaches.

I've been diligently taking my meds as adviced by my GP, but diet-and-exercise not only appears to be far more effective than meds, it's also free of side-effects (that is, all effects are desired).

Please explain to me like I'm a six-year old... Why shouldn't I drop the meds and swap to diet-and-exercise instead?
Update: I'm not trying to be a wise-crack. I'm just looking for the best possible treatment. When it comes to my health, I'd rather not put my trust in fairy tales.
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