Question about Reform Judaism membership...?

So many of you know me and I could use some more insight, this time not so much about Judaism in general but specifically Reform Judaism. I attend a Reform synagogue, where I am blessed to be welcome with absolutely open arms. My Rabbi is fully aware of the fact I am a fire-dancer for Fenris, that I have... show more So many of you know me and I could use some more insight, this time not so much about Judaism in general but specifically Reform Judaism.

I attend a Reform synagogue, where I am blessed to be welcome with absolutely open arms. My Rabbi is fully aware of the fact I am a fire-dancer for Fenris, that I have psycho-spiritual experiences that include 'visions' (for want of a better word) of Fenris and that I perform rituals in honor of Fenris -- though I do not believe in his literal existence. Nor do I believe in the literal existence of G-D, though I have profound moments of psycho-spiritual ecstacy when experiencing Jewish rituals.

So here's where I need the insight ---

Some members of the Synagogue I attend have been as strongly as a Jewish person would encourage such a thing (which means, gently and lovingly stated without being a command or even an imperative, as though just a thought) that I should consider conversion.

I understand that Reform Judaism is rather a bit more open to the diverse experiences of other religions than some of the other sects might be comfortable having their converts participating in. However, it feels as RIGHT an idea to me as it feels ODD.

SOOOOO...

My rambling aside, here's my question:

Knowing what you know of me, through my answers, my questions, and what I've said above, knowing I could not give up any of the wonderful experiences I have through the various rituals in which I participate, would you PERSONALLY feel comforable welcoming me not just as a fellow congregant at your Synagogue, but as a member of the Tribe?
Update: :) : I am an atheist. Notice my comments that I do not believe in the literal existence of Fenris or G-D. That's part of why this feels so odd to me -- To seem to be wanted as a member of the Tribe seems to me an odd thing being that I am an atheist and that I participate in rituals not exactly approved... show more :) :

I am an atheist. Notice my comments that I do not believe in the literal existence of Fenris or G-D.

That's part of why this feels so odd to me -- To seem to be wanted as a member of the Tribe seems to me an odd thing being that I am an atheist and that I participate in rituals not exactly approved by Torah or Tanakh.
Update 2: Quantrill: In all spiritual matter's, one's own feelings must be the core. However, it can often be very useful to see the world through another's eyes. Think of this not as me asking permission, but as me asking your view of the possibility. I am not what one would consider a customary Jew -- I... show more Quantrill:

In all spiritual matter's, one's own feelings must be the core. However, it can often be very useful to see the world through another's eyes.

Think of this not as me asking permission, but as me asking your view of the possibility. I am not what one would consider a customary Jew -- I could never give up my fire-dancing in honor of Fenris, for example. The experience is too powerful for me, too meaningful for me. But that to me does not in any way detract from how I feel when I participate in Jewish ceremony and modes of thought.

For all that though, as a culture and as a people, I feel very drawn towards Judaism. While I do rituals that would be far more Asatru or Lokean, I do not feel the same sort of 'kinship' with those rituals People that I feel when I share a Jewish ritual with Jewish People.

Makes little sense, I know. But I long ago gave up trying to fit my ecstatic experiences into anyone's boxes, even my own.

They just are.
Update 3: Yohannan:

Most technically, I don't worship anyone or anything at all.
Update 4: Cher: Ironic that you should mention it -- I recently started a year long course at the synagogue on Judaism. I got all kinds of weird stares when out of about thirty people, I was the only one who when asked why I was there, did not say "to convert." For me, it was a chance to go back and put... show more Cher:

Ironic that you should mention it -- I recently started a year long course at the synagogue on Judaism. I got all kinds of weird stares when out of about thirty people, I was the only one who when asked why I was there, did not say "to convert."

For me, it was a chance to go back and put all the underpinnings in place that should have been there BEFORE I ever read Sefer Zohar and Sefer Yetzirah.
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