• What would happene if someone slipped and died?

    What if someone slips from a building (4 stories) and dies? I was with the person but i couldnt do anything , i wasnt near him slipping. Would i be charged?
    What if someone slips from a building (4 stories) and dies? I was with the person but i couldnt do anything , i wasnt near him slipping. Would i be charged?
    9 answers · 1 week ago
  • How to spend the 4 hour train ride from Edinburgh to London?

    Is it ok to keep walking up and down the train? Would I get dirty looks?
    Is it ok to keep walking up and down the train? Would I get dirty looks?
    8 answers · 1 week ago
  • Fell on hard times.. need a small car to sleep in?

    Fell on hard times and need to move in to a car for a while. Looking for a small car that gets great gas mileage but also comfortable enough to sleep in. No SUV or van, small car only. Any suggestions?
    Fell on hard times and need to move in to a car for a while. Looking for a small car that gets great gas mileage but also comfortable enough to sleep in. No SUV or van, small car only. Any suggestions?
    8 answers · 1 week ago
  • How big are 0 gauge trains?

    Best answer: O gauge is twice OO.

    If they are built to scale, an O-gauge loco would be twice as long and twice as wide (and so eight times the volume) of an OO model of the same loco.
    Best answer: O gauge is twice OO.

    If they are built to scale, an O-gauge loco would be twice as long and twice as wide (and so eight times the volume) of an OO model of the same loco.
    4 answers · 1 week ago
  • Is audi awd better than range rover 4wd?

    8 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Is Train travel Amtrak a high profile danger? Or is driving your own car better for long trips?

    I am going on vacation, flying is not an option for me, so no need to go there bc I will ignore it. I am going to Miami next week, I am debating whether to drive or take the train from Los Angeles to Miami. I was planning on driving 10 hr a day alone. I would leave at 5am. So I won't get fatigue or tunnel... show more
    I am going on vacation, flying is not an option for me, so no need to go there bc I will ignore it. I am going to Miami next week, I am debating whether to drive or take the train from Los Angeles to Miami. I was planning on driving 10 hr a day alone. I would leave at 5am. So I won't get fatigue or tunnel vision I was thinking in taking a break every 2 hr(30 min) break. Then stop driving around 6pm and check in at a hotel and repeat the same thing for 3 days until I make to Miami. I feel I am more in control when I drive, cars don't derail either. If a take Amtrak I know I can rest, but it really scares me bc you have NO control whatsoever, trains derail and these are high profile accidents. A derailment will kill you. So I am not sure about Amtrak being safer then driving. My time is running out and I am stress out.
    11 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Underground railroad and tracks?

    Best answer: In many places .
    Did you have some other question a little more complete.?
    Best answer: In many places .
    Did you have some other question a little more complete.?
    5 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Does the need for traction account for part of the weight of railroad locomotives?

    Best answer: In theory, yes, a lighter weight locomotive could work with a gear type wheel and track. But not in actual practice. The weight of the locomotive comes from the size of the the engine needed to generate the HP needed to move a 130,000 ton train. And the size of the locomotive chassis needed to support such a... show more
    Best answer: In theory, yes, a lighter weight locomotive could work with a gear type wheel and track. But not in actual practice. The weight of the locomotive comes from the size of the the engine needed to generate the HP needed to move a 130,000 ton train. And the size of the locomotive chassis needed to support such a large engine leads to the heavy weight of the locomotive itself.

    Since your example is really a gear wheel riding on a gear track (rack and pinion in automotive terms), lubrication requirements would be massive. Lubricants today can't work under that much weight - they'd be squeezed out.
    4 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Does this train ticket have any value?

    Does this train ticket have any value?

    Best answer: It looks antique--from quite some time ago. It would only be of possible interest to people who collect old tickets, and given its poor condition, probably not even that.

    Sorry.
    Best answer: It looks antique--from quite some time ago. It would only be of possible interest to people who collect old tickets, and given its poor condition, probably not even that.

    Sorry.
    8 answers · 3 weeks ago
  • What becomes of railway sleepers once they are just taken out of use? What does the railway company who removes them do with them?

    Best answer: Perhaps not exactly what you're looking for, but in North America with most large carriers, contractors are hired to remove the old ties (sleepers) from the right of way for a low price, one or two dollars per tie. Sounds good but we are usually talking about many thousands of them at a whack. It is not... show more
    Best answer: Perhaps not exactly what you're looking for, but in North America with most large carriers, contractors are hired to remove the old ties (sleepers) from the right of way for a low price, one or two dollars per tie. Sounds good but we are usually talking about many thousands of them at a whack. It is not uncommon for ten miles or more of ties to be replaced by tie gangs at many differing locations each day.

    That is their sole function and they are away for many weeks at a time. No one ever talks or asks about them. But without 'em, no train is going anywhere. Ditto for the steel gangs that replace rail and the surfacing gangs that follow behind that spreads new ballast and levels it with laser beams and tamps it all up.

    How many tie gangs? Dozens or dozens of dozens, I have no idea. But it isn't a cottage industry. It's big business and we're talking many, many millions of dollars overall.

    The house I own was built in 1972 and the ties are still doing their job as retaining walls and fence posts. When I was raising sheep here not even the rams could hurt them, but the old phone polls for cross fencing the pasture didn't hold up for crap. At one time, both were treated with creosote. When I got out of the business the last ram wound up as mutton and true shish-ka-bob at a big party that was our wedding reception. A three day event... Still not sure who I married... But she seems nice...

    Then they sell the ties to hardware stores large and small for a few dollars more. Then someone buys from them and builds retaining walls, primarily, but there are dozens of uses for them as mentioned here. Then those customers pay anywhere between eight and twelve dollars or more each, depending on condition with the best ties commanding the highest price.

    As for new ties, which are usually oak treated with creosote, when I retired in 2000 were fetching $40 each to the railroads. They must be much more expensive today.

    Preservatives, like creosote, have leached out long before, which is why the railroad replaced them in the first place. But there can be residual traces left in cases, mostly benign and deep inside if present at all and not very toxic. If only they killed gophers too... I've been locked in mortal combat with the gopher from hell, and now his progeny, for 31 years. I tried one of those things resembling a fusee that you light on fire and stuff it into the gopher hole and cover with dirt. Not only did it not kill him, it pissed him off and the half burnt remains of the device was outside the gopher hole the next morning.

    Older now, presumably more wise, this summer, the unavoidable gauntlet having been thrown down, I'll spend spare time sipping tropical drinks, sitting in a favorite lawn chair under an umbrella, shotgun in hand, and when I see earth being turned up, right in front of me, as in the past, I'll blow 'em to smithereens...

    As for concrete ties, they last indefinitely. A boon to the carriers, but they have one major drawback. When wooden ties are in place, a single derailed wheel or an entire truck can cut wooden ties for many miles before derailing completely, causing a major pile-up. There are detectors that scan for a derailed wheel / truck every so many miles, with no standards set that I am aware of, but they're probably there. But ALL employees, regardless of craft are required to make a visual inspection of a train passing by. It is called a "roll by." Many times derailments didn't happen because they got noticed as a derailment that was in the making, before the train scattered all over hell and back.

    On the other hand, when a wheel hits a concrete tie, it basically explodes. Period. There is no mileage taken into account. The pile-up happens right then and there. No margin for detection beforehand whatsoever. You're in the ditch. Hopefully you brought a big lunch.

    And if anyone is thinking about taking some of those used wooden ties laying along the right of way, don't. With tracks nearby a pick-up truck with ties in it usually doesn't make it past the first police officer that sees them, and you better have a receipt.
    10 answers · 3 weeks ago
  • Why don't we have automated trains.?

    Apart from some small scale operations such as DLR in London. Why has the railway not been automated in any great scale? Companies are spending millions developing automated road vehicles. But wouldn't automated trains be rather simple? their route and events are a lot more fixed and predictable than that of a... show more
    Apart from some small scale operations such as DLR in London. Why has the railway not been automated in any great scale? Companies are spending millions developing automated road vehicles. But wouldn't automated trains be rather simple? their route and events are a lot more fixed and predictable than that of a road vehicle. Why aren't rail companies designing automated trains?
    6 answers · 3 weeks ago
  • Can a 16 year old travel on an Amtrak train alone?

    i have a few questions actually.. 1. can i travel by myself if I'm 16? 2. do i need an ID? 3. how much does it cost to go from Spokane WA to Seattle WA? 4. How do i buy a ticket? does it have to be online? or can i just buy a ticket at the station? I would really really appreciate an answer :D thanks
    i have a few questions actually.. 1. can i travel by myself if I'm 16? 2. do i need an ID? 3. how much does it cost to go from Spokane WA to Seattle WA? 4. How do i buy a ticket? does it have to be online? or can i just buy a ticket at the station? I would really really appreciate an answer :D thanks
    9 answers · 4 weeks ago
  • Does your city have light rail?

    14 answers · 4 weeks ago
  • Have you ever ridden a commuter railroad?

    like metro north, LIRR, MARC, metra, caltrain, etc
    like metro north, LIRR, MARC, metra, caltrain, etc
    8 answers · 4 weeks ago
  • How long would it take to build about a mile of railroad?

    Best answer: With modern equipment, a mile a day is reasonable for good tracks on level ground. All you need to get built is the grade and the culverts. If its high quality track, like high speed tracks, its far more labor intensive because it requires more precision. That 10 miles a day in the 1860s was awful track. It had... show more
    Best answer: With modern equipment, a mile a day is reasonable for good tracks on level ground. All you need to get built is the grade and the culverts.

    If its high quality track, like high speed tracks, its far more labor intensive because it requires more precision.

    That 10 miles a day in the 1860s was awful track. It had to be rebuilt almost as soon as it was used.
    8 answers · 4 weeks ago
  • Do hobos still ride the rails?

    Best answer: In recent decades, the traditional role of hobos as itinerant workers has fallen off, largely because of increasing prosperity. Most itinerant workers in modern times have automobiles and drive between jobs, alternatively they may use public transportation, and live in many types of temporary housing. ... show more
    Best answer: In recent decades, the traditional role of hobos as itinerant workers has fallen off, largely because of increasing prosperity. Most itinerant workers in modern times have automobiles and drive between jobs, alternatively they may use public transportation, and live in many types of temporary housing.

    Increasingly, as seasonal agricultural work became the province of illegal immigrants, and other seasonal work became increasingly lucrative, freighthopping became mainly used by the homeless population, by thrill seekers, youths who have adopted the lifestyle as an expression of rebellion against society, and people who enjoy traveling across the countryside under the open air.

    In recent years there has been an increase in crime targeted at the rail-riding homeless population and other freighthoppers by other itinerants. Retired Spokane police officer Bob Grandinetti attributes this largely to the rise of an itinerant group calling themselves the 'FTRA' or Freight Train Riders of America. Whether the FTRA is as violent as claimed by Grandinetti is in some dispute. Other increases in crime targeted at freighthoppers can be attributed to the general increase in violence and urban gang activity around train yards in such locations as Los Angeles.

    Another reason the practice is declining is because the nature of the way goods are being transported, with the traditional boxcar giving way to more secure plug door cars, and eventually shipping containers, which are not friendly to people riding.

    Even flatcars are becoming increasingly open, making life harder for Freighthoppers.

    Also, the close and decline of much of the rail network has made the practice less common.



    The Freight Train Riders of America (FTRA) is an American gang of homeless men who move about in railroad cars, particularly in the northwestern United States.

    The FTRA was founded by homeless veterans of the Vietnam War in a Montana bar in the 1980s.

    ****Update**** This question is one I've been asking myself for sometime. It's been kind of a fantasy of mine, to ride the rails for a few weeks, just to see where I end up. This is the reason I took a little time to research the subject. My answer was obviously taken from Wikipedia, but I am so thrilled to see the answers that followed, people that have the knowledge first hand. At this time, it doesn't seem to practical or safe to hitch a ride on the rails .... but I can still dream!
    10 answers · 1 month ago
  • I want to become a locomotive engineer?

    Best answer: YOu can choose any railroad at the location you wish to live at. Go to work in the operating department. that will be as a brakeman or switchman, that is the pathway to engineer. In time depending on manpower requirements, usually less than 5 years you will be offered a chance for promotion to engineer. ... show more
    Best answer: YOu can choose any railroad at the location you wish to live at.
    Go to work in the operating department. that will be as a brakeman or switchman, that is the pathway to engineer.
    In time depending on manpower requirements, usually less than 5 years you will be offered a chance for promotion to engineer.
    The training class is usually a bit less than a year, is quite intense but most people pass.
    Railroad business is forecast to increase over the foreseeable future, if you are furlughed temporarily dont despair, you will be recalled.
    It's not a prefect world, but it is a pretty good job, a bit stressful on family life but beats sitting in an office all day.
    Good Luck!
    7 answers · 1 month ago
  • Where does human waste go from planes, trains and boats?

    Best answer: On an aircraft it goes into a holding tank. It is then pumped at each airport during the unloading/loading of the plane. Sometimes during a "power turn" or when the flight is late, the tank wont get pumped and you'll be able to smell it during the flight. But its routine for every aircraft to be... show more
    Best answer: On an aircraft it goes into a holding tank. It is then pumped at each airport during the unloading/loading of the plane. Sometimes during a "power turn" or when the flight is late, the tank wont get pumped and you'll be able to smell it during the flight. But its routine for every aircraft to be pumped at all hubs, smaller cities it may not take the time unless they ask for it.

    Some aircrafts do have the option to dump the tanks if they need to lighten their load. They will do this over a body of water or open land if an emergency landing becomes necessary, they will dump the lav's and fuel in this case. Not every aircraft is able to dump the lav's but some can and wont do it over a populated area. Stories of getting chuncks of blue or green ice would be a result of a leaking tank.
    9 answers · 1 month ago