• How much do I need to enter south Korea?

    7 answers · 2 months ago
  • Is prostitution legal in South Korea?

    Best answer: Prostitution isn't legal in Korea, but it's generally accepted and the laws are not strictly enforced. In the old days there were places where you could go window shopping for prostitutes, but those places have all disappeared. Korea is reluctant to show its true face to the world, so whenever it's in... show more
    Best answer: Prostitution isn't legal in Korea, but it's generally accepted and the laws are not strictly enforced. In the old days there were places where you could go window shopping for prostitutes, but those places have all disappeared. Korea is reluctant to show its true face to the world, so whenever it's in the spotlight or whenever Koreans are expecting massive media coverage or an increase in visitors, they take pains to hide the prostitution, the dog meat industry, etc. Because they know foreigners will judge them for it.
    10 answers · 2 months ago
  • Why are Koreans so good at stuff?

    Korea has the highest average IQ (108) out of any country. They have the best go players, Star Craft 2 players, Leauge of Legends players. They have good baseball players, swimmers, weightlifters, archery, riflers. Kpop is also pretty popular as well Kdramas which I’m not personally a fan of but it’s popular. And... show more
    Korea has the highest average IQ (108) out of any country. They have the best go players, Star Craft 2 players, Leauge of Legends players. They have good baseball players, swimmers, weightlifters, archery, riflers. Kpop is also pretty popular as well Kdramas which I’m not personally a fan of but it’s popular. And they have only 50 million people in Korea. How do they do it?
    5 answers · 3 months ago
  • Why did Kim Jong Un's caretakers let him get so fat?

    What did they feed him in Switzerland?
    What did they feed him in Switzerland?
    10 answers · 4 months ago
  • If I’m 18 in the US and only have a green card, will I be forced to serve in the Korean military if I visit Korea for about 2 weeks?

    I was born in Korea and moved to the US when I was 8 years old
    I was born in Korea and moved to the US when I was 8 years old
    3 answers · 4 months ago
  • Is south korea a good country?

    10 answers · 4 months ago
  • What Latin American country do you like most?

    Best answer: Brazil
    Best answer: Brazil
    4 answers · 4 months ago
  • What does North Korean food taste like?

    11 answers · 5 months ago
  • What accent do you find to be sexy?

    Best answer: The French accent is the sexiest accent on the planet in my opinion.
    Best answer: The French accent is the sexiest accent on the planet in my opinion.
    9 answers · 5 months ago
  • I want to study in South Korea?

    Hi. I'm 17, and I want to study in South Korea. I am graduating high school this December, and I want to move to Korean next August. I was wondering how the process goes like? I'm pretty clueless about it right now. I do not know Korean (I know a little bit, and I'm in the process of learning it). I... show more
    Hi. I'm 17, and I want to study in South Korea. I am graduating high school this December, and I want to move to Korean next August. I was wondering how the process goes like? I'm pretty clueless about it right now. I do not know Korean (I know a little bit, and I'm in the process of learning it). I want to major in either fashion designing or music (or both). I was also wondering whether it's possible to do modeling on the side (I know that sounds ridiculous), but I am interested in it. Any advice on which universities to apply to? Thank you.
    5 answers · 5 months ago
  • If a mom and her 15 year old daughter want to move to Korea do they both need to have a korean visa are does only one of them have to have?

    Best answer: WANTING to move is one issue.
    KOREA decides if you can move in.

    Both will need to apply for VISAS. What does MOM offer Korea that it NEEDS?

    Korea Immigration Department has the answers to many of your questions.ONLINE
    http://www.immigration.go.kr/HP/IMM80/
    For a year or two is much easier than permanent.
    Best answer: WANTING to move is one issue.
    KOREA decides if you can move in.

    Both will need to apply for VISAS. What does MOM offer Korea that it NEEDS?

    Korea Immigration Department has the answers to many of your questions.ONLINE
    http://www.immigration.go.kr/HP/IMM80/
    For a year or two is much easier than permanent.
    4 answers · 5 months ago
  • How to convince people that the Toyota Land Cruiser is not a reliable SUV as it easily breaks down.....?

    Ford Expedition and Chevy Suburban are a way better choice
    Ford Expedition and Chevy Suburban are a way better choice
    11 answers · 5 months ago
  • Do you need a Korean visa to visit Korea cuz me and my mom are planning on visiting this summer for three weeks and we don't have one?

    Best answer: Why is your mother leaving it up to her 15 year old child to determine whether or not it will be necessary to procure visas before attempting to enter a foreign country? If you both hold a US passport then the answer is "No, you will not need to apply for a visa beforehand - Americans are granted a 90 day... show more
    Best answer: Why is your mother leaving it up to her 15 year old child to determine whether or not it will be necessary to procure visas before attempting to enter a foreign country? If you both hold a US passport then the answer is "No, you will not need to apply for a visa beforehand - Americans are granted a 90 day tourist visa upon arrival." But that's really something that the adult in the situation ought to be looking into, not you.
    3 answers · 5 months ago
  • What does it mean when a culture embraces food so much?

    Over the recent years, South Korea has been embracing food A LOT; it seems like food, eating, and satisfying their taste buds have become Koreans' priority in life. There are Korean TV programs and YouTubers where people just eat food in front of the cameras for audience's satisfaction. And they eat A LOT... show more
    Over the recent years, South Korea has been embracing food A LOT; it seems like food, eating, and satisfying their taste buds have become Koreans' priority in life. There are Korean TV programs and YouTubers where people just eat food in front of the cameras for audience's satisfaction. And they eat A LOT too, like this one Youtuber ate ten bags of noodles in one sitting all alone!! I have just been wondering, what do you think it means when a culture embraces food so much? Maybe since Koreans are so stressed from work and crazy advanced education, they turned to food to lessen the stress in life? What are your opinions? Professional or just personal opinions will be equally respected. :)
    4 answers · 6 months ago
  • Is North Korea s request to meeting with Trump sincere? Or the ultimate stall tactic as they keep moving towards having nuclear weapons.?

    Best answer: Well, it's certainly not a stall tactic designed to enable them to move towards having nuclear weapons because they already have nuclear weapons - their first nuclear test took place in 2006. It's definitely a ploy to stall for time as they seem to have realised that the Trump administration has... show more
    Best answer: Well, it's certainly not a stall tactic designed to enable them to move towards having nuclear weapons because they already have nuclear weapons - their first nuclear test took place in 2006.

    It's definitely a ploy to stall for time as they seem to have realised that the Trump administration has prioritised dealing with North Korea. It is a well-known and established fact that Trump has decided that his legacy will rest on what happens with North Korea during his presidency. He made it clear that if he had to resort to war to deal with the problem, that he would be willing to do so. The North Koreans seem convinced of his sincerity in that regard and are taking steps to prevent their obliteration.

    It could all come to nothing, they could meet and both sides could come away from the talks without any agreement being reached, in which case it's really a win-win for both parties. The North Koreans will come off as having tried to come to an understanding, and the Americans will come off as being open to diplomacy without their usual heavy-handedness and rigid preconditions, and of course both sides will get a lot of points for those efforts. It's a win for the North Koreans because it buys them time and it could lead to a narrowing of the rift between them and the rest of the world, and it's a win for the Americans because it shows the rest of the world that even after nearly 70 years of war, they're capable of sitting down and attempting to hammer out an arrangement.

    In reality, it's a bad thing for the South, Russia, and China.

    While South Korea certainly doesn't want war, if the US and North Korea were to do the unthinkable and sign a non-aggression pact that could pave the way for a formal peace treaty ending the Korean War, it would be the first step down the road to North Korea being seen as a legitimate sovereign nation and not simply a rogue state. The Normalisation of relations with the United States, possibly including diplomatic relations and possibly even a trade agreement could seriously impede any progress on reunification of the peninsula.

    While North Korea has managed to limp along this far, it's unlikely that with US pressure on them nonstop that they'd manage to eke out another 70 years of independence. But if things improve up there, they could manage to lay enough of a foundation to weather whatever storms may come, and they might come to see the South as an economic rival and not only an ideological one. That would be a very distressing development for the Korean people as a whole.

    China certainly wouldn't be thrilled if the US and North Korea started becoming chummy. They rely on Kim's antics to keep the US distracted and they need to be able to show North Korea as an example of how the United States is willing to economically strangle a nation if its leaders refuse to play ball, even if that means inflicting terrible suffering on the populace. Plus, without an aggressive, vehemently anti-American North Korea, China loses a strategic ally in its fight for dominance in the region. The Chinese wouldn't know what to do if North Korea suddenly became friendly to US interests, it could even mean that American troops might have access to territory directly abutting China. That's a very big fear for them.

    The Russians wouldn't like it either for many of the same reasons, but also because the dissolution of the bad blood between the DPRK and the USA could lead to a serious scramble for influence in the emerging markets of North Korea and Russia doesn't have any cards to play in that game unless the Americans are wholly and completely unwelcome at the table.

    Even Japan might be of two minds about the whole thing... They certainly would feel relieved that the threat of war would lessen, but then they wouldn't have the valid excuse to conduct the military build-ups that they want to get on with, because without the excuse of North Korea being seen as a threat, it would be obvious that the development of the Japanese forces would be happening solely to counter China. And while they might also breathe a sigh of relief that Korean reunification would be pushed onto the back burner for the foreseeable future, they might also be a bit worried that the US could decide to exploit North Korea at Japan's expense - i.e.: they could have the North Koreans doing things to make the US money or to provide Americans with goods for far less money than they could pay the Japanese.

    My gut feeling tells me that they'll make a big to-do of these talks but that little of substance will come from any of it. In the immediate aftermath, the rhetoric will probably die down, the US will grudgingly admit that to scale down its exercises wouldn't be out of the question (as the North Koreans are already aware of what the US can do), and the North Koreans will probably grudgingly admit that they don't need to test any more missiles or nuclear weapons (as it has already been established that they have long-range rocket technology and nuclear weapons to pair with them.)

    And you know what? That's a pretty good place to start actually. Let's remain cautiously optimistic.
    3 answers · 7 months ago