• Why does Japan allow the sun to rise so early without moving the clock time an hour ahead?

    Best answer: Daylight savings time (DST) is not as prevalent as you think and it would surprise you to know not all of the US, Asia, Middle East, and S. America use DST. It is precisely because it gets VERY hot during the summer that the Japanese do not like a longer day with the sun out. Frolicking out in the hot summer sun is... show more
    Best answer: Daylight savings time (DST) is not as prevalent as you think and it would surprise you to know not all of the US, Asia, Middle East, and S. America use DST. It is precisely because it gets VERY hot during the summer that the Japanese do not like a longer day with the sun out. Frolicking out in the hot summer sun is not a favorite pastime. But they will do that in the cold weather.

    And not only does it get very uncomfortably hot in the summer, there is also an old cultural stigma associated with having a tan. Traditionally, being tanned or having a very dark complexion marks you as a member of the lower class (peasants) because only they did manual labor out in the sun. There was a time not long ago that you would see many Japanese women using parasols to keep the sun off their exposed skin.

    As for why DST was discontinued, there are several reasons although not any of them are definitive. When Japan surrendered at the end of WW2, Allied Occupational Forces instituted DST because of the wrecked infrastructure and electrical power along with many other things were in severe shortage. However, DST was instituted without much debate or discussion and it came to be seen as an order and therefore associated with Occupation period after WW2, so when the Occupation ended, the Japanese ended DST within a month. Even today, you find Japanese websites that rants about it with such slogans as "Daylight-savings time is facist..."

    The Japanese Ministry of Education also claims that having more daylight would cause school children to stay out too long and neglect their studies. Not sure why this would matter during the summer time.

    Sundown to the Japanese also has a psychologist inference that it's time to relax; time to leave work, go out drinking, go have fun, etc. If you people watch in Japan, you can actually see a difference in their body language after sundown - they do seem more relaxed even when walking.

    As for traditional Japanese going to shrine early, most Japanese today don't go to shrines except on special occasions. And since those shrines are outdoors and no air condition, it's not a popular thing during the hot summer.
    5 answers · 2 days ago
  • English teaching institution in Tokyo?

    Is there any English teaching institution in Tokyo that I can go to study English? Not for a student but publics, for both online & offline courses
    Is there any English teaching institution in Tokyo that I can go to study English? Not for a student but publics, for both online & offline courses
    5 answers · 4 days ago
  • I have a silly question about going overseas, say I have a flight from L.A. leaving on Tuesday the 19th that leaves L.A. to Osaka Japan?

    and the departure date is the 29th. Would that be the 29th US time or the 29th Japan time?
    and the departure date is the 29th. Would that be the 29th US time or the 29th Japan time?
    11 answers · 1 week ago
  • Is Airbnb worth the risk in Japan?

    Best answer: Now it is, there is a new regulation that the unit is licensed by the Japanese government. After the announcement 80% of the listings dropped off AirBNB Good luck
    Best answer: Now it is, there is a new regulation that the unit is licensed by the Japanese government. After the announcement 80% of the listings dropped off AirBNB Good luck
    4 answers · 1 week ago
  • Heu... Some nice hotel near Shinjuku-Tokyo you will recommend...?

    Best answer: Low end-I have stayed at the Kabukicho Toyokan Inn and that was no big deal despite the raffish reputation of Kabukicho. Presumably, foreigners get a sort of a discount by staying there because most Japanese people wouldn't be caught dead in that part of Shinjuku. Kabukicho was handy because I wanted to imbibe... show more
    Best answer: Low end-I have stayed at the Kabukicho Toyokan Inn and that was no big deal despite the raffish reputation of Kabukicho. Presumably, foreigners get a sort of a discount by staying there because most Japanese people wouldn't be caught dead in that part of Shinjuku. Kabukicho was handy because I wanted to imbibe after-hours in the Golden Gai and Kabukicho is an easy walk from the Gai. Medium-The Shinjuku Washington is comfy just as all Washington Hotels are. High end-Hilton Hotel Shinjuku. The thing of it is, it's easy to get all around Tokyo, so there's no need to feel like you need to stay in Shinjuku unless you are a nightcrawler. A lot of the good deals seem to be on the east side of town. Asakusa is backpacker central these days. Kayabachō is another neighborhood with some good deals on hotels.
    5 answers · 1 week ago
  • Tokyo’s weather and what to wear ?

    hey guys i’m going to travel to tokyo next week and i was wondering what’s the weather like at the beginning of june and what kind of clothes should i bring its my first time so any advice would be helpful .
    hey guys i’m going to travel to tokyo next week and i was wondering what’s the weather like at the beginning of june and what kind of clothes should i bring its my first time so any advice would be helpful .
    9 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • What will happen to the currently existing Shinkansen line between Osaka-Nagoya-Tokyo once the new Maglev train line is completed?

    Best answer: The new line is called Chuo, not Tokaido (which is the name of the old line). As the name indicates, the Chuo line takes a shortcut through the hinterlands. It is not at all the same path as the Tokaido line, which goes all along the coast and makes detours to catch some additional cities. This means that people... show more
    Best answer: The new line is called Chuo, not Tokaido (which is the name of the old line). As the name indicates, the Chuo line takes a shortcut through the hinterlands. It is not at all the same path as the Tokaido line, which goes all along the coast and makes detours to catch some additional cities.
    This means that people who used to take the Nozomi will take the Chuo instead, but the Hikari and Kodama will still be full.
    7 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Do people that live in Kyoto or Nara or even Kobe travel to Osaka for work? Is that feasible?

    Best answer: Yes, all feasible. From Himeji to Osaka it takes about an hour and a half between station to station according to a map app. Kyoto-Osaka is also feasible depend on the location. So is Nara-Osaka. Of course, It would be tiring. However, some workers, even if few workers, actually commute between such distance.... show more
    Best answer: Yes, all feasible.
    From Himeji to Osaka it takes about an hour and a half between station to station according to a map app.
    Kyoto-Osaka is also feasible depend on the location. So is Nara-Osaka.
    Of course, It would be tiring.
    However, some workers, even if few workers, actually commute between such distance.
    I've heard of it.

    I don't know the American location, so don't know they are like from New Port Beach to Hollyood, but
    I'm sure you will have terrible experience that you are caned in the train everyday morning.
    6 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • What are good homestay gifts for Japanese families?

    Best answer: Give them something that is local to Colorado or the US; meaning things they are not likely to find anywhere else. The Japanese are huge foodies, so foods or drinks are a big hit. If you ever been to Hawaii which is a favorite Japanese tourist spot, you see lots of Japanese tourists buying prepackaged food items... show more
    Best answer: Give them something that is local to Colorado or the US; meaning things they are not likely to find anywhere else.

    The Japanese are huge foodies, so foods or drinks are a big hit. If you ever been to Hawaii which is a favorite Japanese tourist spot, you see lots of Japanese tourists buying prepackaged food items to take back home as gifts. Some favorite or popular items I've seen are gourmet coffee and candy (especially chocolate), microwave popcorn (this one I don't understand), and fruit jams (especially fruits not native to Japan). The Japanese drink lots of tea and coffee, but tea is something they can get easily and the quality is much better than those in the US. Coffee on the other hand seems to be a sure hit.

    Another item is wine/liquor, but you need to understand not every Japanese are into alcoholic drinks. The older generation really love it them as gifts, but that has changed over the generations.

    Two VERY important points: presentation is everything - meaning wrap the gifts before you give them out. Just handing out unwrap gifts leaves a very bad impression. However, TSA are kind of anal retentive when it comes to people carrying wrapped items on board an airline and they have the authority to unwrap anything they want and they are not responsible for re-wrapping them. So you need to be prepared to (re)-wrap the gifts when you arrive in Japan and before you give them out.
    4 answers · 3 weeks ago
  • Does Japan have places that are called castles?

    Best answer: The suffix -jō 城 indicates that the word it is appended to is the name of a specific castle. A castle is built to protect a specific town or vital strategic location and that castle is usually named after the town or the geographical location name. To distinguish between the castle from the town (or place), -jō... show more
    Best answer: The suffix -jō 城 indicates that the word it is appended to is the name of a specific castle. A castle is built to protect a specific town or vital strategic location and that castle is usually named after the town or the geographical location name. To distinguish between the castle from the town (or place), -jō 城 used after the name. Think Notthingham (the city) and Notthingham Castle.
    3 answers · 4 weeks ago
  • Why are there no birds in Japan?

    14 answers · 1 month ago
  • Is it realistically possible to learn Japanese?

    Best answer: Yes. Many people do. Take for instance my roommate in college who was from a small town in Texas where the schools K-12 did not offer Japanese language classes, so he bought some books, Rosetta Stone lessons, and used the internet when he was in high school. When he got to college where Japanese language studies... show more
    Best answer: Yes. Many people do. Take for instance my roommate in college who was from a small town in Texas where the schools K-12 did not offer Japanese language classes, so he bought some books, Rosetta Stone lessons, and used the internet when he was in high school. When he got to college where Japanese language studies were offered, he studied it for 4 years during undergraduate. By his junior year, he was reading Japanese newspaper and cracking jokes in Japanese.

    If you have the will, you will find a way. Leaning a foreign language at a very young age have its advantage, but it is still possible for someone older to reach fluency although it will not be as easy and requires dedication. The writing system (especially, kanji) is difficult for westerners because the only way to learn them is to memorize them, but even this is not all that bad because IF you dedicate and pace yourself such that you learn let say 10 words a week, that's 520 words a year and 2600 words in 5 years. 10 words a week is nothing. Although this is not 100% fluency, 2600 kanji means you will be able to read about 97% of printed materials in Japanese.

    And there are many more instances of older people who were able to achieve fluency in a foreign language late in their life. One example from history is Lafcadio Hearn - a famous writer who was born in Greece, immigrated to the US, and then went to Japan when he was 40 years old (1890) where he stay and later became a Japanese citizen. You don't get to become a Japanese citizen unless you are fluent in Japanese.
    8 answers · 1 month ago
  • Is Godzilla still popular and a big cult following in Japan?

    Is Godzilla still popular and a big cult following in Japan?

    Best answer: Well Yes...

    New ‘Shin Godzilla’ statue at Tokyo’s Godzilla Square near the Hibiya Chanter shopping complex.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IoJj8dl1ZYo
    Best answer: Well Yes...

    New ‘Shin Godzilla’ statue at Tokyo’s Godzilla Square near the Hibiya Chanter shopping complex.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IoJj8dl1ZYo
    3 answers · 1 month ago
  • How much should I save up for Toyko Olympics?

    I currently want to start saving up for the Toyko Olympics. I saw some of the estimates for the trip, accommodations, food etc and it was up to 15k. Most of the estimates I saw were for weeks. I’m planning for 3-6 days tops. They also spent a lot on food and accommodations, while I’m planning on AirBnb... so how... show more
    I currently want to start saving up for the Toyko Olympics. I saw some of the estimates for the trip, accommodations, food etc and it was up to 15k. Most of the estimates I saw were for weeks. I’m planning for 3-6 days tops. They also spent a lot on food and accommodations, while I’m planning on AirBnb... so how much do you think I should save up for the Olympics as a student.
    5 answers · 1 month ago
  • Is "12 years of education conducted fully in English" an absolute requirement for getting an instructors' visa in Japan?

    I'm a Russian-born US citizen and speak English on a native level without accent. However I only received 6 years of education in middle and high school, as well as 4 years of college. I'm afraid I'll actually have to go for the Specialist in Humanities visa instead, which is less than ideal. I saw... show more
    I'm a Russian-born US citizen and speak English on a native level without accent. However I only received 6 years of education in middle and high school, as well as 4 years of college. I'm afraid I'll actually have to go for the Specialist in Humanities visa instead, which is less than ideal. I saw conflicting info on a few immigration websites as well as heard different things from different people, so I'm a little bit confused as to legitimacy of that requirement. Does it actually exist? If so, is it absolute or somewhat negotiable depending on one's English proficiency? If the former, are there any *ahem* loopholes to the law?
    8 answers · 2 months ago