• Can the majority ever be morally wrong?

    I would imagine modern atheists would ultimately have to conclude their own moral opinions incorrect by default if they went against the majority. What other authority would there be to determine all these things? I'm also wondering how we can condemn things in the past that had majority support, that future... show more
    I would imagine modern atheists would ultimately have to conclude their own moral opinions incorrect by default if they went against the majority. What other authority would there be to determine all these things? I'm also wondering how we can condemn things in the past that had majority support, that future people won't condemn us for in the same ways.
    37 answers · 3 days ago
  • What is our greatest resource in life?

    14 answers · 18 hours ago
  • Do you think life just doesnt make sense ?

    Is it just me or does life just not make sense. I see people trying to make sense of things that happen in life, but maybe things just happen in life. Good or bad, some people are extremely lucky, some just are not. THings just happen and many times there really is no reason it happened, it just happened. I guess... show more
    Is it just me or does life just not make sense. I see people trying to make sense of things that happen in life, but maybe things just happen in life. Good or bad, some people are extremely lucky, some just are not. THings just happen and many times there really is no reason it happened, it just happened. I guess thats just humans, trying to make sense of everything when maybe its not suppose to make sense. It just is what it is. Deep down, i really dont know if i believe this myself but it could be the truth. Im just kinda lost in life like so many others, just asking the question why am i here, but maybe im just here and there is no reason. I dont know
    16 answers · 3 days ago
  • Can a WRONG...become RIGHT?

    16 answers · 4 days ago
  • Is it OK to be lazy?

    I have been feeling like most things I m supposed to want to have in life are too much effort to obtain.
    I have been feeling like most things I m supposed to want to have in life are too much effort to obtain.
    8 answers · 1 day ago
  • Would ambition be considered human nature?

    if not, then why? and what would it then be considered?
    if not, then why? and what would it then be considered?
    9 answers · 4 days ago
  • Philosophy: Which famous philosopher do you find it difficult to respect?

    How quickly did you write them off & why?
    How quickly did you write them off & why?
    9 answers · 4 days ago
  • How do I resist the urge to spend money on entertainment?

    How do I resist the urge to spend money on entertainment?

    How was your weekend? Mine was good and I did not spend any money on entertainment and amusement. But sometimes I feel very bummed out about this. I feel this way because I used to be the exact opposite. I used to be the guy who would drink heavy drinks in the rooftop lounges, The W South Beach is my spot in... show more
    How was your weekend? Mine was good and I did not spend any money on entertainment and amusement. But sometimes I feel very bummed out about this. I feel this way because I used to be the exact opposite. I used to be the guy who would drink heavy drinks in the rooftop lounges, The W South Beach is my spot in Miami, where I got some friends and family. I would smoke weed and drink. I would go to restaurants and watch plays and shows, only to go to a lounge/restuarant afterwards. Night ending with around $150, sometimes more. I have stopped doing this for about a month and a half and even earlier this year I was keeping myself in check. But I really get these urges to do these things again. How can I retain my self discipline and keep being a modest and tranquil individual?
    6 answers · 4 days ago
  • Philosophy: How can I think more systematically or 3-dimensionally?

    Best answer: If your awareness is in the following interpretation (which is a recognized and honored orientation) of "systematically" or "3-dimensionally," would suggest these resources which will be listed after explication of said interpretation of your awareness, to wit: your awareness is not primarily... show more
    Best answer: If your awareness is in the following interpretation (which is a recognized and honored orientation) of "systematically" or "3-dimensionally," would suggest these resources which will be listed after explication of said interpretation of your awareness, to wit: your awareness is not primarily seeking what is given in e.g. "Ready to Be a Thought Leader? How to Increase Your Influence, Impact, and Success," by Denise Brosseau, but is more after what is less-sought after, namely metacognitive techniques. The time-honored method is to study in a tradition, learning its mentative techniques. For example, Charles Peirce, the great American phenomenologist (he termed his awareness "universal phenomenology") systematically studied the writings of Kant two hours a day, for three years.

    While this latter facility imho is correlative with what you're seeking, Peirce's method may seem daunting or even arduous. Howbeit, what Peirce attained is rare--a facility within, and with, Kantian archetectonics. This is a level of serious or genuine philosophy. You might note Kant's parallel between a philosophical doctrine and a given architecture, vis a vis the "3-dimensional" quale of moving within a building, noting and presumably knowing its vaults, ceiling, wiring, foundation, and so on--i.e., professional facility (no pun intended), which is somewhat reprised by and aspired to by some academics. Peirce was properly cautious about "one-idea" philosophies (e.g., all is sex (gross oversimplification of Freud), all is economics (Marx), etc.), and a musical analogy to "3-d" thinking is like what Beethoven, referring to string quartet composition, termed "obbligato accompaniment"--in which each of the four solo parts are both unique voices with unique themes, and the four work together as a company with transformations and exchanges. (Beethoven's so-called "late string quartets" are among the greatest achievements of Western classical music https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Late_strin... and one may learn much by "actively listening" (a la Emerson's "active reading") to them. The great 20th century personage, Sunyata, was working on an English estate when he and Rabindranath Tagore were introduced, as Tagore was en route to accepting the Nobel Prize for Literature; Sunyata introduced and explicated Beethoven's later string quartets to Tagore, who invited Sunyata to teach "Silence" at his University. Sunyata also tutored Indira Gandhi, who was significantly assisted by him. "Sunyata: The Life and Sayings of a Rare-Born Mystic" is one introduction to this gentleman who also imho "improved" some lines of Shakespeare.) Two additional examples of such "3-D" archetectonics and facility are Bach (who wisely always dedicated each page of music to the glory of God) and Monet (whose paintings, viewed in real space, show an incredible "obbligato" dimensionality, which imo are not discernable even in the best reproductions ( https://denverartmuseum.org/exhibitions/... is an opportunity for many).

    So, fine art, classical music, and Shakespeare are rewarding ways to increase "3-D" cognitive processing.

    As for recent philosophers, would note Husserl and Whitehead, also Merrell-Wolff's "Pathways through to Space" (he was an early 20th century Harvard and Stanford trained mathematician and philosopher, who left a professorship at Stanford to work on the "3-D" process).

    Would note as easy, popular meditations on archetectonics and geometrization of energy,
    Aivanhov's "The Symbolic Language of Geometrical Figures,"
    "The Path of the Higher Self" as a generally helpful guide,
    "Kundalini West" (written by a woman who, in the presence of a public audience, spontaneously levitated up and over a podium and a balustrade, landing gently some rows into the audience; the explanation: her body was so enhanced by and filled with Light, that her weight was displaced);
    and "Answers," by Mother Meera (if you attend a session with this God-woman, you will be gently blessed
    to the maximum lawful progress; she is visiting the U.S. this year; https://www.mothermeera.com ).

    Would also note Mihaly C's "Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience" and Almaas' "Runaway Realization."
    5 answers · 4 days ago
  • Pessimists make me want to stab my eye with a spork. How to love them despite their retardation that prevents them from any success at all?

    Best answer: AVOID PESSIMISM THE BIBLE SAYS: “If you become discouraged in the day of distress, your strength will be meager.”—Proverbs 24:10. WHAT IT MEANS: Pessimism will sap you of the strength you need to improve your situation or to help you deal with it. FOCUS ON THE POSITIVE THE BIBLE SAYS: “All the days of the afflicted... show more
    Best answer: AVOID PESSIMISM
    THE BIBLE SAYS: “If you become discouraged in the day of distress, your strength will be meager.”—Proverbs 24:10.
    WHAT IT MEANS: Pessimism will sap you of the strength you need to improve your situation or to help you deal with it.
    FOCUS ON THE POSITIVE
    THE BIBLE SAYS: “All the days of the afflicted one are bad, but the one with a cheerful heart has a continual feast.”—Proverbs 15:15.
    WHAT IT MEANS: If you see everything negatively, you will feel “afflicted” and every day will appear “bad,” or gloomy. But if you focus on positive things, you will have “a cheerful heart” and even feel joyful. The choice is yours.
    9 answers · 6 days ago
  • What is the meaning of life?

    14 answers · 1 week ago
  • How do we hear our own thoughts?

    35 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Philosophy: Would you say Jesus himself advocates what Nietzsche calls a "slave morality"?

    Best answer: Lets first understand what Nietzche means. Nietzche and Hegel use the term "slave morality" in the context of the "Master-Slave" dialectic. Masters are those with power. Slaves are the oppressed. Christ's "slave morality" from Nietzche's point of view is a morality from the... show more
    Best answer: Lets first understand what Nietzche means. Nietzche and Hegel use the term "slave morality" in the context of the "Master-Slave" dialectic. Masters are those with power. Slaves are the oppressed.

    Christ's "slave morality" from Nietzche's point of view is a morality from the perspective of the weak, vulnerable and oppressed. So yes, you could say Christ advocates a slave morality. He died on the cross, which in Roman times was an execution reserved for slaves and spoke about the poor inheriting the Kingdom of God.

    The God of the Old Testament also advocates a slave morality. In the Exodus he takes the side of the slaves against the Imperial power of the Pharaoh and in the Law speaks about how Israelite society should take care of the poor, widow, orphan and stranger since "you were once strangers in the land"(Deuteronomy 25).
    5 answers · 6 days ago
  • How's the Philosophy going ?

    Best answer: its going welll thank you
    Best answer: its going welll thank you
    10 answers · 2 weeks ago