• Why is water wet?

    Best answer: Now I am a huge chemistry fan so let me explain the science behind my answer: Water is a chemical, believe it or not and so is anything that is made out of matter. The word "chemical" is always seen as this monstrous thing that causes diseases like cancer (but those types of chemicals are known as... show more
    Best answer: Now I am a huge chemistry fan so let me explain the science behind my answer:

    Water is a chemical, believe it or not and so is anything that is made out of matter. The word "chemical" is always seen as this monstrous thing that causes diseases like cancer (but those types of chemicals are known as carcinogens). My point is that we are all made of chemicals.

    Water is formed by 2 hydrogen atoms and one oxygen (H2O). The chemical name of water is actually dihydrogen monoxide. Now these molecules of hydrogen and oxygen are connected because they share electrons (electrons are small particles that have orbit around the centres of atoms and are considered to be a part of the atom).

    Now since these atoms are now connected they are also charged.Tetrahedral refers to water s geometric shape of the location of atoms relative to the one in the middle. This refers to the intramolecular forces (between atoms that make up one water molecule).

    The bonding between different molecules of water is very strong because of the atoms involved in intramolecular forces. The bonding between molecules of water is known as intermolecular forces. These are very strong (one of the strongest ones ever known) and account for all the unique properties of water.

    When something is thought as wet, it because water molecules are on an object, and most like because of the bonding between the object s molecules, and the water molecules that they are bound. Now water is wet because the water molecule is touching other water molecules. Now if water molecules are touching other water molecules, you can not say that its wet because we know that a collection of one type of molecules is not a property.

    Therefore wet is a word that cant be used to describe the physical properties of dihydrogen monoxide.
    16 answers · 1 week ago
  • What are a list of metals that can be used to make weapons?

    Best answer: Almost every. Some are too soft by themselves but can be alloyed. Many too expensive to be practical.. Many , like sodium, can explode in water but hard to disperse and handle before use. Beryllium by itself too soft and light, but can be alloyed into springy Beryllium Copper, and make a good knife or... show more
    Best answer: Almost every. Some are too soft by themselves but can be alloyed. Many too expensive to be practical.. Many , like sodium, can explode in water but hard to disperse and handle before use.

    Beryllium by itself too soft and light, but can be alloyed into springy Beryllium Copper, and make a good knife or arrowhead.

    But Iron, Titanium, make good gun barrels and knives; , almost any soft metal--lead, tin, antimony, bismuth, uranium, etc--a bullet.

    Some non metals can be hazardous, too. Ever hear of carbon fiber and graphite? If golf clubs and auto bodies can be made of it, a good weapon can be made of these.

    Explosives and propellants are almost exclusively non metal. So almost any element can, in theory, be turned from plowshare to sword, to misquote the Good Book.

    Or Fluorine or Chlorine as poisonous gas, as in WWI. Uranium, into a dirty bomb.

    EDIT: I did not mean Fluorine was used in WWI--it will work though,.
    6 answers · 4 days ago
  • Biology, Chemistry, or Physics?

    Does it matter what order I take these classes in? My mom took Chemistry first but I'd think Biology would be first.
    Does it matter what order I take these classes in? My mom took Chemistry first but I'd think Biology would be first.
    5 answers · 4 days ago
  • What are some odorless, flavorless chemicals?

    Best answer: Helium. Carbon dioxide. Hydrogen. Methane.
    Best answer: Helium. Carbon dioxide. Hydrogen. Methane.
    4 answers · 3 days ago
  • Calculate the wavelength of light that has a frequency of 6.36 × 1014 s−1. Please?

    Best answer: Light is a wave. Particles in a wave bounce back and forth which makes the wave propagate in a certain direction at a certain speed. For lightwaves the speed of propagation in vacuum is c, about 300 million m/s. Frequency means how many times a particle does a bouncing motion. 6.36×10^14 s^-1 means the particle... show more
    Best answer: Light is a wave.
    Particles in a wave bounce back and forth which makes the wave propagate in a certain direction at a certain speed.
    For lightwaves the speed of propagation in vacuum is c, about 300 million m/s.

    Frequency means how many times a particle does a bouncing motion.
    6.36×10^14 s^-1 means the particle does 6.36×10^14 bounces each second.
    One complete bounce cycle constitutes one wavelength.

    So this particular wave travels 6.36×10^14 wavelengths in a second.

    Speed of wave = 300,000,000 m each second = 6.36×10^14 wavelengths each second.
    If 3.63×10^14 wavelengths equal 300,000,000 m, then how much is one wavelength?

    wavelength = speed / frequency = (3.00×10^8 m/s) / (3.36×10^14 s^-1) = 8.93×10^-7 m

    I really hope that makes sense for you.
    4 answers · 4 days ago
  • Chemistry Question?

    Best answer: 760 g x 131 PPM
    760 g x 131 µg/g
    100000 µg
    100 mg
    0.1 g
    Best answer: 760 g x 131 PPM
    760 g x 131 µg/g
    100000 µg
    100 mg
    0.1 g
    6 answers · 6 days ago
  • Best way to make hydrogen water?

    10 answers · 1 week ago
  • What makes water?

    4 answers · 6 days ago
  • Why is molar mass sometimes in g/mol, sometimes just in grams?

    Best answer: I have never experienced molar mass being expressed only as grams for the units. Example: The molar mass of sodium is 22.99g/mol. But I suppose that you could say: One mol of sodium has mass of 22.99 grams. When doing calculations such as in computing percent composition by mass,* you may use the molar mass of... show more
    Best answer: I have never experienced molar mass being expressed only as grams for the units. Example: The molar mass of sodium is 22.99g/mol. But I suppose that you could say: One mol of sodium has mass of 22.99 grams.
    When doing calculations such as in computing percent composition by mass,* you may use the molar mass of the compound and the molar mass of the individual atoms in the compound, but eventually you arrive at a position where you have calculated the mass - expressed in grams - of the component atoms in the molecule. You do not arrive at a position where the mass of the individual component atoms is expressed in g/mol.
    *Clarified later: You have stated: "percent composition by mass" and the unit of mass is the gram.
    Example : Calculate the % composition of the atoms in H2SO4
    Molar mass H2SO4 = 98g/mol
    Molar mass H = 1g/mol : Mass H2 in 2mol = 2g
    Molar mass S = 32g/mol : Mass S in 1 mol = 32g
    Molar mass O = 16g/mol: Mass O4 in 1 mol = 64g
    % composition
    H = 2g/98g*100 = 2.04%
    S = 32g/988*100 = 32.65%
    O = 64g/98g * 100 = 65.31%
    Note that you use the actual mass of the element in the compound - in this case of O , 64g , which cannot be written as 64g/mol because this is not the molar mass of O.
    4 answers · 6 days ago
  • What use would a guy who's both stupid AND a rapist have on this planet?

    Best answer: Electrocuting wartfrogs and demoning summons
    Best answer: Electrocuting wartfrogs and demoning summons
    26 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Why do isotopes of the same element have identical chemical properties while having different mass numbers?

    Best answer: Cause isotopes have the same number of electrons - and their valence shell is the same! And not only isotopes. The transition metals are so simmilar that all of them are in the same "squares" in the Periodic Table - lantanides and actinides. One of the most difficult task in a lab is separate them from... show more
    Best answer: Cause isotopes have the same number of electrons - and their valence shell is the same!
    And not only isotopes. The transition metals are so simmilar that all of them are in the same "squares" in the Periodic Table - lantanides and actinides. One of the most difficult task in a lab is separate them from one another.
    5 answers · 1 week ago