• Which is your favourite language?

    100 answers · 3 days ago
  • What does nosce mentum mean in Latin?

    Best answer: Know (your) mind
    Best answer: Know (your) mind
    4 answers · 10 hours ago
  • What language should I learn?

    I would like to become fluent in a language but I am not sure which one. My native language is English, I tried learning German but the pronounciation was hard and the words were very hard. I also did not adjust well to the different grammar rules. What language has similar rules, and is easy to pronounce /... show more
    I would like to become fluent in a language but I am not sure which one. My native language is English, I tried learning German but the pronounciation was hard and the words were very hard. I also did not adjust well to the different grammar rules. What language has similar rules, and is easy to pronounce / spell? I was thinking French or Italian as it is very similar to English but I am not sure. Thank you!
    14 answers · 2 days ago
  • What is "do you know the way?" in french, german and spanish?

    Best answer: In French, the answer to your question depends on what exactly you mean by "way", what you mean by "you" and also in what context you're saying it. Also, it depends if you are talking formally, neutrally or informally. There are 3 ways to ask questions in French. The inversion questions are... show more
    Best answer: In French, the answer to your question depends on what exactly you mean by "way", what you mean by "you" and also in what context you're saying it. Also, it depends if you are talking formally, neutrally or informally.

    There are 3 ways to ask questions in French. The inversion questions are formal, the "est-ce que questions" are neutral and the intonation questions (bascially an affirmative sentence with a question mark in the end) is informal.

    There are 2 "you" in French. The second person singular "tu" is for when you're talking to one friend, member of your family, person you feel close to, peer (particularly in school), child, animal or god. The second person plural is when you're talking to more than one person, whoever it is, or when you're talking to one person you don't know, someone above you (your boss, the mayor, the president, etc) or someone you want to show some extra respect or distance to.
    Additionally, "you" is often used in English as an impersonal subject when French would actually use "on".

    "Way" in English can mean direction or manner. They are translated into several different things in French depending on the information you want to convey.
    For example for a direction, it could be "direction" for a general orientation, "chemin" for a relatively short path or "route" for a longer path.
    For a manner, it could be translated "façon", "méthode", "mannière" or something else.

    So that makes at least 3*3*6 = 54 possible translations for what you asked. And that's not considering that sometimes, sentences are completely reformulated and do not include any of the words of the original sentence it's translated from.

    I know this is annoying and I'm not doing that to bother your. But I wanted you to understand that whenever you ask for a translation into an other language, particularly from a language as sloppy as English in term of grammar, you need to provide a maximum of context if you want to be sure you get what you are looking for.
    6 answers · 2 days ago
  • How to say Netherlands in Urdu?

    4 answers · 1 day ago
  • Is zaro a word in any language?

    8 answers · 3 days ago
  • Is saying "yeah, yeah" considered off hand and impolite?

    Best answer: Spoken English has tonal (voice) included that makes it different from texting and writing. In written words, it often indicates a bored and cut-off of the speaker (other person). It is also very lazy to use it often, even in spoken words. In a simpler way to answer, I can say it is a bad habit to have. Your tonal... show more
    Best answer: Spoken English has tonal (voice) included that makes it different from texting and writing. In written words, it often indicates a bored and cut-off of the speaker (other person). It is also very lazy to use it often, even in spoken words. In a simpler way to answer, I can say it is a bad habit to have. Your tonal inflections can be misinterpreted to mean you are bored with what they are saying and they should move on. I take is as similar to OK, OK. Once is neutral, but twice can be a negative, as "I've had enough of this - move on, an unimportant point.
    In agreement, there are many short responses to vary yourself. Among them:
    That's great, Agreed, Perfect, That's right, So true, We're in sync, Totally agree. Of course. Yes. You got it. Sounds good.
    A habit of "yeah, yeah" makes you seem like an idiot, in my opinion of anyone that can't vary their speech.
    "Yeah" is already a casual yes that many people avoid even if it sometimes slips through.
    Off-hand and impolite are not the right description. Lazy and easy to misinterpret are closer to it.
    13 answers · 2 days ago
  • Anglophones, answer me two doubts about grammar in English, please and thank you very much:?

    Best answer: Rebecca's answer is my favorite, but a few others also give the same information. Let me say more about it. 1. Peter's ball. The boy's ball. The possessive case. (we do not usually use THE with proper nouns, like Peter) a. Normally used to indicate ownership. The owner is usually a person or an... show more
    Best answer: Rebecca's answer is my favorite, but a few others also give the same information.

    Let me say more about it.

    1. Peter's ball. The boy's ball. The possessive case. (we do not usually use THE with proper nouns, like Peter)

    a. Normally used to indicate ownership. The owner is usually a person or an animal, etc.

    b. Sometimes it is abstract ownership. Tomorrow's meeting. (tomorrow, cannot really own something, but we speak as though it does).

    c. If one of those criteria doesn't apply, then an "of" construction is used. The theory of evolution (not: the evolution's theory). Evolution does not own the theory, even in abstract sense (in the mind of an English speaker anyway).

    2. the ball of Peter -- using a prepositional phrase beginning with OF as an adjective to describe the ball. This is not done for possession. Peter's ball -- is the only option.

    -- There are times when both ways can be used with certain nouns, but they are rare and should be learned as exceptions.

    3. Peter ball -- not allowed. Some nouns can be used as adjectives without changing form, but not all nouns.

    The golf ball -- golf, is a noun, used as an adjective describe what kind of ball. the golf's ball - not possible - not about ownership. the ball of the golf - not possible (just sounds wrong).

    4. Here is a rare example where all three structures are possible:

    a. The restaurant's menu -- the restaurant owns the menu.

    b. The menu of the restaurant - turns restaurant into an adjective phrase using OF. Not very likely, but possible, especially for emphasis.

    c. The restaurant menu -- restaurant, a noun used directly as an adjective. It merely describes what kind of menu it is. Native speakers are likely to use A or C, depending on the dialect or the speaker's personal choice.

    5. the neutral article. Even though it exists in Spanish and Portuguese, that construction is rather rare among the world's languages. It is hard for me to understand why it's used.

    French uses two words, but they translate as: that which. I don't know that which that thing is (there)

    English uses one word: what. I don't know what that thing is (there). there - is not necessary; That - makes "there" very clear.

    what, ce que, etc - are relative pronouns, without an antecedent. They also function as conjunctions introducing a dependent clause. Different languages do those differently, if they even have relative pronouns (some languages don't). They don't have to exist, so it's not surprising that they can be done in different ways.

    6. I don't know enough about Spanish or Portuguese to know if there would be any confusion if the neutral article were left out. If there would be, then that might explain why it's there. que - may have other uses in those languages that English what or French que don't have to worry about. (If I'm correct about that, please leave me a comment. I would love to know).

    7. Always ask why. There are often logical reasons. But sometimes the answer is: just because. (There is usually more than one way to do something, and different languages make different choices).

    8. Note: using the equivalent of "what" as that type of relative pronoun is fairly common among Germanic languages. English is a Germanic language.

    9. Note also: Latin didn't have articles. So those Spanish & Portuguese constructions using the neutral article are relatively new ideas, since they were not part of classical Latin.

    10. It's best to think like an English speaker. Word it in your head the way an English speaker would (just as I do for French. I know "ce que" translates as "what", but I also know it is literally: that which). note: que - does not mean "what" in this French phrase (sometimes it does though).
    9 answers · 12 hours ago
  • Native English speakers only please?

    Hello guys, I just want you to check if this sentence is correct. I told Scott a secret and made sure he never tells anyone. The next week, I heard it from three different people. I was so pissed. Thanks in advance.
    Hello guys, I just want you to check if this sentence is correct. I told Scott a secret and made sure he never tells anyone. The next week, I heard it from three different people. I was so pissed. Thanks in advance.
    9 answers · 22 hours ago
  • What was the very first language?

    18 answers · 3 days ago
  • Does a North Carolina/South Carolina accent sound foreign?

    Best answer: He is ignorant. Just because somebody says something, especially something that reveals his ignorance, is no reason for you to give it a moment's thought. If somebody says something that stupid to you again, I suggest you respond, "Hmmm. That's interesting. I was just thinking YOU had a funny accent." show more
    Best answer: He is ignorant. Just because somebody says something, especially something that reveals his ignorance, is no reason for you to give it a moment's thought.
    If somebody says something that stupid to you again, I suggest you respond, "Hmmm. That's interesting. I was just thinking YOU had a funny accent."
    6 answers · 7 hours ago
  • Is Mandarin the easiest Asian language to learn since it is the one with most resources?

    Someone told me Thai is easier than Mandarin but there are also no resources in Thai. For this reason learning Thai is actually more difficult than learning Mandarin
    Someone told me Thai is easier than Mandarin but there are also no resources in Thai. For this reason learning Thai is actually more difficult than learning Mandarin
    8 answers · 2 days ago
  • Why are some British people so difficult to understand when they talk?

    Some of them sound like they're not speaking English.
    Some of them sound like they're not speaking English.
    6 answers · 11 hours ago
  • Does this sound natural in English?

    Best answer: The sentence structure is fine, but, the logic is a little wonky. How would a test advance a career? Studying, or a course would, and, tests are part of that, but, too many details are left out of this sentence.
    Best answer: The sentence structure is fine, but, the logic is a little wonky. How would a test advance a career? Studying, or a course would, and, tests are part of that, but, too many details are left out of this sentence.
    8 answers · 2 days ago
  • Is there a beautiful Japanese woman?

    8 answers · 2 days ago
  • Is really <have got> same meaning as <have> in American English?

    1.Is really <have got> same meaning as <have> in American English? But I know "You've got a mail" ; this is present perfect tense. 2.Do Amercan use <got> as present perfect tense sometimes?;for example, "I got a boyfriend" I want to know how frequent it is.
    1.Is really <have got> same meaning as <have> in American English? But I know "You've got a mail" ; this is present perfect tense. 2.Do Amercan use <got> as present perfect tense sometimes?;for example, "I got a boyfriend" I want to know how frequent it is.
    6 answers · 20 hours ago