• Do we fully understand gravity?

    I mean, we know It's there, we know how it works etc. after einstein everyone just moved along saying it's because mass warps spacetime, but we don't even know why?
    I mean, we know It's there, we know how it works etc. after einstein everyone just moved along saying it's because mass warps spacetime, but we don't even know why?
    9 answers · 10 hours ago
  • A person vs 100 tons of TNT?

    Best answer: What person? Oh, you mean those bits of blood and gore spread over a square mile or so?
    Best answer: What person? Oh, you mean those bits of blood and gore spread over a square mile or so?
    8 answers · 9 hours ago
  • Can antimatter be harnessed as fuel?

    6 answers · 1 hour ago
  • How fast does someone need to run before disintegrating?

    Best answer: A speed of 1500 mph would cause some burns on the clothing and skin. Actually disintegrating ... probably something near 500,000 mph. That's all the way around the world in just 3 minutes. At that speed, the mass of the air you hit in 1 millisecond is the same as your body mass. I use 1 millisecond as a... show more
    Best answer: A speed of 1500 mph would cause some burns on the clothing and skin. Actually disintegrating ... probably something near 500,000 mph. That's all the way around the world in just 3 minutes.

    At that speed, the mass of the air you hit in 1 millisecond is the same as your body mass. I use 1 millisecond as a quick approximation to the time it takes sound to pass through the thickness of a human body. But since this speed is Mach 650, the shock wave would travel faster, and disintegrate the body faster. So maybe a mere 50,000 mph would do the job.

    Meteors often explode at just 50,000 mph, but they are made of solid rock.
    7 answers · 20 hours ago
  • Will hyperloop ever become a new mode of transportation?

    If it does will it replace air travel
    If it does will it replace air travel
    6 answers · 6 hours ago
  • Does the elevator do this to everyone or am I just fat?!?

    When I step into the elevator it makes a thud sound and lowers a bit. Does this happen to everyone when they walk into an elevator?
    When I step into the elevator it makes a thud sound and lowers a bit. Does this happen to everyone when they walk into an elevator?
    7 answers · 1 day ago
  • What is Zero Gravity?

    Best answer: Weightlessness, or an absence of 'weight', is an absence of stress and strain resulting from externally applied mechanical contact-forces, typically normal forces from floors, seats, beds, scales, and the like. Counter intuitively, a uniform gravitational field does not by itself cause stress or strain, and... show more
    Best answer: Weightlessness, or an absence of 'weight', is an absence of stress and strain resulting from externally applied mechanical contact-forces, typically normal forces from floors, seats, beds, scales, and the like. Counter intuitively, a uniform gravitational field does not by itself cause stress or strain, and a body in free fall in such an environment experiences no g-force acceleration and feels weightless. This is also termed "zero-g" where the term is more correctly understood as meaning "zero g-force.
    10 answers · 2 days ago
  • If I drop a bouncy ball from burj khalifa will it orbit earth?

    burj khalifa is 830 miles high, and a bouncy ball dropped from a few feet bounces pretty high, so what happens if its dropped from 830 miles? It goes up bouncing so high so can it orbit earth?
    burj khalifa is 830 miles high, and a bouncy ball dropped from a few feet bounces pretty high, so what happens if its dropped from 830 miles? It goes up bouncing so high so can it orbit earth?
    7 answers · 1 day ago
  • Does anyone think the Butterfly Effect is real?

    I have read the Chaos theory which ostensibly grounds this proposition; however, we have never observed a causal nexus, nor is the causal chain of events verifiable. Frankly if one is to believe in the Butterfly Effect they must succumb to the ontological argument and admit to an unmoved mover who has the power of... show more
    I have read the Chaos theory which ostensibly grounds this proposition; however, we have never observed a causal nexus, nor is the causal chain of events verifiable. Frankly if one is to believe in the Butterfly Effect they must succumb to the ontological argument and admit to an unmoved mover who has the power of self existence, and self movement.
    7 answers · 2 days ago
  • How can quarks have "flavors"?

    8 answers · 3 days ago
  • The nornal force for a 3 kg textbook sitting on a table is?

    a) 0 N b) .33 N c) 3 N d) 9.81 N e) 29.4 N f) 294.3 N
    a) 0 N b) .33 N c) 3 N d) 9.81 N e) 29.4 N f) 294.3 N
    5 answers · 20 hours ago
  • Fvckin' magnets. How do they work?

    Best answer: Electrons are little magnets. In most substances, they're paired off. In some substances they're not. And in substances where they aren't, and you have a lot of electrons aligned the same way, their magnetic fields combine enough that the field can be measured on a macro-scale.
    Best answer: Electrons are little magnets. In most substances, they're paired off. In some substances they're not. And in substances where they aren't, and you have a lot of electrons aligned the same way, their magnetic fields combine enough that the field can be measured on a macro-scale.
    11 answers · 4 days ago
  • Gravity is determined by?

    Gravity is determined by?

    Best answer: In classical physics the force of gravity is W = mGM/r^2 where m is the target mass that has the force called weight, G is a tiny constant, M is the source mass of the gravity field (e.g., Earth), and r is the distance between m and M. So what you weigh, the force of gravity, is determined by your mass m, the... show more
    Best answer: In classical physics the force of gravity is W = mGM/r^2 where m is the target mass that has the force called weight, G is a tiny constant, M is the source mass of the gravity field (e.g., Earth), and r is the distance between m and M. So what you weigh, the force of gravity, is determined by your mass m, the Earth's mass M, and how far you are from Earth's center of mass. ANS.

    But a more precise model for the force of gravity is the general theory of relativity. It specifies that gravity sources are mass, energy, and/or stress. Not just mass. And it also specifies that the characteristics we attribute to the force of gravity are due to warped space. [Check the image.]

    As you can see in the image, space curves inward onto the mass of Earth. These curve lower the potential energy in closer to the planet. So potential energy wells are created. And objects falling into those wells pick up kinetic energy as their potential energy decreases. So the objects are both accelerating and falling toward the planet. Both are gravity characteristics: attraction and acceleration.
    6 answers · 3 days ago