• Is there a specific proper term for a mistress's "boyfriend"?

    So a woman who is romantically involved with a taken man is called a mistress, then what would the term for the man be? To make it more clear I will give an example. Archie is going steady with Veronica, but has a secret romance with Betty. Therefore: Archie is Veronica's boyfriend. Veronica is Archie's... show more
    So a woman who is romantically involved with a taken man is called a mistress, then what would the term for the man be? To make it more clear I will give an example. Archie is going steady with Veronica, but has a secret romance with Betty. Therefore: Archie is Veronica's boyfriend. Veronica is Archie's girlfriend. Betty is Archie's mistress. Archie is Betty's what? Is there a specific word for this?
    32 answers · 3 days ago
  • Fat = Curvy? Yes or No? Why?

    Best answer: Curvy = not straight. A figure with hips, noticeable breasts, defined waist. Not necessarily overweight (although might be).

    Fat = carrying more weight, in adipose tissue/fat, than is recommended for good health.
    Best answer: Curvy = not straight. A figure with hips, noticeable breasts, defined waist. Not necessarily overweight (although might be).

    Fat = carrying more weight, in adipose tissue/fat, than is recommended for good health.
    36 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • What is a word that has va in it?

    Best answer: Vivacious
    Best answer: Vivacious
    43 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Is this a valid English sentence: "He killed him before he killed him."?

    Best answer: Yes. It's somewhat nonsense, but it's grammatical. For example, I might imagine one could say something like that if he gave him some deadly disease, effectively killing him, before shooting him in the head. It's fairly common that when someone does something that will result in another person's... show more
    Best answer: Yes. It's somewhat nonsense, but it's grammatical. For example, I might imagine one could say something like that if he gave him some deadly disease, effectively killing him, before shooting him in the head. It's fairly common that when someone does something that will result in another person's death to say that that person "killed" the other person even if that person hasn't actually died yet but is as good as dead.

    To make it somewhat more clear, you could say, "He had killed him before he killed him." However, using the pluperfect isn't absolutely required since you actually say the events in chronological order. Still, the pluperfect tense more firmly establishes one event in the past as happening prior to another event in the past.
    24 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • What are good words to tell others to make them smile?

    Best answer: Everything passes..have faith..Hope will always,meet you there..


    Be genuine..the intelligent mind ..knows the difference..when you

    are so,your own heart and words,flow naturally..as individual as the

    very person,your speaking too.~*
    Best answer: Everything passes..have faith..Hope will always,meet you there..


    Be genuine..the intelligent mind ..knows the difference..when you

    are so,your own heart and words,flow naturally..as individual as the

    very person,your speaking too.~*
    16 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • What do you call a group of people from the Ottoman Empire?

    Best answer: there is no "man" meaning intended by the existence of "man" n the word, so pretending there is would be incorrect. Thus, no reason to convert the "man" in Ottoman into OttoMEN. It is not like Englishman/Englishmen or Frenchman/Frenchmen. It is just a coincidence that the word ends... show more
    Best answer: there is no "man" meaning intended by the existence of "man" n the word, so pretending there is would be incorrect. Thus, no reason to convert the "man" in Ottoman into OttoMEN. It is not like Englishman/Englishmen or Frenchman/Frenchmen. It is just a coincidence that the word ends in those three letters, sort of like Herman. Not Hermen if there are two Hermans.
    13 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • What rhymes with the word "Child"??

    Best answer: filed
    wild
    mild
    dialed
    piled
    riled
    styled
    tiled
    smiled
    beguiled
    compiled
    exiled
    reconciled
    Best answer: filed
    wild
    mild
    dialed
    piled
    riled
    styled
    tiled
    smiled
    beguiled
    compiled
    exiled
    reconciled
    19 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • What is the difference in liking people vs loving people? What is the difference in disliking people vs, hating people?

    Best answer: Liking people means that you like to be with them. Loving people means that you are motivated by love, to help them, when you can.
    Best answer: Liking people means that you like to be with them. Loving people means that you are motivated by love, to help them, when you can.
    8 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Please help ... What is it actually meant by 'as of' here in this context? Thanks?

    Best answer: It means when or at that time.
    Best answer: It means when or at that time.
    9 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • What does "she looked it too" mean in the sentence below?

    Best answer: It means she looked exhausted - not only was she telling Caulfield this, but he could also see it for himself.

    It is idiomatic usage, but then that's all part of Salinger's style.
    Best answer: It means she looked exhausted - not only was she telling Caulfield this, but he could also see it for himself.

    It is idiomatic usage, but then that's all part of Salinger's style.
    8 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • I am creating a menu, the title of the menu is ICE CREAM SUNDAES or will it have the apostrophe? thank you.?

    Best answer: It's a simple, plural noun: no apostrophe.
    Best answer: It's a simple, plural noun: no apostrophe.
    10 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Which is correct? "I will driving to New York today" or "I am driving to New York today."?

    Best answer: "I am driving to N Y today." "I will be driving to N Y today." "I shall be driving to N Y today." "I am going to drive to N Y today." "I am going to be driving to N Y today." All of those could be used in British English. But not: "I will... show more
    Best answer: "I am driving to N Y today."

    "I will be driving to N Y today."

    "I shall be driving to N Y today."

    "I am going to drive to N Y today."

    "I am going to be driving to N Y today."

    All of those could be used in British English.

    But not: "I will driving.....". That is totally wrong.
    10 answers · 2 weeks ago