• Is the sentence below grammatically correct?

    With cold weather, I have become very lazy.
    With cold weather, I have become very lazy.
    9 answers · 3 hours ago
  • Which sentence is grammatically correct?

    Benny Goodman was a badass on the clarinet Or Benny Goodman is a badass on the clarinet
    Benny Goodman was a badass on the clarinet Or Benny Goodman is a badass on the clarinet
    11 answers · 1 day ago
  • What is the difference hello,hey,hi ?

    11 answers · 1 day ago
  • Can a judge sentence someone to torture?

    8 answers · 12 hours ago
  • What is the best way to learn latin?

    Best answer: The "official" bible translation was written in ancient Greek. I have the official certificate of speaking Latin from my German school, the "Great Latinum", but that was 30 years ago, and as I didn't become a priest or worked in any other profession where Latin is really needed, I forgot a... show more
    Best answer: The "official" bible translation was written in ancient Greek.

    I have the official certificate of speaking Latin from my German school, the "Great Latinum", but that was 30 years ago, and as I didn't become a priest or worked in any other profession where Latin is really needed, I forgot a lot of my translation skills, and most of Latin grammar.

    I remember a student song in Latin:
    "Gaudeamus igitur iuvenes dum sumus"
    (Let us have fun while we're still young men)

    I wouldn't say learning Latin by song these days is easy; better take classes.

    You don't need to go as far as to delve deeply into the fine grammar, but understanding some ancient Roman words makes it easier to understand some scientific terms and even your own language.

    "Gallia est omnis divisa in partes tres, quarum unam incolunt Belgae, aliam Aquitani, tertiam, qui ipsorum lingua Celtae, nostra Galli appellantur."
    my translation:
    "France mainly has three parts, one of them is Belgium, the other one is Northern France, and the south is inhabited by the Celts, which we call the Gauls."
    (Gaius Julius Caesar, Roman warfarer and emperor, born around 100 BCE, stabbed by a knife and died allegedly on March 15th 44 BCE)
    12 answers · 2 days ago
  • Is “whom” only used in questions?

    13 answers · 3 days ago
  • Which is grammatically correct?

    Is it "the conversation between me and my ex"? or "the conversation between my ex and I? if neither, what's correct?
    Is it "the conversation between me and my ex"? or "the conversation between my ex and I? if neither, what's correct?
    10 answers · 2 days ago
  • English conversion?

    Best answer: That is a statement made by a clerk or a secretary who handles Justin Trudeau's mail. It means, "We want you to know we received your letter."
    Best answer: That is a statement made by a clerk or a secretary who handles Justin Trudeau's mail. It means, "We want you to know we received your letter."
    21 answers · 5 days ago
  • What is the preposition here used for?

    Hey guys, I came across the following sentence and didn't know what is the preposition "of" right after the last comma in the sentence used for, to me, it makes more sense actually without the of. Can you tell me why the of is put that way? Thanks a lot. "You will observe that, for this reason,... show more
    Hey guys, I came across the following sentence and didn't know what is the preposition "of" right after the last comma in the sentence used for, to me, it makes more sense actually without the of. Can you tell me why the of is put that way? Thanks a lot. "You will observe that, for this reason, the mystery has been considered easy, when, for this reason, it should have been considered difficult, of solution."
    6 answers · 2 hours ago
  • Can you give me your answers?

    Many English words have more than one meaning. For instance, the word “convention” basically has four meanings, but if a native speaker simply hears a single word “convention,” which meaning does he first think of?
    Many English words have more than one meaning. For instance, the word “convention” basically has four meanings, but if a native speaker simply hears a single word “convention,” which meaning does he first think of?
    6 answers · 3 hours ago
  • How to say it correctly "My English is modest."?

    Best answer: I think you mean something more like decent, moderate, or fair (as in not great but not awful). Modest tends to be used more for people and their attitude about themselves (not arrogant, not a braggart). It can be used to mean a small amount as well, though, so you aren't totally wrong in saying that your... show more
    Best answer: I think you mean something more like decent, moderate, or fair (as in not great but not awful). Modest tends to be used more for people and their attitude about themselves (not arrogant, not a braggart). It can be used to mean a small amount as well, though, so you aren't totally wrong in saying that your English is modest. It is just that we think of language ability in terms of bad, fair, good rather than small, modest/medium, large. Ability (what you mean by "your English", your ability to communicate in English) is not a number-based thing. It is a quality-based thing. Thus words meaning good, bad, and in-between tend to be used.
    7 answers · 1 day ago
  • What's the English diff, if any, btw saying, "Do you KNOW anyone who sells this stuff? " and, "Do you KNOW OF anyone who sells this stuff"?

    Best answer: There are two completely different meanings between the sentences.
    The first is asking if you actually know someone who sells this stuff.
    The second is asking if you have heard of someone who sells this stuff.
    Best answer: There are two completely different meanings between the sentences.
    The first is asking if you actually know someone who sells this stuff.
    The second is asking if you have heard of someone who sells this stuff.
    15 answers · 5 days ago
  • Which word is appropriate (may or must) in this policy. "Only department issued uniforms may / must be worn."?

    Best answer: Only department-issued uniforms MAY be worn. or Department-issued uniforms MUST be worn. See how the second sentence doesn't use 'only'. This alters the verb. I'll rephrase: You MAY wear ONLY department-issued uniforms OR You MUST wear department-issued uniforms. All these sentences mean the same.... show more
    Best answer: Only department-issued uniforms MAY be worn.
    or
    Department-issued uniforms MUST be worn.
    See how the second sentence doesn't use 'only'. This alters the verb.

    I'll rephrase:
    You MAY wear ONLY department-issued uniforms
    OR
    You MUST wear department-issued uniforms.

    All these sentences mean the same. Nobody is allowed to wear anything except department-issued uniforms.
    12 answers · 3 days ago
  • Could you please tell me what does “liberated” mean in this sentence?

    “My parents had something that was as important to them as I was liberated me”
    “My parents had something that was as important to them as I was liberated me”
    8 answers · 2 days ago
  • Is "You said what?" grammatically correct?

    For example, if someone says something to you and you didn't hear them, is it appropriate to ask "You said what?". I say this sometimes when I am talking to friends, but I feel like it is not correct.
    For example, if someone says something to you and you didn't hear them, is it appropriate to ask "You said what?". I say this sometimes when I am talking to friends, but I feel like it is not correct.
    10 answers · 3 days ago