• Does our sun have a name?

    Best answer: The official name, in English, of our star is Sun (with a capital S). The word "sun" (small s) is a simile: a word used to describe things that are similar. Other stars that have planets are often called suns (small s), but in astronomy, we try to avoid the simile unless it is quite clear. Our Sun's... show more
    Best answer: The official name, in English, of our star is Sun (with a capital S). The word "sun" (small s) is a simile: a word used to describe things that are similar. Other stars that have planets are often called suns (small s), but in astronomy, we try to avoid the simile unless it is quite clear.
    Our Sun's name, in Latin, is Sol. That is why we have the adjective solar, in English.
    The Solar system (the system of planets around "Sol") is OUR planetary system. Other planetary planets (around other stars) are not solar systems (they are planetary systems or systems of planets).
    The name of our Sun in Greek is Helios. That is why we talk of the heliographic system (the system describing the Sun as the centre).

    The official name, in English, for our natural satellite is Moon (capital M). The word moon (small m) can be used as a simile for other objects that are similar. For example, the moons of Jupiter. However, in astronomy, the official word for these things is "satellite".
    Moon's name in Latin is Luna; we have the adjective lunar, in English.

    Our Galaxy's official name in English is (was) Galaxy - with a capital G. Other galaxies are given names that depend on the direction in which we see them from Earth (the Andromeda galaxy appears to be in the constellation called Andromeda), or on the shape of the galaxy (the Sombrero galaxy looks like... a sombrero), or the number it has in some official list (for example NGC-224, for the 224th galaxy listed in the New General Catalogue).
    The Milky Way is a band of stars that makes up a part of our Galaxy. Calling our Galaxy the Milky Way galaxy (with or without a big G) is not wrong, but it is redundant (the word galaxy comes from a Greek word meaning "milky").

    The problems started when an American astronomy magazine asked authors to use lower-case letters for the proper names of the Sun and the Moon, giving people the false impression that these things had no names.
    17 answers · 3 days ago
  • Are ufo;s for real?

    19 answers · 2 days ago
  • How about we shove Jupiter into Neptune?

    So we have more room to get to Mars.
    So we have more room to get to Mars.
    15 answers · 1 day ago
  • Why isn't Pluto considered a planet?

    9 answers · 11 hours ago
  • Is it possible that our galaxy is at the center of the Universe?

    Best answer: The Hubble Telescope has proved it isn't.
    Best answer: The Hubble Telescope has proved it isn't.
    25 answers · 4 days ago
  • Did satellites help us discover any uncharted land and make all of Earth charted?

    Best answer: Yes, there are barrier islands discovered by satellites. Earth has been thoroughly mapped by satellite, including the ocean floor by SeaSat satellites. the problem is the resolution of the SeaSat images is not very good. "...657 new islands discovered by satellite imagery. Of... show more
    Best answer: Yes, there are barrier islands discovered by satellites. Earth has been thoroughly mapped by satellite, including the ocean floor by SeaSat satellites. the problem is the resolution of the SeaSat images is not very good.

    "...657 new islands discovered by satellite imagery. Of course, they are immediately declared threatened by sea level rise
    Anthony Watts / April 21, 2011

    Chandeleur Islands - Image: Univ of Montana

    From LiveScience.com

    Here’s something you don’t see every day — hundreds of new islands have been discovered around the world.

    The Earth has 657 more barrier islands than previously thought, according to a new global survey by researchers from Duke University and Meredith College in Raleigh, N.C.

    The researchers identified a total of 2,149 barrier islands worldwide using satellite images, topographical maps and navigational charts. The new total is significantly higher than the 1,492 islands identified in a 2001 survey conducted without the aid of publicly available satellite imagery...."

    https://www.livescience.com/62784-co2-suck-climate-gasoline-air.html?utm_source=notification

    Notice that article is 7 YEARS OLD.

    The truthful answer to your questions is YES.
    6 answers · 3 days ago
  • Do moon phase clock exists?

    if so where do you get one?
    if so where do you get one?
    12 answers · 4 days ago
  • Is there a super Galaxy at the center of the containment of the Universe?

    Best answer: Perhaps you can explain what the "containment of the universe" means.
    Best answer: Perhaps you can explain what the "containment of the universe" means.
    12 answers · 4 days ago
  • Is there such thing as aliens?

    I think out there somewhere there must be other life besides us
    I think out there somewhere there must be other life besides us
    27 answers · 6 days ago
  • Space Survival Kit?

    List 10 item to survive in the space. Explain
    List 10 item to survive in the space. Explain
    8 answers · 5 days ago
  • What gases are there in a sun?

    20 answers · 6 days ago
  • Where is Carl Sagan?

    5 answers · 10 hours ago
  • Why haven t we traveled any further than the moon by now? It s now 2018 don t we have the technology for this yet?

    Best answer: It's not about technology. Just getting anybody to, say, Mars, is not the problem. After all, unmanned probes have been to have a look at all the planets and several comets. The problem is the difficulty of sending actual people. People need food, air, the ability to cope with being cooped up in a small... show more
    Best answer: It's not about technology. Just getting anybody to, say, Mars, is not the problem. After all, unmanned probes have been to have a look at all the planets and several comets. The problem is the difficulty of sending actual people.

    People need food, air, the ability to cope with being cooped up in a small spacecraft for months or years, and gravity to prevent their bones and muscles wasting away. So they need total recycling including growing their own food, the mental stability for it, and lots of exercise to keep them fit - which is why ISS astronauts are required to exercise on treadmills and other equipment for 2 hours a day, and even so, they still tend to feel a bit weak when they first get back down to Earth.

    This is all being researched on the ISS and they haven't yet got as far as being able to do all this. The ISS is still reliant on food and clothes being sent up from the ground. How do you wash clothes in space when the water just floats? So they don't even try that, they just wear clothes for a week and throw them out, so they always need more new clothes sent up.

    Furthermore, how will they survive the journey without dying of cancer caused by radiation? Stay close to the Earth and you're protected by the Earth's magnetic field, or for just a few days further away it'll be OK as it was for the Apollo missions. But otherwise, it's a blizzard of cosmic radiation out there, mostly of charged particles emitted by the Sun, and it would be like living in continual nuclear fallout. Unless you can develop a spaceship that includes the necessary shielding and isn't immensely heavy, there is no way anyone is going anywhere.
    15 answers · 6 days ago