• If the Earth is a sphere, then hasn’t anyone seen the curve?

    I have seen countless of videos of rockets going up into space showing no curvature at all except for those using cameras with fisheye lenses. And sadly, I can’t believe I’m seeing the curvature when I watch any live footage from the ISS because I caught them using fisheye lenses. They say you can see a bit of the... show more
    I have seen countless of videos of rockets going up into space showing no curvature at all except for those using cameras with fisheye lenses. And sadly, I can’t believe I’m seeing the curvature when I watch any live footage from the ISS because I caught them using fisheye lenses. They say you can see a bit of the Earth’s curvature from a plane, but that’s because the plane’s round windows are having an effect on your view. Not even the first man to reach the Earth’s stratosphere could see the curvature. “IT SEEMED A FLAT DISC WITH UPTURNED EDGE” - Auguste Piccard
    23 answers · 14 hours ago
  • Do you believe in life on other planets?

    There are thousands of planets throughout the universe and we are the ONLY one with life? I doubt that, what are your thoughts?
    There are thousands of planets throughout the universe and we are the ONLY one with life? I doubt that, what are your thoughts?
    22 answers · 14 hours ago
  • I'm 71 yrs old, what is the chance of me still being alive when the first human steps on Mars?

    Best answer: I turn 79 in about three weeks, and worked for three years on Apollo (then taught astronomy 34 years), so I would love to see the first footsteps on Mars, but the likely schedule is: next manned landing on the Moon 2024, possible manned circle of Mars 2035, landing 2040, when I would be 101. I had a great great... show more
    Best answer: I turn 79 in about three weeks, and worked for three years on Apollo (then taught astronomy 34 years), so I would love to see the first footsteps on Mars, but the likely schedule is: next manned landing on the Moon 2024, possible manned circle of Mars 2035, landing 2040, when I would be 101. I had a great great grandmother who lived past 106, so vaguely possible, but I wouldn't put money on it.
    23 answers · 2 days ago
  • Our government has the technology to control the weather.. why can't we land on the moon?

    Best answer: I’m pretty sure you have your two facts reversed...
    Best answer: I’m pretty sure you have your two facts reversed...
    17 answers · 1 day ago
  • Will life exist forever?

    I read that someday there will be nothing left in our univse, bt what about parrallel universes, will they all get to the point to there is no life sustainable in them? Will new universes always be created so life can go on forever?
    I read that someday there will be nothing left in our univse, bt what about parrallel universes, will they all get to the point to there is no life sustainable in them? Will new universes always be created so life can go on forever?
    15 answers · 1 day ago
  • Where is the nearest planet with oxygen?

    And how much would it cost to slap together or hop on the nearest rocket going there?
    And how much would it cost to slap together or hop on the nearest rocket going there?
    9 answers · 8 hours ago
  • How many square miles is the entire Universe?

    Best answer: Don't you mean CUBIC miles? Or cubic light years or cubic parsecs or cubic megaparsecs? A lot bigger number than you, or anyone, can comprehend, but NOT infinity. I will let YOU do the math yourself.
    Best answer: Don't you mean CUBIC miles? Or cubic light years or cubic parsecs or cubic megaparsecs? A lot bigger number than you, or anyone, can comprehend, but NOT infinity. I will let YOU do the math yourself.
    13 answers · 2 days ago
  • In theory, would antimatter rockets be safe to get stuff into orbit?

    Best answer: Anti matter become photonic energy when it contacts matter. Typically gamma rays. So we could in theory get a whole lot of energy from the merging of matter with anti-matter. The issue though is that we cannot create or otherwise find tonnes of antimatter to do that with. In fact we've only been able to... show more
    Best answer: Anti matter become photonic energy when it contacts matter. Typically gamma rays. So we could in theory get a whole lot of energy from the merging of matter with anti-matter.

    The issue though is that we cannot create or otherwise find tonnes of antimatter to do that with. In fact we've only been able to create anti-matter at the sub-atomic particle level (e.g., anti-neutrino or positron). And when those merge with a matter sub-atomic particle, the amount of energy released is very very...very very tiny. Did I mention tiny?

    And there is one more obstacle: what do you keep the universal solvent in? If anti-matter essentially dissolves all matter it touches, what do we keep the anti-matter in so that it doesn't dissolve the container? We have the same issue with attempts at creating a sustainable nuclear fusion reaction, which is also a universal solvent. And thus far there have been no successful solutions to that problem.

    So the answer is...no we could not do it. We can't get enough of the stuff to do it and we couldn't contain enough of the stuff even if we could get anti-matter in large quantities.
    10 answers · 1 day ago
  • If nothing can escape a black hole, how does their gravity get out to suck in more matter?

    Best answer: Mathematically, gravity resides at the event horizon (not inside) and its "information" is available to the rest of the universe. Gravity (unlike other forces) is an effect. Under the mathematical models that work under Relativity (the same ones that explain both gravity AND black holes), gravity is not... show more
    Best answer: Mathematically, gravity resides at the event horizon (not inside) and its "information" is available to the rest of the universe.

    Gravity (unlike other forces) is an effect. Under the mathematical models that work under Relativity (the same ones that explain both gravity AND black holes), gravity is not a force, but a deformation of spacetime. As soon as you have a mass (regardless where the "information" about this mass resides), spacetime -- or the "fabric of space" as Einstein put it -- will respond by altering its shape.

    Having said that, the idea that black holes "suck" matter is wrong. The gravity caused by the amss of a black hole works exactly the same as the gravity caused by a mass of equal quantity that is not a black hole. If you were to magically replace our Sun with a black hole of equal mass, the planets would continue on their orbits same as before (except, of course, things would get very cold, very fast).

    You only get "sucked" into the black hole if you get too close (in the case of the black hole with one solar mass, that means 3 km from what appears to be the centre). Given that Earth is 150 MILLION km from the Sun, the gravitational field around Earth would remain the same, whether we keep our real Sun, or replace it with a one solar-mass black hole.
    14 answers · 4 days ago
  • Why are we still using low tech rockets to fly to space?

    Best answer: Because they are hiding all the Space Alien technology out in Area 51. The big corporations want to make money on regular technology and hog all the good Space Alien stuff for the elites. Everyone knows that.
    Best answer: Because they are hiding all the Space Alien technology out in Area 51. The big corporations want to make money on regular technology and hog all the good Space Alien stuff for the elites. Everyone knows that.
    15 answers · 3 days ago
  • How many years will it be until we know for a fact how the universe was created?

    Will we know within the next 100 years how the universe came into existence? It doesn’t make sense to me how something can come from nothing.
    Will we know within the next 100 years how the universe came into existence? It doesn’t make sense to me how something can come from nothing.
    14 answers · 3 days ago
  • Lets test your knowledge are you smart? Seasons are caused by the tilt of the earth on its axis (around 23.5 degrees) How does this?

    Best answer: A. When the Southern hemisphere is tilted toward the sun, the South gets more direct rays than the North, so it is winter in the North and summer in the South. And vice versa when the South is tilted away from the sun During spring and fall, neither hemisphere is tilted more toward the Sun. Direct rays hit only at... show more
    Best answer: A. When the Southern hemisphere is tilted toward the sun, the South gets more direct rays than the North, so it is winter in the North and summer in the South. And vice versa when the South is tilted away from the sun During spring and fall, neither hemisphere is tilted more toward the Sun. Direct rays hit only at the tropical zones near the equator.

    B. On the summer solstice, the Earth's north pole is tipped toward the Sun. In the northern hemisphere, this means the Sun gets high in the sky at noon. But in the winter, when the Earth is on the other side of its orbit, the Earth's north pole is tipped away from the Sun, so at noon the Sun doesn't get as high

    C. Summer is warmer than winter (in each hemisphere) because the Sun's rays hit the Earth at a more direct angle during summer than during winter and also because the days are much longer than the nights during the summer. These effects are due to the tilt of the Earth's axis.

    This wasn't intelligence, but just an ability to Google and copy and paste.
    8 answers · 17 hours ago
  • Apollo 11 and Saturn V?

    I am running a research on the first rocket on the moon, checking online, I have found that it was Apollo 11, looking further I see that "Apollo 11 was launched by Saturn V" which I presume means that Apollo 11 is not the rocket name, so what is it? Looking at Saturn V, it says that it was launched 13... show more
    I am running a research on the first rocket on the moon, checking online, I have found that it was Apollo 11, looking further I see that "Apollo 11 was launched by Saturn V" which I presume means that Apollo 11 is not the rocket name, so what is it? Looking at Saturn V, it says that it was launched 13 times, so you would think that it's a reusable rocket, but reusable rockets weren't a thing back then which only confuses me more. So what is Saturn V? Please clear this up for me so I can understand better, much appreciated :)
    21 answers · 4 days ago