• Can you give me some information about Jupiter?

    I can't find information anywhere, and my report is due tomorrow!
    I can't find information anywhere, and my report is due tomorrow!
    69 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • How would you prepare for the following emergency? The gravitational bond between earth and sun disappears and a black hole takes its place?

    Best answer: If that truly did happen, events on Earth would be so overwhelming that no form of preparation would make any difference.
    Best answer: If that truly did happen, events on Earth would be so overwhelming that no form of preparation would make any difference.
    30 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Is there really a neutron star heading towards earth in the year 2080 or 2087 please answer?

    Best answer: NO. There are no neutron stars within 20 lightyears of the Solar System. And why, with eight planets, 179 moons and who knows how many dwarf planets and asteroids, Earth would be singled out. Strictly nutcase nonsense
    Best answer: NO. There are no neutron stars within 20 lightyears of the Solar System. And why, with eight planets, 179 moons and who knows how many dwarf planets and asteroids, Earth would be singled out. Strictly nutcase nonsense
    24 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Did NASA said that a neutron star is heading to earth in 2080 or 2087?

    Best answer: I'm sorry but where you got this ridiculous information baffles me. The nearest Neutron Star to Earth is located in the Ursa Minor Constellation and is nicknamed Calvera after the villain in the Magnificent Seven. It is between 250 and 1000 light years from the Earth. To even reach Earth it would take... show more
    Best answer: I'm sorry but where you got this ridiculous information baffles me.

    The nearest Neutron Star to Earth is located in the Ursa Minor Constellation and is nicknamed Calvera after the villain in the Magnificent Seven.

    It is between 250 and 1000 light years from the Earth.

    To even reach Earth it would take millions of years not 62 to 69 years.
    21 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • If the universe is infinite, is multiverse theory true?

    Best answer: It's not the multiverse theory; it's nothing more than the multiverse hypothesis. The idea of a multiverse is only speculation of what "could be" based on the appearance of multiple higher dimensions beyond the basic 3 + time in the mathematical equations of quantum physics and string theory... show more
    Best answer: It's not the multiverse theory; it's nothing more than the multiverse hypothesis. The idea of a multiverse is only speculation of what "could be" based on the appearance of multiple higher dimensions beyond the basic 3 + time in the mathematical equations of quantum physics and string theory (also really just string hypothesis). The reason it's hypothesis and not theory is because there is no evidence for a multiverse, no ability for us to explore and probe into other locations within higher dimensions, and no ability for us to see or travel beyond the boundaries of what we can observe from here (the farthest observable light being the cosmic microwave background radiation). It would require observation, experimentation, and confirmed prediction of the data, as well as rigorous peer review to ensure the data was sound and there were no flaws in the studies, for the hypothesis to graduate up to the level of theory. Until then, thoughts about a multiverse are just an interesting speculation. [Note: I specified string hypothesis because the notion of vibrating strings of energy are only implied by mathematical equations. They are predicted to exist down at the scale of the Planck length, 10^-35 meters, many orders of magnitude smaller than the tiniest things we can only indirectly observe such as a top quark with a diameter of about 10^-22 meters or neutrinos at 10^-24 meters. There is currently no known way to observe anything of a smaller size, which would be required to observe and confirm strings and thus graduate the hypothesis up to the level of theory.]

    And if the universe where we exist actually is infinite, and traveling an infinite amount of time in any direction will just continuously reveal more and more galaxies and therefore more and more planets, yes, an infinite universe with infinite galaxies would have infinite planets (and moons) where any number of things could happen on them. If that is the case then hypothetically, yes, there could be another planet where life formed and evolved in exactly the same direction as what happened here on Earth, including the extinction events which wiped out past species such as the asteroid impact that took out the dinosaurs, resulting in a lineage of primates that evolved into hominids and eventually humans. All the events and everything on all those infinite planets would still have to fall within the limits of the laws of physics, chemistry, etc. But the idea of a duplicate Earth being out there somewhere is also just entertaining speculation since it would take an infinite amount of time to explore an infinite amount of planets, and the universe will have a finite life with an expected ability to support life for only another 30 billion years or so, followed by an eventual heat death.

    Interestingly, as I was reading about orders of magnitude and measurement of distance, I came across this: the distance of 10^10^122 meters (a 1 followed by 10^122 zeros, much bigger than a googolplex) is "According to the laws of probability, the distance one must travel until one encounters a volume of space identical to our observable universe with conditions identical to our own." [Wikipedia]
    13 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • For the linear accretion producing artificial gravity, would the space craft orbit the sun? would it do this in a spiral shape?

    the spiral shape due to angular velocity...
    the spiral shape due to angular velocity...
    10 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Is it true that the astronomical telescopes on the ground can only observe visible light and radio waves from outer space?

    Best answer: In general terms, yes. Only a limited range of electromagnetic radiation can get through Earth's atmosphere clearly. Infrared and ultraviolet get through less well, and X-rays and gamma rays even less well than them (just as well as they are dangerous to life) There ARE infrared telescopes on the ground but... show more
    Best answer: In general terms, yes. Only a limited range of electromagnetic radiation can get through Earth's atmosphere clearly. Infrared and ultraviolet get through less well, and X-rays and gamma rays even less well than them (just as well as they are dangerous to life) There ARE infrared telescopes on the ground but it's like looking through fog, so it's even more vital than with optical telescopes to put them high up on mountains to be above as much of the atmosphere as possible.

    So for the best view, yes, you need to put your telescope on a satellite.
    9 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Compare the size of Eris to Pluto?

    Eris: 2326 km Pluto: 2377km find relative difference
    Eris: 2326 km Pluto: 2377km find relative difference
    11 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Carl Sagan or Snooki?

    17 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • What should I do with my physics degree? (astronomy emphasis)?

    I am currently gaining a bachelors in physics with an astronomy emphasis, but I really don t know what to do after I graduate. I ve always wanted to work for NASA and be an astrophysicist, but I feel like that sounds vague. What specific jobs are there? I know I can t do any of the big stuff with just a bachelors,... show more
    I am currently gaining a bachelors in physics with an astronomy emphasis, but I really don t know what to do after I graduate. I ve always wanted to work for NASA and be an astrophysicist, but I feel like that sounds vague. What specific jobs are there? I know I can t do any of the big stuff with just a bachelors, but where can I start?
    14 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Is universe or are universes?

    Best answer: In efforts to explain by natural processes alone the design and fine-tuning evident in the cosmos, still others turn to what has been called the multiverse, or many-universe, theory. According to this hypothesis, perhaps we live in just one of countless universes—all of which have different conditions, but none of... show more
    Best answer: In efforts to explain by natural processes alone the design and fine-tuning evident in the cosmos, still others turn to what has been called the multiverse, or many-universe, theory. According to this hypothesis, perhaps we live in just one of countless universes—all of which have different conditions, but none of which have any purpose or design. Now according to that line of reasoning and the laws of probability, if you have enough universes, eventually one of them should have the right conditions to support life. However, there actually is no scientific evidence to support the multiverse theory. It is pure speculation.
    18 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • How is it that we have these powerful telescopes on Earth and outer space but we can not locate nor photograph the massive “Planet 9” ?

    Best answer: The amount of light we get from an object diminishes with the squre of the distance. Twice as far = 4 times dimmer; three times as far = 9 times dimmer. The amount of light reflected by a planet depends on its distance from the Sun. Twice as far = it gets 1/4 of the light intensity; three times as far = it... show more
    Best answer: The amount of light we get from an object diminishes with the squre of the distance. Twice as far = 4 times dimmer; three times as far = 9 times dimmer.
    The amount of light reflected by a planet depends on its distance from the Sun. Twice as far = it gets 1/4 of the light intensity; three times as far = it gets.

    Compared to "Planet 9", Pluto is very close to us (and closer to the Sun than Planet 9). In addition, Pluto is not really a planet (in that sense) but closer to a comet nucleus -- albeit a giant one. It reflects a lot more sunlight than a "normal" planet surface would. That is why it was thought, for a long time, to be a lot bigger than it really is.

    If Planet 9 is a real planet (darker in color than Pluto) AND if it is in orbit at an average distance of 700 AU (astronomical units -- 1 AU = Earth's orbital distance) then it is 17.5 times further away from the Sun as Pluto.
    (17.5)^2 = 306.25

    It is illuminated by sunlight that is 300 times dimmer than what Pluto gets.
    The light we would get from it will be 300 times dimmer than what we would get if Planet 9 was near Pluto.

    And its relative motion (its orbital speed) would be a lot slower than Pluto's orbital speed (which is a pedestrian 4.67 km/s). Planet 9's orbital speed would be barely above 1 km/s (compare to Earth's orbital speed of 30 km/s).
    At that distance, it would barely move by 2' per day (it would take two weeks for this planet to move by the equivalent of the apparent diameter of our Moon).

    Summary: this Planet 9 is expected to be A LOT fainter than Pluto, and it would move extremely slowly over short periods. Plus, we don't know in which direction it would appear, as seen from Earth (it is not even expected to be near the ecliptic like "normal" planets are).
    13 answers · 2 weeks ago