• Is another habitable planet a need of the hour?

    Best answer: More like the need of the last 2 CENTURIES. Thomas malthus underestimated the rate expnential rate of technological change and innovation.. Malthusian economics is VERY VERY OUTDATED. Considering the current state of politics in world we are right back almost where we were in ... show more
    Best answer: More like the need of the last 2 CENTURIES. Thomas malthus underestimated the rate expnential rate of technological change and innovation..

    Malthusian economics is VERY VERY OUTDATED.

    Considering the current state of politics in world we are right back almost where we were in 1962 with Cuban Missile crisis, except now there is no sane who can advise the President in 3 minutes or less.Back then i i had no desire to die. Now i don't care..

    "...Malthusian Theory of Population. Thomas Robert Malthus was the first economist to propose a systematic theory of population. He articulated his views regarding population in his famous book, Essay on the Principle of Population (1798), for which he collected empirical data to support his thesis...."

    http://cgge.aag.org/PopulationandNatural...
    13 answers · 15 hours ago
  • Is this moon viewing subscription company a scam?

    If I sign up he guarantees that I will see the moon in the sky, at least once a month. Maybe more. $19.99/ per month
    If I sign up he guarantees that I will see the moon in the sky, at least once a month. Maybe more. $19.99/ per month
    16 answers · 1 day ago
  • Why can’t we colonize the moon or mars if China wants to?

    China will build a base on the moon and mars to mine resources but we can’t because we don’t want to?
    China will build a base on the moon and mars to mine resources but we can’t because we don’t want to?
    19 answers · 2 days ago
  • Question about life on other planets?

    As someone who has almost no knowledge of science, including that of the universe and planets etc..., I am really interested about potential of life on other planets. I have two questions that I would appreciate if people with more knowledge on this matter could answer: 1. Is it all but confirmed that all 8 other... show more
    As someone who has almost no knowledge of science, including that of the universe and planets etc..., I am really interested about potential of life on other planets. I have two questions that I would appreciate if people with more knowledge on this matter could answer: 1. Is it all but confirmed that all 8 other planets in our solar system have no life, or just some? If some may, which of the 8? 2. What are the odds that there is at least some other planet in the entire universe with life on it? Are there humans or other life like us who wonder whether we exist?
    16 answers · 2 days ago
  • What would happen if you jumped into a hole in the earth?

    Best answer: Assuming you were in a vacuum, the Earth was perfectly spherical, of uniform density and the hole went straight through the centre of the Earth: you'd accelerate until you reached the centre of the Earth, then decelerate all the way through to the other side, reaching a velocity of zero the instant you reach... show more
    Best answer: Assuming you were in a vacuum, the Earth was perfectly spherical, of uniform density and the hole went straight through the centre of the Earth: you'd accelerate until you reached the centre of the Earth, then decelerate all the way through to the other side, reaching a velocity of zero the instant you reach the surface. Then you'd fall back through the Earth and potentially oscillate between the opposite sides of the planet forever.
    13 answers · 1 day ago
  • Why don’t they make artificial human robots to explore planets?

    Best answer: If efficiency is the aim then the task is to discover which shape and form a robot should be in order to explore a planet as effectively as possible. True, a wheeled robot is far from ideal, but it is stable, simple, and the principles of a wheel are well understood. But that does not imply that the human form is... show more
    Best answer: If efficiency is the aim then the task is to discover which shape and form a robot should be in order to explore a planet as effectively as possible.

    True, a wheeled robot is far from ideal, but it is stable, simple, and the principles of a wheel are well understood. But that does not imply that the human form is somehow ideal. And indeed it would not be expected to be ideal, as the human form evolved to swing about in trees then land on it's feet in grassland, not to fossick about at minus 100 degrees in a vacuum.

    We could expect the ideal robot for planetary exploration to be something like the military "BigDog", which has four legs for agility but a low and fairly stable profile. But since planetary exploration is in it's infancy, we really don't know at this stage what the ideal shape is for a robot to explore other worlds.

    But one thing is for sure: humans are spectacularly unsuited for any operations off-Earth. We are far too fragile, too clumsy, and have far too many sensitive environmental requirements to be of any use in space except at colossal cost, most of which goes into life support systems, which no robot needs.

    The only value of android (human-like) robots in space would be as a publicity thing, so people who can't think outside of the human experience could see them hulking around on another planet and be satisfied that humanity has some sort of representative in space.

    Cheers!

    Cheers!
    13 answers · 1 day ago
  • What would happen if time stopped? Assuming the universe still existed.?

    Title says it all
    Title says it all
    13 answers · 2 days ago
  • If a planet is roughly equal distance between 2 stars, is it possible for it to orbit both of them in a figure-of-8 orbit?

    Best answer: It may do so a few times, but the orbit wouldn't be stable; only under perfect circumstances would it last a while. There are cases where a planet will orbit the center of gravity between two stars (Proxima Centauri orbits Alpha and Beta Centauri like this, in fact), but... no 'interesting patterns' -... show more
    Best answer: It may do so a few times, but the orbit wouldn't be stable; only under perfect circumstances would it last a while. There are cases where a planet will orbit the center of gravity between two stars (Proxima Centauri orbits Alpha and Beta Centauri like this, in fact), but... no 'interesting patterns' - that simply wouldn't be stable.

    Earth (and her sister planets) are far enough away from each other that there's very little force affecting them; while there *is* some, the effect is minuscule when you factor in the sheer momentum of each world. For a planet to 'fall' into the sun, you'd need to rob enough of it's orbital energy so that it's trajectory intersects the surface of the sun.... that's a LOT of energy to steal.
    Same for 'drifting into space' - now, you'd need to *add* energy to the planet such that it can climb up (and out) of the sun's gravity well - again, that's a LOT of energy to add.

    There are some cases of planets being "sling shot" out of orbit - but, generally, that requires the gravitational pull of a similar-sized or larger world acting on it. (There's some thought that we had another Neptune sized world in our solar system - but Jupiter threw it out: http://discovermagazine.com/2012/may/09-the-solar-systems-lost-planet)
    9 answers · 13 hours ago
  • Is the lake of fire hotter than the center of the sun?

    Best answer: lake of fire???
    Best answer: lake of fire???
    7 answers · 7 hours ago