• Who crate heaven and earth?

    39 answers · Astronomy & Space · 2 days ago
  • Why can't the position of planets at birth tell me about my personality or future?

    Astronomers- tell me why I can't rely on this. I simply won't believe it, until you set me straight.
    Astronomers- tell me why I can't rely on this. I simply won't believe it, until you set me straight.
    30 answers · Astronomy & Space · 1 day ago
  • Did you know Atheists at first saw the Big Bang Theory as a threat? Why did Atheists oppose the Big Bang Theory?

    The leading philosophers of ancient Greece showed no inkling of the concept of creation ex nihilo (equivalent of Big Bang) in time. For Leucippus (c. 490-430 B.C.) and Democritus (c. 460-360 B.C.), indivisible atoms were eternal in the void and creation of the world simply entailed them becoming packed or... show more
    The leading philosophers of ancient Greece showed no inkling of the concept of creation ex nihilo (equivalent of Big Bang) in time. For Leucippus (c. 490-430 B.C.) and Democritus (c. 460-360 B.C.), indivisible atoms were eternal in the void and creation of the world simply entailed them becoming packed or scattered, thus producing the world of things about us. Flash forward to the seventeenth century and we see a resurgence of philosophical atomism by theists Descartes, Gassendi, Boyle, and others. For centuries, atheistic materialists had assumed the eternity of the material world, a view seemingly harmonious with the “new atomism.” All of this also fit well with twentieth century astronomy’s standard “steady state” theory. The advent of the “Big Bang” theory of cosmic origins in the 30th century by a Belgian priest and astronomer Georges Lemaitre (1894-1966) changed all that. It thus met opposition for proposing a scientific hypothesis that the cosmos actually did have a temporal beginning like Christian theology had taught all along. Among the first to complain was Albert Einstein himself. Science had seemed to be in the atheist’s corner, until this upstart Big Bang theory was proposed – a theory that sounded too much like what atheists viewed as the “Christian mythology” of creation in time. Atheists from all corners of science went on to attack the Big Bang and still many do today. https://strangenotions.com/how-cosmic-ex...
    22 answers · Astronomy & Space · 15 hours ago
  • Is it true that if aliens existed it would take them light years to get to Earth?

    How long would it take them to travel to Earth? Do you believe that aliens exist?
    How long would it take them to travel to Earth? Do you believe that aliens exist?
    38 answers · Astronomy & Space · 2 days ago
  • Why can’t you divide by 0?

    23 answers · Mathematics · 2 days ago
  • No UFOs, Right?

    If there are no UFOs, then we must admit that thousands of people around the globe that have seen a UFO are lying. So many are lying? Really? Can it be that the government is hiding UFO facts from the public to prevent panic?
    If there are no UFOs, then we must admit that thousands of people around the globe that have seen a UFO are lying. So many are lying? Really? Can it be that the government is hiding UFO facts from the public to prevent panic?
    27 answers · Astronomy & Space · 2 days ago
  • Are humans de-evolving?

    We are not very smart as a species. Seriously, we doing lots of very stupid stuff. We tried killing off the entire population during world war I & II. We irradiated the planet on numerous occasions bombing the bikini islands, hiroshima, etc.
    We are not very smart as a species. Seriously, we doing lots of very stupid stuff. We tried killing off the entire population during world war I & II. We irradiated the planet on numerous occasions bombing the bikini islands, hiroshima, etc.
    13 answers · Biology · 2 days ago
  • If there are black holes, shouldn’t there also be dim holes?

    Best answer: Any gravitating object has a slight effect on the direction of light rays that pass near it without striking it. That doesn't make it a "dim hole" -- the light still passes by, but ends up on a slightly different trajectory than it would've had otherwise.
    Best answer: Any gravitating object has a slight effect on the direction of light rays that pass near it without striking it. That doesn't make it a "dim hole" -- the light still passes by, but ends up on a slightly different trajectory than it would've had otherwise.
    15 answers · Astronomy & Space · 15 hours ago
  • How much light is in a light year?

    19 answers · Physics · 2 days ago
  • Weed legalization: Yay or nay?

    I don’t support weed legalization for a number of reasons. But the main one being that I see all drugs sort of like human criminals. I don’t view weed as a murderer like heroine, meth, or crack. But rather I view weed as a thief. Weed isn’t something that will physically harm or hurt you. But rather it steals your... show more
    I don’t support weed legalization for a number of reasons. But the main one being that I see all drugs sort of like human criminals. I don’t view weed as a murderer like heroine, meth, or crack. But rather I view weed as a thief. Weed isn’t something that will physically harm or hurt you. But rather it steals your life away by making you unproductive, lazy, and killing your motivation. This isn’t just my opinion either, studies show marijuana actually lowers natural levels of dopamine and other feel good chemicals that drive to motivate you. And I don’t see a society of lazy and unproductive potheads, who rely on a small group of higher class people to get by, being better than a society of a few hard-drug addicts who end up dying young and saving public doll money. We all know damn well most potheads end up on welfare, in low-skilled jobs, and being misinformed voters. So I vote “no” to pot legalization.
    40 answers · Medicine · 4 days ago
  • How many kilometers in a meter?

    18 answers · Mathematics · 1 day ago
  • WHY DOES THE MOON GET HIT BY METEORS ETC?

    Best answer: The Earth gets just as many. Correct, it's in the way of just as much as the Moon is. However, there are three reasons why the Earth doesn't have so many obvious craters. (And more, such as plate tectonics, but I'll keep it to three.) 1. The Earth has an atmosphere. Most stuff heats up on the way... show more
    Best answer: The Earth gets just as many. Correct, it's in the way of just as much as the Moon is. However, there are three reasons why the Earth doesn't have so many obvious craters. (And more, such as plate tectonics, but I'll keep it to three.)

    1. The Earth has an atmosphere. Most stuff heats up on the way down as it's travelling fast, and it burns up, so only the really big ones hit the ground.

    2. Erosion takes place on Earth. Wind and water wear craters away eventually, so it's only the most recent ones - like Barringer Crater (also known as Meteor Crater) in Arizona - that are still visible. The Moon has no water and no weather, so this "scrubbing out" doesn't happen and craters get preserved forever.

    3. More than half of the Earth's surface is ocean. There is more chance of a big meteor landing in the ocean than on land. That would certainly cause a tsunami and flood all the coasts around where it landed, but it wouldn't make a crater.

    For example, do you remember the Chelyabinsk meteor in 2013? It came down as lots of people were driving to work and many of them had dashcams (so in case of an accident they have a video to prove what happened for insurance purposes). It flashed across the sky, became blindingly bright as it heated up on its way through the atmosphere, and exploded into smaller bits - that was all caught on cam. What a fantastic opportunity for scientists!

    Now where did the bits land? With all this cam footage from different directions, it was possible to work out where it came down and it turned out most of it landed in a lake miles from the city. So there's really almost nothing left of it to see. Scientists were able to dig up small pieces out of the snow and analyse what kind of meteorite it was, but the biggest bits landed in the lake.

    If that had headed towards the Moon, it would simply have crashed straight into the ground all in one piece and made an obvious crater.
    15 answers · Astronomy & Space · 3 days ago
  • How do you factor this completely?

    5q^2 − 15q − 90
    5q^2 − 15q − 90
    12 answers · Mathematics · 17 hours ago
  • When has the most recent human evolved from an animal? How long does it take one to evolve the way the animals do with Macro Evolution?

    Best answer: When? Never. Why not. Evolution as promoted does not compute. Evolution simple means change over time. At the same time there is absolutely no evidence any species has changed into a different species, ever. And there is a question very few have ever asked and to my knowledge no evolutionist has ever... show more
    Best answer: When? Never. Why not. Evolution as promoted does not compute. Evolution simple means change over time. At the same time there is absolutely no evidence any species has changed into a different species, ever.

    And there is a question very few have ever asked and to my knowledge no evolutionist has ever considered seriously. And that is this. How many hominid species have become extinct before the creation of humans?

    Instead most try to promote the idea that extinct hominids are actually unevolved humans.

    Why not? Simply because the concept of special creation is anathema to them.
    17 answers · Biology · 2 days ago
  • How do cows have milk?

    16 answers · Agriculture · 2 days ago
  • Which is greater 6/8 or 6/10?

    22 answers · Mathematics · 3 days ago