• Does a college degree guarantee a job ? yes / no ?
  • I just want to tell the people who dont answer my questions that I dont like you?

    Im also not going to answer your questions.
    Im also not going to answer your questions.
    12 answers · Other - Education · 13 hours ago
  • Should I go to community college?

    Best answer: That depends on what you want to major in. If you want to major in something like STEM/medical then it's best to go straight to a University.If you choose a major like those, it's likely that you'll begin taking classes related to them your freshman year. Plus, you can always take gen-ed classes online... show more
    Best answer: That depends on what you want to major in. If you want to major in something like STEM/medical then it's best to go straight to a University.If you choose a major like those, it's likely that you'll begin taking classes related to them your freshman year. Plus, you can always take gen-ed classes online or over the summer at a community college to lighten your workload.
    AP classes will matter depending on which University you want to attend. For example, I live in North Carolina. One of the top engineering schools here is NC State. Since their courses are so rigorous, they pretty much require students to have a high GPA and take plenty of AP classes in HS. I never took AP classes in HS so I decided to go to a school with easier admissions.
    I'd really suggest talking to your counselors and telling them exactly what you said here. I'm a freshman in college and I never went to my counselors in HS to see what I should be taking before I got to college. Because of that, I'm about a semester behind.
    9 answers · Higher Education (University +) · 2 days ago
  • What does SUBJECTIVE MEAN???

    I hear this word all the time from my friends and random people generally like everyday, when I look up the definition, I don't seem to get what it's trying to say. What does this word REALLY MEAN, and make it simple and give examples ThankYou!!!!!!!
    I hear this word all the time from my friends and random people generally like everyday, when I look up the definition, I don't seem to get what it's trying to say. What does this word REALLY MEAN, and make it simple and give examples ThankYou!!!!!!!
    13 answers · Words & Wordplay · 23 hours ago
  • What are your thoughts on this quote?

    Best answer: Do not have to tell you..it's a pretty special gift..

    as a cat does not, love..just anyone.~*
    Best answer: Do not have to tell you..it's a pretty special gift..

    as a cat does not, love..just anyone.~*
    28 answers · Quotations · 5 days ago
  • Encourage 24yr. old to stay in college or not??

    Best answer: You and your husband can decide what rules he has to follow in exchange for your help with his tuition. You and your husband can decide under what circumstances he may continue to live in your home. Basically, any help you offer, you can attach strings to. You can say, "Either you are in school, earning a... show more
    Best answer: You and your husband can decide what rules he has to follow in exchange for your help with his tuition.

    You and your husband can decide under what circumstances he may continue to live in your home.

    Basically, any help you offer, you can attach strings to. You can say, "Either you are in school, earning a semester GPA of 2.7 or better every term, or you can pay us $525 a month in rent and utilities, or you need to move out within 6 weeks of leaving school." You can say, "You need a B- or better in at least 4 classes a semester or you need to find your own place to live." You can say, "If you major in business we will pay 1/4 of your tuition and give you a place to live; if you switch to criminal justice we aren't contributing to tuition and you'll need to pay $100 a month in rent." You can say, "You aren't going to class, so we aren't going to support you as just a college student, but if you are working hard enough to satisfy us at getting a good job you may stay here for up to 6 months as long as you do the dishes and drive your younger siblings to and from school." You can say, "We will give you $236 a semester toward tuition, but you have to wear a Green Bay Packers shirt on game days."

    Whatever your rules are about the support you offer, you can enforce that rule (as long as you do it legally).

    He can turn you down. He can say, "Okay, if that's what I have to do to live here and get money from you, I'm going to be an itinerant mime, couch-surfing at my friends' houses and working as a street performer." He can say, "Okay, I guess I'll finish this degree with the best grades I can manage," but he can also say, "If you don't understand how much I hate business, or if you don't care, then I'm going to go spend my time with people who get me. Maybe I'll drop you a Mother's Day card some time."

    Clearly, what you want him to be doing is not working for him. Maybe he's lazy. Maybe he's suicidally depressed. Maybe he has found what he wants to do with his life and it's not what you want for him. Maybe he has no idea what he wants but is feeling pressured to commit to something and is panicking.

    I completely understand how frustrating this has to be for you. But I also know that it's pretty bad for him, too. And it has been bad for awhile.

    So you and your husband can get together and decide what you will and won't get on board with, and then let your son decide what he's going to do about the new rules, but I hope you will consider finding someone who is good at this to sit down with the three of you and help your son explain to you why he is withdrawing from classes or just not going -- he may need to figure it out himself before he can explain -- and then help the three of you come up with a plan going forward that helps your son make a good adult life for himself, which I know is what you want, with whatever support you and your husband are willing and able to give him and without you feeling used.

    Good luck to you all.
    7 answers · Higher Education (University +) · 2 days ago
  • How do i become a nurse?

    Best answer: In the US - Community colleges do offer two year nursing programs. The job opportune and pay will not be as good as having a Bachelor degree in nursing. Your four year Bachelor degree will include your general education and prerequisite classes. Your last two years of your Bachelor degree will be mostly your... show more
    Best answer: In the US -
    Community colleges do offer two year nursing programs. The job opportune and pay will not be as good as having a Bachelor degree in nursing.

    Your four year Bachelor degree will include your general education and prerequisite classes. Your last two years of your Bachelor degree will be mostly your classes for your major of nursing.

    As a junior in high school you are your parent really need to be going on college visits right now. Meet with admissions and the head of the nursing department at the school. Call the admissions two weeks ahead of the visit to set up meetings, also ask for a tour of the campus. You need to get moving on this. You should visit 2/4 schools.
    Have you taken the SAT/ACT?
    8 answers · Higher Education (University +) · 2 days ago
  • Careers working with special needs? Pay decent?

    Best answer: There are a lot of things you can do. You're right: the pay tends not to be great, because disabled people are devalued. You could look into the durable medical equipment field. You could be someone who works with medical and para-medical professionals to help people get, and maintain, assistive... show more
    Best answer: There are a lot of things you can do. You're right: the pay tends not to be great, because disabled people are devalued.

    You could look into the durable medical equipment field. You could be someone who works with medical and para-medical professionals to help people get, and maintain, assistive technology like wheelchairs and augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) devices. This is life-changing work. (Try calling the wheelchair clinic at a local rehab hospital and asking for the contact information for DME suppliers in your area, to see whether you can shadow a rep.)

    If you are interested in direct service provision, Speech Language Pathologists (SLP's) can help people learn to use AAC devices. You could become an Orientation and Mobility (O and M) Specialist and teach blind people to get around in the world.

    You could look into working at a center for independent living. If you're in the U.S., you can find a local CIL by looking it up at the ncil.org website. These do not tend to be highly-paid positions, but I know people who used to work at the local CIL who now have jobs in local government and so on, so it might be a good place to start. There are teams at CILs that do things like helping people who do not want to be institutionalized connect with the services to enable them to live in the community. There are teams that work on laws and policies to enable living in the community in the first place. Getting to know people at your local CIL is also a great way to start networking, so while the pay may mean you never want to work there, I would still approach them if I were you.

    Rehab counseling might be an interesting field for you. I have a couple of friends with master's degrees in that field. There is quite a range of work open to people.

    You might be interested in working in a college or university disability services department. Those people evaluate evidence that a person has a disability and determine how to address barriers in the educational environment. Your school's office may have someone who is willing to meet with you and discuss this; it's also possible that you would qualify for a work-study job there.

    Do languages interest you? There is always a need for ASL interpreters. Just recently I was in a discussion about the length of time it takes to arrange for terps for a meeting, and there are definitely interpreting jobs going unfilled. Deaf people generally do not regard themselves as disabled, but I am guessing you wouldn't rule them out as a community to work with.

    If you like working with animals, you might be interested in working for an organization that trains and places service dogs (or horses).

    If you are interested in becoming a lawyer or paralegal, disability law is an interesting field. Again, if you are in the U.S., the nearest Protection and Advocacy (P and A) organization might be a place to ask about the real-world prospects for jobs; unfortunately I don't have that information handy. Try ndrn.org for information.

    I do want to offer you one tip. The euphemism "special needs" is popular in service provision to children, where nondisabled adults control the language. Adults with disabilities don't tend to like it so much (see: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=tZ7l-lFJpR0 for a funny video). You might get better results using the word "disability" instead of a euphemism like "special needs," "challenged," " differently abled," "handi-capable," etc. Some people like "people with disabilities," some like "disabled people," and yes, some like euphemisms. But the word "disability" is probably your best bet as a default, before you learn how a specific person identifies.

    Good luck! I hope you find a career path that is fulfilling and that comes with a decent paycheck.
    6 answers · Higher Education (University +) · 2 days ago
  • Hello I have a question?

    29 answers · Trivia · 5 days ago
  • What is the difference between Client, consumer and customer?

    Best answer: I would say a client would go to such as a solicitor, a consumer is people eating things or using things and a customer goes to ordinary shops food shops etc.
    Best answer: I would say a client would go to such as a solicitor, a consumer is people eating things or using things and a customer goes to ordinary shops food shops etc.
    11 answers · Words & Wordplay · 1 day ago