• Why is intermarriage between Jews and Arabs seen as taboo in Israel?

    Best answer: I'm pretty sure BLM Toronto and other groups will challenge the notion that racism is non-existent in Canada. Personally, I think it's pretty minor up there, but not eradicated. Now, I think it's better to say that intermarriage between Jews and Arabs is seen as taboo for religious reasons, not... show more
    Best answer: I'm pretty sure BLM Toronto and other groups will challenge the notion that racism is non-existent in Canada. Personally, I think it's pretty minor up there, but not eradicated.

    Now, I think it's better to say that intermarriage between Jews and Arabs is seen as taboo for religious reasons, not necessarily racial ones. After all, the same taboo exists between Arab Christians and Arab Muslims, where racism cannot be a factor. Now, there are those who'd oppose it on those grounds, but if an Arab converts to Judaism or a Jew converts to Christianity or Islam, then it's Kosher/Halal as far as one group is concerned. Of course, things are WAY more complicated than that; however, it's still a better and easy way to look at the situation.

    The religious taboo of intermarriage between all of these groups mainly comes into play when some clergy may fear that any kids won't be raised under their religion. That at least seems to be a huge concern of those who complain about it. However, not everyone has this taboo, and there are those who get married via another nation (often Cyprus) who isn't restricted to clergy-based marriages. There are also a lot of Israelis abroad who may marry someone outside of their faith (and race, if we're still talking about that) and they're generally well-accepted back home. It also needs to be said that secular marriages are being pushed strongly by the secular Israelis.

    Also, one more thing to consider is the mixing of Jewish ethnic groups between each other. While it's thought that many of these groups have a common ancestor, to the outside many will only see a "white" (Ashkenazi) guy/girl with a "brown" (Mizrahi) guy/girl. You can substitute Sephardi Jews in there as well, or Jews from other groups such as those from India or those from Ethiopia. From a purely racial standpoint, Israel starts to look more mixed when most children are coming from "multiracial" backgrounds rather than those that are uniformly one or the other. Of course, they all see themselves as Jewish regardless, but from your prospective it'll stop looking so racially pure.

    As for your last question - Why are people in Israel opposed to racism be (sic) eliminated in their country? - my answer for that is simply that they aren't as a whole. They're much like most nations and would rather fight racism than embrace it. However, bigotry does remain because Israel is in a conflict that sometimes notes racial implications. Arab suicide attacks, for instance, make the Israeli Jewish populace a bit wary because the race of the attacker is uniform. It is of course wrong to say that all Arabs are like that, but that doesn't always comfort or convince some people especially if they've been burned (perhaps literally). To put it another way: Israel is populated with humans, therefore there will be some racism. It's not missing in any nation, Canada included. But much like with Canada, it's myopic to focus on that issue when describing Israel. Israelis actually are far more open than you'd think.
    23 answers · 2 days ago
  • Were the Jews responsible for 9/11?

    20 answers · 6 days ago
  • Is Judaism a Supremacy?

    Best answer: According to the haters, yes. And most will pull out "evidence" that at best consists of misunderstandings of the religion and at worst will be completely made up.

    According to the Jews themselves, no. Most will laugh about the suggestion and exclaim, "WHERE?".
    Best answer: According to the haters, yes. And most will pull out "evidence" that at best consists of misunderstandings of the religion and at worst will be completely made up.

    According to the Jews themselves, no. Most will laugh about the suggestion and exclaim, "WHERE?".
    12 answers · 4 days ago
  • In the upcoming meeting will Netanyahu con Donald Trump into sacrificing the lives of more American Christians in yet another war for Israel?

    Best answer: To some of us people living on the European Continent, this Jewish control over the American Administration, brings memories of the Jewish people living in Germany for Hundreds of years applying the same amount of pressure to the German political parties. Everything was run or owned by a few Jewish families during... show more
    Best answer: To some of us people living on the European Continent, this Jewish control over the American Administration, brings memories of the Jewish people living in Germany for Hundreds of years applying the same amount of pressure to the German political parties.
    Everything was run or owned by a few Jewish families during that time.
    Life and living was so easy for them, they even had managed to develop their own Yiddish tongue. They would have never expected or imagined the ugly turn of events to follow during the 2nd World War.
    I see the same simpleton mistakes being repeated by these otherwise lovely people of the Orient.
    If they push the American Christians too far, things will most definitely backfire with unforeseen (to them at least) results.
    I hope I am wrong in this prediction for their sake and well being, but it doesn't look that way. These Hebrew political leaders of theirs are either too dumb or too ignorant in my book.
    Mr. Netanyahu's family is accused of stealing money from the poor only because it was so easy to get it from the American taxpayer.


    Thank you for sharing

    Greetings
    18 answers · 7 days ago
  • Does a conversion make a Jew?

    Best answer: The basic answer is yes it does. However, we Jews do tend to make things more complicated than they should be, which is where your confusion may come from. Aside from one small Syriac community, Judaism allows for people to convert into the religion. All sects have ways to allow people to convert; however, the... show more
    Best answer: The basic answer is yes it does. However, we Jews do tend to make things more complicated than they should be, which is where your confusion may come from.

    Aside from one small Syriac community, Judaism allows for people to convert into the religion. All sects have ways to allow people to convert; however, the standards for conversion are not universal throughout the board. Because of that, some sects may not recognize converts of others, because the criteria these converts had to fulfill were not sufficient for these other sects and their conversion programs. For example, the Reform have a comparatively easy program for conversion compared to the Orthodox, and thus the Orthodox will look at that Reform person as a non-Jew. They'll recognize that the person wants to become a Jew, but by their own criteria won't recognize them as following through and completing their conversion.

    Keep in mind that these differences do not change one thing: Conversion is allowed, and that makes them fully Jewish. As per the law of Jewish society, this should be unquestioned, especially with how hard it is to convert into the religion. Even the easiest conversion is far more than you'd see with Christian and Islamic ones. Jews who deny the Jewishness of converts are going against what the religion says. The difference lies in disagreements in what makes a conversion.

    Now, some of what you have written are things that have been said of converts. It's rare that their Jewishness of converts is questioned, but it does happen. However, I have yet to hear of a case where, when brought up to the community, that Jew's questioning of the convert went unquestioned: When it goes beyond those two people, it'll eventually get to someone who will call them out for doing something so un-Jewish.

    The "never be truly Jewish" thing is something that has happened as well, and part of that deals with the conflation of Judaism as a religion with the utilization of the term for ethnic terms. Well, as far as the religion goes, they're Jewish and fully so. I've had to call out someone myself for insulting a friend of mine this way, and I think I made her feel like a moron when she realized that she had no idea what she was talking about. It is true that converts can't become Ashkenazi, Sephardi, Mizrahi, etc., as those are ethnic terms that are more static. After all, African Americans can't become white; however, there is a reason those terms exist independently than Jew. The term doesn't care if someone is one thing or the other, and while some ethnic terms have a strong relation with the Jewish religion it isn't required as per Judaism to be of those ethnities.

    Lastly, I'll say that these beliefs are dying of more or less, and in some communities are virtually non-existent. My synagogue has so many Jews of alternate upbringings and even "half-Jews" whose Jewishness isn't questioned (the half meaning half of an ethnic Jew, it doesn't refer to the religion). I know it's still out there, but I most converts know that they're accepted by the Jewish community at large.
    14 answers · 7 days ago
  • Between President Donald Trump and the war criminal Benjamin Netanyahu - who is more arrogant?

    Best answer: I dunno, but Nethuhu sure looks weird, kinda like a rat wearing a hairpiece .
    Best answer: I dunno, but Nethuhu sure looks weird, kinda like a rat wearing a hairpiece .
    14 answers · 1 week ago
  • Would the Jewish State of Israel exist today if the Holocaust never happened. Or would the majority of Israeli Jews be living in Europe?

    Best answer: I think that Israel would exist today, if the Holocaust never happened. For one, there was a lot of push to create it, and the support for Israel pre-WWII was quite strong and only gaining in momentum. Had there not been a genocide that drastically reduced the number of Jews, it's very likely that the... show more
    Best answer: I think that Israel would exist today, if the Holocaust never happened.

    For one, there was a lot of push to create it, and the support for Israel pre-WWII was quite strong and only gaining in momentum. Had there not been a genocide that drastically reduced the number of Jews, it's very likely that the immigration there would've been much larger than what we saw in this reality.

    Jews definitely would've continued flocking to the State of Israel, as they have decades after independence. Let's not forget that there were conditions that allowed for the Holocaust and the killing of millions of Jews to occur, and had the Holocaust not happen there would be less to combat this bigotry. Many places still didn't grant Jews equal rights, or subjugated them to horrific conditions. In other places, it was a denial of opportunity, and a clear indication by society that they had no intention of seeing the Jews as equal citizens. Anti-Semitism in public only became a social faux pas in many places because of the horrors of the Holocaust. That continued bigotry, in conjunction with seeing how they could be respected elsewhere, would force a lot of Jews out. It's what happened with Jews coming to America, and it happened with the Holy Land as well. There is nothing to suggest that it wouldn't continue, as long as Israel is there.

    Now, that's just Europe. Let's not forget that a significant amount of Israeli Jews are of communities that remained in the Middle East. The bigotry in the Middle East was growing and it was pushing Jews out before Israel came about. The hatred of Jews displayed after Israel's founding had nothing to do with the Holocaust, so we'd see Jews fleeing in this alternate reality as well. The mere founding of Israel would be enough to guarantee mass departure of the Jews. I know some people love to rely on the history the Jews had in Muslim nations and how rosy it can be portrayed, but that history is full of horrible things done to the Jews as well and the bad times were being signaled decades before 1948. The Pan-Arab movements of the '20s, at least, didn't include the Jewish populace in them, despite those communities being among the most ancient there.

    To add, I'll point out that even after the founding of Israel and it's immediate effects, Israel still drew in lots of Jews. The Holocaust had nothing to do with the Soviet Union, of which Israel absorbed in a lot of Jews when the Iron Curtain fell. The Holocaust also had no bearing on the Islamic Revolution of Iran and changes to that society, which contributed hundreds of thousands of Jews to Israel as they left that life behind. The Ethiopian Jews make up a full percent of Israeli society, and that's significant as well. Today, a significant chunk of French Jews are considering leaving, as are most Turkish ones, and of course Ukrainian Jews have left in large numbers as well. We keep seeing strong immigration to Israel.

    Of course, all this people gathering suggests is that there would be enough to keep Israel going, or at least enough external support to get Israel pushed as an independent state. This doesn't suggest that Israel would survive that initial wave of Arab aggression, which few onlookers did think. However, as things were still rather bleak for the Jews there, even without the Holocaust happening. There was still motivation to fight for their own nation, and the belief that if they lost that horrific things would've been done to them and their families. It's that motivation that many people think drove the Jews to fight, especially those who had just witnessed the horrors of the Holocaust. I think the Israeli drive would've remained and it would've sustained Israel.
    9 answers · 6 days ago
  • Do Orthodox Jews even work?

    Or do they bury their faces in Torah all day?
    Or do they bury their faces in Torah all day?
    8 answers · 5 days ago
  • Does Judaism have concept of hell?

    Best answer: We find a place called Gehinom (hell) mentioned in the Bible & discussed at length in the Talmud & many classic Jewish works. Think of it as a sort of laundromat to clean up souls that have been soiled in their passage through this world. Once sparkling clean, they can continue up to their spiritual place... show more
    Best answer: We find a place called Gehinom (hell) mentioned in the Bible & discussed at length in the Talmud & many classic Jewish works. Think of it as a sort of laundromat to clean up souls that have been soiled in their passage through this world. Once sparkling clean, they can continue up to their spiritual place from whence they originated, & even higher.

    Also, there are those who commit sins as a result of extreme stress. Then it's left up to God (the Knower of All Souls) to know whether this person really had any free choice. According to that knowledge will be the clean up afforded that soul.
    12 answers · 1 week ago
  • Do you agree that Israel should annex the West Bank & expel any Palestinian who doesn't agree to follow Israeli laws to another Arab country?

    Best answer: I do not agree with that action. If the West Bank is annexed, then you have to take in with it the Arab population. Israel has done so with all the Arab populations who were there to be absorbed in the past, so the precedent is there. If they fail to follow Israeli laws, then fines or incarceration are the... show more
    Best answer: I do not agree with that action. If the West Bank is annexed, then you have to take in with it the Arab population. Israel has done so with all the Arab populations who were there to be absorbed in the past, so the precedent is there. If they fail to follow Israeli laws, then fines or incarceration are the appropriate response.

    As for the strategic location that is the West Bank: Israel knows, and addresses that with any peace agreement in front of them. They're not going to give it away without some sort of safeguard.
    6 answers · 5 days ago
  • What Israel borders u see as fitting? Gaza , West Bank, Golan, Sinai?

    Best answer: all of the land promised to them in the OT by God
    Best answer: all of the land promised to them in the OT by God
    4 answers · 3 days ago
  • What will happen if America and U.K stopped supporting Israel?

    Best answer: Israel will soldier on... Keep in mind that when Israel became independent in 1948, they were attacked on all sides without ANY help from the Americans or the British. The Americans weren't so friendly to them back then, and the British just got the hell out of there and had no interest in giving any... show more
    Best answer: Israel will soldier on...

    Keep in mind that when Israel became independent in 1948, they were attacked on all sides without ANY help from the Americans or the British. The Americans weren't so friendly to them back then, and the British just got the hell out of there and had no interest in giving any assistance. All Israel got were donations from Jews who could spare them, but donations only go so far when you're surrounded, outnumbered and outgunned. The major wars of Israel's history were all fought pretty much by Israel alone, with minimal assistance at best and never in the form of troops.

    Israel has never forgotten this, and even military-age Israelis today often know people who have lost their lives to terrorism or war. They have not forgotten how to stay prepared in today's world, and while they appreciate the assistance the US gives them they never solely rely on it.

    So what will happen? Things will get tougher as money becomes tighter in areas....but, even in the case of war, Israel will fight on and, if their history is anything to go off of, come out victorious with their existence intact.
    16 answers · 1 week ago
  • Why is stating that the Holocaust was exaggerated considered Holocaust Denial and therefore Anti-semitic?

    Best answer: and you are a professor of what primal instinct ?
    Best answer: and you are a professor of what primal instinct ?
    12 answers · 1 week ago
  • Is Israel the only democracy in the Middle East?

    Why do Muslims hate democracy (Israel)
    Why do Muslims hate democracy (Israel)
    15 answers · 1 week ago
  • Why don't ultra orthodox jews want to defend their country?

    Best answer: It's easier to be a war mongering bigoted ultraconservative loudmouth when you don't have to worry about your or your family fighting, getting maimed and getting killed.
    Best answer: It's easier to be a war mongering bigoted ultraconservative loudmouth when you don't have to worry about your or your family fighting, getting maimed and getting killed.
    6 answers · 6 days ago