• What are the five elements of Nature ?

    12 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Is an element the same as an atom?

    Is an element the same as an atom?

    Best answer: absolutely not. ********** let's start by defining an atom. .. "an atom is a tiny particle of matter consisting of a nucleus which contains .. .at least 1 proton surrounded by a field of electrons. That nucleus MAY .. .contain 1 more neutrons," looks something like this... show more
    Best answer: absolutely not.

    **********
    let's start by defining an atom.
    .. "an atom is a tiny particle of matter consisting of a nucleus which contains
    .. .at least 1 proton surrounded by a field of electrons. That nucleus MAY
    .. .contain 1 more neutrons,"

    looks something like this
    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c...
    the blue and red spheres represent protons and neutrons.

    **********
    now.. imagine this. Imagine you raided your grandmothers pantry and collected a couple of hundred perfectly clean mason jars. and you lined them all up on your lab bench. Then you took a sharpie and wrote on one jar.
    .. "atoms with 1 proton"
    and on a different jar
    .. "atoms with 2 protons"
    and on a different jar
    .. "atoms with 3 protons"
    .. etc
    until all the jars were labeled

    now image you have a super powerful microscope. So powerful you could see individual atoms. So powerful that you could actually see inside each atom and see the nucleus. And so powerful that you could actually count protons.

    now imagine you have a super sharp pair of tweezers. So sharp that you could pick up a single atom.

    now imagine you have a huge pile of atoms. All different shapes and sizes. And you have an infinite amount of time on your hands....

    And you start sorting.
    .. into the jar labeled "atoms with 1 proton".. ..go all the atoms with 1 proton
    .. into the jar labeled "atoms with 2 protons".. go all the atoms with exactly 2 protons
    ......
    .. into the jar labeled "atoms with 92 protons".. go all the atoms with exactly 92 protons

    ************
    when you're done sorting, you think to yourself.. "self. atoms with x protons is just too long and too impersonal. I'm going to give these jars better names"
    .. and you write on the jar of atoms with exactly 1 proton... "hydrogen"
    .. and you write on the jar of atoms with exaclty 2 protons.. "helium"
    .. etc
    .. and you write on the jar of atoms with exactly 92 protons.. "uranium"
    ...etc
    until all the jars are renamed.

    **********
    now you start inspecting each jar and you notice something unusual. Although all the atoms have the same number of protons in any jar, they have different numbers of neutrons. The all react chemically about the same. But they have different masses and different stabilities. So you decide you need a naming system to identify atoms in the same jar that have different numbers of neutrons... and you come up with the term.. "ISOTOPES". "Iso" meaning "same".. and "topes" meaning "place". They come from the "same place".. i.e.. they are in the same JAR.

    AND, you do one more thing. You identify which of those atoms are stable. And you measure the mass of those atoms on a balance. And you average those masses of those stable atoms (weighted by the percent abundance of each of those stable isotopes) and you write that weighted average mass on the outside of the jar. And you call that weighted average mass... "relative atomic mass"

    ********
    ********
    ATOMS are those individual particles
    ELEMENTS are the mason jars
    ISOTOPES are atoms with the same number of protons.. with different numbers of neutrons

    the PERIODIC TABLE shows the mason jars, and the number of protons in each atom in that jar (the atomic number) and the weighted average mass of the stable atoms of any given element (unless it's shown in parenthesis which means there are no stable isotopes of that element and the atomic mass of the most stable element is shown in the parenthesis).
    9 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • WHICH IS BIGGER KB 0R MB?

    8 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Does the number of protons determine place in the periodic table?

    Best answer: Yes, the number of protons does determine where they are placed on the periodic table. The atomic number says how many protons are in that specific element. To be considered a gold atom you would need the 79 protons. Neutrons do NOT determine whether the atom is a gold.
    Best answer: Yes, the number of protons does determine where they are placed on the periodic table. The atomic number says how many protons are in that specific element. To be considered a gold atom you would need the 79 protons. Neutrons do NOT determine whether the atom is a gold.
    5 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • What is endothermic and exothermic?

    5 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • NaCl stands for what?

    8 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • What is the difference between an atom and a molecule?

    Best answer: Molecules are made up of atoms
    Best answer: Molecules are made up of atoms
    4 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Is coffee a substance or a mixture?

    4 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Is chemistry awesome?

    Best answer: totally
    Best answer: totally
    5 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • 3.6g of H2X contains 0.4 moles of hydrogen atom. What is the atomic weight of X ?

    Best answer: (0.4 mol H) × (1 mol X / 2 mol H) = 0.2 mol X

    (0.4 mol H) × (1.007947 g H/mol) = 0.40318 g H

    (3.6 g total) - (0.40318 g H) = 3.2 g X

    (3.2 g X) / (0.2 mol X) = 16 g X/mol
    Best answer: (0.4 mol H) × (1 mol X / 2 mol H) = 0.2 mol X

    (0.4 mol H) × (1.007947 g H/mol) = 0.40318 g H

    (3.6 g total) - (0.40318 g H) = 3.2 g X

    (3.2 g X) / (0.2 mol X) = 16 g X/mol
    4 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • 11. How can the specific heat be characterized for a material that heats up quickly?

    Best answer: Specific heat shows how much heat it is necessary to give something (when its weight is 1 kg) to increase its temperature by 1 degree C. Its dimension looks like J/(kg*C). If some material heats up quickly, it needs less energy to become hot (in other words it needs less temperature to heat up). Compare heating... show more
    Best answer: Specific heat shows how much heat it is necessary to give something (when its weight is 1 kg) to increase its temperature by 1 degree C. Its dimension looks like J/(kg*C). If some material heats up quickly, it needs less energy to become hot (in other words it needs less temperature to heat up). Compare heating water and something metallic. When you heat the first substance, you need to give it more energy because water is covalent and it can`t conduct heat. Metal conducts heat so it becomes hot quicklier than water even when you heat them in similar conditions. So metal needs less energy because it has lower specific heat than water has (this difference is about five times).

    So It has a low specific heat.
    4 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Did you know that water is wet?

    Best answer: Not when it's not wet.
    Best answer: Not when it's not wet.
    4 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • How would you determine the density of a gas sample collected using a syringe?

    Please answer my chemistry question. thank you so much!
    Please answer my chemistry question. thank you so much!
    4 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Does methane (CH4) have a line-angle structure?

    Best answer: No, we just write CH4.
    Best answer: No, we just write CH4.
    4 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Why isn t water flammable?

    water consists of hydrogen and oxygen. hydrogen is fuel, on with oxygen you have two parts of the fire triangle so why is it that when you apply heat (I.e. throwing a match into a tub of water) it doesn t go up in flames?
    water consists of hydrogen and oxygen. hydrogen is fuel, on with oxygen you have two parts of the fire triangle so why is it that when you apply heat (I.e. throwing a match into a tub of water) it doesn t go up in flames?
    4 answers · 2 weeks ago