• How do you say water in Spanish?

    33 answers · 4 days ago
  • What's slang for the male version of a "cougar"?

    Best answer: It's called: a manther..
    Best answer: It's called: a manther..
    19 answers · 2 days ago
  • By definition, a miracle is something which could only happen by divine intervention. True or false?

    Do you have a better answer? Can you improve on this definition?
    Do you have a better answer? Can you improve on this definition?
    13 answers · 1 day ago
  • Should I learn French or German?

    Best answer: It may depend on where you live. Also, I'll point out that since you know Spanish, French will probably be easier for you than German, because Spanish and French are both derived from Latin. I don't know French. But I will say that German grammar is more complex than English and Spanish, and probably more... show more
    Best answer: It may depend on where you live.
    Also, I'll point out that since you know Spanish, French will probably be easier for you than German, because Spanish and French are both derived from Latin.
    I don't know French. But I will say that German grammar is more complex than English and Spanish, and probably more complex than French.
    So, if you want to learn more, and have a greater understanding of how language works, I might recommend German.
    The English language has derived a lot from all three of these languages.
    And the more languages you learn, the easier it gets to learn a new one.
    13 answers · 3 days ago
  • What is something cool to learn?

    7 answers · 22 hours ago
  • Native English speakers: Are there any difference between "a ticket to" and "a ticket for"?

    Best answer: In that context, 'to' and 'for' are interchangeable. By the way, surely you would say 'the' new Star Wars, not 'a'. In other contexts: I've bought a ticket to London. I've bought a ticket for the 8 am train to London. I bought a ticket TO GO to the exhibition ... BUT I... show more
    Best answer: In that context, 'to' and 'for' are interchangeable.
    By the way, surely you would say 'the' new Star Wars, not 'a'.

    In other contexts:
    I've bought a ticket to London.
    I've bought a ticket for the 8 am train to London.
    I bought a ticket TO GO to the exhibition ... BUT I bought a ticket FOR the exhibition ..
    10 answers · 2 days ago
  • How do you learn to speak Chinese in 2 days?

    so when I first applied for my job I kinda lied too my boss and told him I can speak Chinese so it would seem like i have actual talents and don't spent my free time reading fan fiction. Surprisingly a year later he still remembers it and now he wants me to fly to china with him to be translator..
    so when I first applied for my job I kinda lied too my boss and told him I can speak Chinese so it would seem like i have actual talents and don't spent my free time reading fan fiction. Surprisingly a year later he still remembers it and now he wants me to fly to china with him to be translator..
    9 answers · 2 days ago
  • Is it correcto to say "I shaved my head", "I shaved my beard", "I shaved my moustache", "I shaved my armpit, my groin"?

    Is it correcto to say "I shaved my head", "I shaved my beard", "I shaved my moustache", "I shaved my armpit, my groin"? If not, how to say them? ***PLEASE, tell me if you are an English native speaker or not and tell me if your English is American, British, etc.
    Is it correcto to say "I shaved my head", "I shaved my beard", "I shaved my moustache", "I shaved my armpit, my groin"? If not, how to say them? ***PLEASE, tell me if you are an English native speaker or not and tell me if your English is American, British, etc.
    15 answers · 4 days ago
  • Is Portuguese the world's easiest language?

    Best answer: There is no such thing as a language that is universally easy. Difficulty depends on how different the foreign language is from the languages you already know. As for native languages, all are equally easy as a first language. They all take years to master (we simply don't remember how hard it was or how... show more
    Best answer: There is no such thing as a language that is universally easy. Difficulty depends on how different the foreign language is from the languages you already know.

    As for native languages, all are equally easy as a first language. They all take years to master (we simply don't remember how hard it was or how long it took). A child learns everything about their first language from scratch, including every single sound, word order, meanings, etc.

    For an English speaker learning a first foreign language, Portuguese is one of several natural languages that are among the easiest to learn for most people, per the American Foreign Service Institute. All other Latin evolved languages are in that group as well. They are more similar than different. The differences are minor and balance out in the end. Most other Germanic languages (like English) are also in that group, except for German, Icelandic, and Faroese.

    A Japanese speaker, for example, would find very little in common with Portuguese. Almost everything would be alien: several of the sounds. Many of the syllable patterns. Almost every word. Word order. Verb tenses (Japanese only has verbal aspects). Conjugation patterns (Japanese verbs do not reflect person or number). Personal pronouns are barely used in Japanese and function quite differently. Japanese lacks a word that corresponds to "have" and has three basic words for "be" that are not interchangeable.

    The idea that there IS an easiest language for the world is false.

    Note also: Esperanto, a constructed language, is considerably easier for an English speaker (and for many other languages) than Portuguese, requiring only 150 hours of study instead of 600 to reach competency (not fluency). Esperanto is designed to have simple rules without exceptions and to appeal to a wide variety of language backgrounds, but its difficulty level is still relative. Some learners would still find it alien enough. Portuguese is not designed (it evolved) and has a fair amount of inflection (which is notoriously difficult for any outsider learning such a language, and is even more alien if the learner speaks no languages that have any sort of inflection).
    5 answers · 1 day ago
  • Language: is the sentence correct? "Chinese population was over 100 million, 900 years ago."?

    Best answer: It would be better to say "900 years ago, the population of China was over 100 million."
    Best answer: It would be better to say "900 years ago, the population of China was over 100 million."
    10 answers · 3 days ago
  • Does everyone speak English in Malta?

    7 answers · 2 days ago
  • Where I can to find Spanish people in Canada?

    Best answer: Osoyoos, BC is the "Spanish Capital of Canada," and, last I heard, there was one Spanish family living there.

    Spanish people can be found all over the country, but, mostly as individuals, or families, and not in groups. They make up less than 2% of Canadians.
    Best answer: Osoyoos, BC is the "Spanish Capital of Canada," and, last I heard, there was one Spanish family living there.

    Spanish people can be found all over the country, but, mostly as individuals, or families, and not in groups. They make up less than 2% of Canadians.
    9 answers · 3 days ago
  • Is it two foot or two feet?

    13 answers · 4 days ago
  • How do you interpret the phrase: "The nonpersistence of memory"?

    Best answer: It means that you FORGOT.

    Impersistence!
    Best answer: It means that you FORGOT.

    Impersistence!
    10 answers · 4 days ago
  • What is the most polite way to order food in French?

    I’ve only ever learned how to say “Je voudrais” (I would like), but to me that sounds a tad bit rude? In English I would usually say “can i have” or “may I have”. If “je voudrais” is widely accepted and the normal way of ordering I am totally ok with that, I just want to make sure I am using the most widely... show more
    I’ve only ever learned how to say “Je voudrais” (I would like), but to me that sounds a tad bit rude? In English I would usually say “can i have” or “may I have”. If “je voudrais” is widely accepted and the normal way of ordering I am totally ok with that, I just want to make sure I am using the most widely accepted and polite way of ordering. Thank you!
    7 answers · 3 days ago