• If a person picks up a language faster than others, does that mean they’re better than others?

    Best answer: The notion that some people are better than others, over all, is silly. So, the answer, is "no", of course. I am very good at learning languages and good in math, but I am terrible at dealing with people. My sister is great at dealing people, horrible in math, and although she has not learned a single... show more
    Best answer: The notion that some people are better than others, over all, is silly.

    So, the answer, is "no", of course.

    I am very good at learning languages and good in math, but I am terrible at dealing with people. My sister is great at dealing people, horrible in math, and although she has not learned a single language, I imagine she would do well, since she picked up enough to communicate a few basic things while traveling in Europe, simply by interacting with people.

    Some people who picked up another language fast are racists. That's a very bad trait. Others are not.

    You can't measure a person's worth or superiority, so it's a worthless concept. Thinking in those terms is a form of prejudice.
    14 answers · 1 day ago
  • How do I forget how to speak English?

    9 answers · 1 day ago
  • Hello! I would like to know which of the following variants is the correct one, if is possible from a native english speaker😁?

    “Doing this since you didn’t even knew it was cool” “Doing this before you know it’s cool” “Doing this before you know it was cool” If none of the variants is correct, how should I formulate? I'm referring to snowboarding.
    “Doing this since you didn’t even knew it was cool” “Doing this before you know it’s cool” “Doing this before you know it was cool” If none of the variants is correct, how should I formulate? I'm referring to snowboarding.
    10 answers · 2 days ago
  • Friends,lox is actually salmon, why don't they just say salmon and bagel, dammit, ur opinion?

    Best answer: Well, lox is simpler to say. Salmon and bagel has 5 syllables.
    Best answer: Well, lox is simpler to say. Salmon and bagel has 5 syllables.
    8 answers · 1 day ago
  • How are "multi" and "anti" pronounced?

    (mul•tee) and (an•tee) or (mul•tie) and (an•tie)
    (mul•tee) and (an•tee) or (mul•tie) and (an•tie)
    7 answers · 17 hours ago
  • Do the Quebecois Speak Substandard French?

    Best answer: As a native French person and although Quebecois have a strong accent and different expressions and words, we understand them. Either we live in Paris or in the south / est / west of France. No matter, since it's the same French. We also find their accent somewhat funny, but I bet they find ours funny as... show more
    Best answer: As a native French person and although Quebecois have a strong accent and different expressions and words, we understand them. Either we live in Paris or in the south / est / west of France. No matter, since it's the same French.

    We also find their accent somewhat funny, but I bet they find ours funny as well.. lol
    7 answers · 1 day ago
  • Do languages need diphthongs?

    14 answers · 4 days ago
  • Body language meaning - arm around the shoulder with closed fist?
  • Does this phrase natural in English?

    Best answer: Note: "Does this sentence seem natural in English?"

    "Wilted" normally applies to plants which look sad because they have suffered during a long hot summer when they have not been watered. Thus "wilted" does not apply to the appearance of plants during winter.
    Best answer: Note: "Does this sentence seem natural in English?"

    "Wilted" normally applies to plants which look sad because they have suffered during a long hot summer when they have not been watered. Thus "wilted" does not apply to the appearance of plants during winter.
    12 answers · 4 days ago
  • French Indirect Object qusetion?

    Hi, 1) I'm kindly asking why you have "à" in this sentence. Il apprend aux élèves à compter. So, I know that when you are adding an infinitive after "apprendre," you should add "à." But I think you already have ""à" in "aux élèves," which means you... show more
    Hi, 1) I'm kindly asking why you have "à" in this sentence. Il apprend aux élèves à compter. So, I know that when you are adding an infinitive after "apprendre," you should add "à." But I think you already have ""à" in "aux élèves," which means you have two "à." can you tell me why you have to add an additional "à" before compter. 2) Then, does this sentence make sense? J'excite aux gens à voir (literally, I am excited to seem the people) thanks in advance
    5 answers · 16 hours ago
  • Can native English people read this?

    Can native English people read this?

    Best answer: Not unless they've studied Early Modern English (as I have).
    I wrote my English Lit final in Elizabethan iambic pentameter.
    That's an image of Shakespeare's will.
    Best answer: Not unless they've studied Early Modern English (as I have).
    I wrote my English Lit final in Elizabethan iambic pentameter.
    That's an image of Shakespeare's will.
    10 answers · 3 days ago
  • Native English speakers, are these sentences correct:?

    a) "She going to watch the game ON LIVE." b) "He's fit for the job." (Also, in this sense, does 'fit' only imply in physical terms, or could it mean both physically and mentally?)
    a) "She going to watch the game ON LIVE." b) "He's fit for the job." (Also, in this sense, does 'fit' only imply in physical terms, or could it mean both physically and mentally?)
    5 answers · 18 hours ago
  • Should/can I translate my own book?

    I speak German, Danish, and English (and I'm studying Korean), so let's pretend I've written a book, and I want to publish it in different languages. Since I already speak more than one language, is that something I can do on my own?
    I speak German, Danish, and English (and I'm studying Korean), so let's pretend I've written a book, and I want to publish it in different languages. Since I already speak more than one language, is that something I can do on my own?
    6 answers · 2 days ago
  • Can you help me explain this English sentence?

    “The disease has historically circulated in Africa.” I just can't get it.... does it mean that the disease spread in the past in Africa? If not, can you rephrase it to me please? Thanks a lot in advance 🙏🏻
    “The disease has historically circulated in Africa.” I just can't get it.... does it mean that the disease spread in the past in Africa? If not, can you rephrase it to me please? Thanks a lot in advance 🙏🏻
    7 answers · 3 days ago
  • What is Good Mum in French?

    5 answers · 2 days ago