• Is this sentence grammatically correct? "They having arrived, we went out on the lawn for our picnic."?

    Best answer: It's extremely formal, and very old-fashioned, but it is in fact perfectly correct. Note that with this construction, there is no suggestion that 'they' ALSO went out onto the lawn with 'we'. It tells us ONLY that after they had arrived, or once they had arrived, 'we' went out onto the... show more
    Best answer: It's extremely formal, and very old-fashioned, but it is in fact perfectly correct.

    Note that with this construction, there is no suggestion that 'they' ALSO went out onto the lawn with 'we'. It tells us ONLY that after they had arrived, or once they had arrived, 'we' went out onto the lawn'. 'They' may or may not have gone out with you; either is possible, but the construction doesn't allow you to assume it.

    If you have ever done any Latin, you'll recognise this as an 'absolute' phrase, eg 'Caesar having arrived, the soldiers advanced on the enemy' or 'The bridge having been built, the soldiers ran across it'. .
    11 answers · 2 days ago
  • Can you describe winter in one word?

    Best answer: Bitter
    Best answer: Bitter
    26 answers · 3 days ago
  • All you need is?

    Best answer: $1M 💰
    Best answer: $1M 💰
    12 answers · 1 day ago
  • Is the writer of this text an English native speaker?

    My English teacher asked us to pick a random text (such as comments on newspapers, posts on forums, etc.) and to decide whether the writer of the text is English native speaker, and to give reasons to our decision. I'm picking a part of a random text from Y!A. What do you think, is the writer native? And why?... show more
    My English teacher asked us to pick a random text (such as comments on newspapers, posts on forums, etc.) and to decide whether the writer of the text is English native speaker, and to give reasons to our decision. I'm picking a part of a random text from Y!A. What do you think, is the writer native? And why? Does s/he sound educated/ mature enough (disregarding the content, but rather from the language - is it a high school language, for instance)? I'm hesitating because the English seems a bit unusual (I'm not a native either so I don't really have the feeling). Here it is: --- "It's harder for me to endure the inhospitable attitude of French people, because I previously lived in Germany, and Germans treat foreigners from non-EU countries with respect and friendliness. I still remember my first weeks in Frankfurt vividly, and the number of times I was unable to find my way, holding the city map in my hands, when a German would approach and ask whether I would need his or her assistance. In France, let alone offering help, they avoid me like the plague each time I ask for directions. And I speak French (no less fluent than German). It's just one, most trivial example. French staffs' attitude at the Foreigners' Office is sarcastic at best - a far cry from their counterparts in Germany. I don't condone the animosity displayed by the minority toward native French, but it takes two to tango." --- Thanks! P.S. If the writer is not native, how "bad" is his/ her English?
    12 answers · 4 days ago
  • Will I be in trouble?

    I used the phrase 'den of iniquity' in my English homework, not quite knowing what it meant. My teacher came up to me today, asking me where I'd heard the phrase. I said "My dad uses it to describe my bedroom" (which he does) and she laughed. However, I'm worried about what she thinks of... show more
    I used the phrase 'den of iniquity' in my English homework, not quite knowing what it meant. My teacher came up to me today, asking me where I'd heard the phrase. I said "My dad uses it to describe my bedroom" (which he does) and she laughed. However, I'm worried about what she thinks of me now/ how parents evening is going to go. I've since learned what it meant and am regretting it so much. Does anyone have any advice? I'm thirteen and in year 9 (8th grade) so I don't know if it was maybe acceptable? Who knows. Oh gosh, PLEASE HELP
    14 answers · 2 days ago
  • What is ganggarita?

    8 answers · 3 days ago
  • What does 'beyond' mean in "How are languages beyond one’s primary language learned?"?

    Best answer: outside the limits of something (one’s primary language learned)

    https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/beyond
    Best answer: outside the limits of something (one’s primary language learned)

    https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/beyond
    8 answers · 1 day ago
  • Do you pronounce data as "daytah" or "dahta"?

    Also, where are you from?
    Also, where are you from?
    7 answers · 17 hours ago
  • What is the definition of normal?

    Literally .
    Literally .
    7 answers · 18 hours ago
  • Is there a non-sarcastic sounding way to say "Have a good life?"?

    Best answer: Best wishes for the future
    Best answer: Best wishes for the future
    10 answers · 2 days ago
  • Should my girlfriend call me her "boyfriend" if I'm a man?

    Best answer: It's quite common. But if you want to be more precise, why not ask her to tell people you're her lover and she's your mistress?
    Best answer: It's quite common. But if you want to be more precise, why not ask her to tell people you're her lover and she's your mistress?
    16 answers · 3 days ago
  • What does 'all the way' mean in: "The closest doctor is all the way in Grant Village."?

    Best answer: all the way to (over, in)=as far as. You won't find a doctor until you go at least as far as Grant Village. I would say "all the way over in Grant Village", myself. the "in" part belongs with Grant Village, and not with "all the way". the nearest doctor is in Grant Village,... show more
    Best answer: all the way to (over, in)=as far as. You won't find a doctor until you go at least as far as Grant Village. I would say "all the way over in Grant Village", myself. the "in" part belongs with Grant Village, and not with "all the way". the nearest doctor is in Grant Village, which is all the way over there (waving my arm in that direction).
    6 answers · 11 hours ago
  • Which sentence is correct?

    Best answer: There is a grammatical difference but I can't remember the details. It has to do with whether Richard Roe is performing an action by asking the question, or the question is being acted upon by Richard Roe by being asked by him. B is usually the one you're looking for. In terms of meaning - I think A is... show more
    Best answer: There is a grammatical difference but I can't remember the details. It has to do with whether Richard Roe is performing an action by asking the question, or the question is being acted upon by Richard Roe by being asked by him. B is usually the one you're looking for.

    In terms of meaning
    - I think A is actually telling what Richard Roe said
    - and B is telling what he did

    Edit: However that's being picky, and isn't really necessary to worry about. Both function the same way, and in fact it's useful to have variety so you're not writing the same sentence over and over again. Choose the one you like better.
    8 answers · 2 days ago
  • Two good words for me ..?

    16 answers · 4 days ago