• Bond angles in NH3 and NF3 & VSEPR theory?

    I was trying to figure out if the bond angles in NF3 are larger than in NH3. My reasoning led me to the conclusion that they should be larger, though in reality the opposite is true (102 deg for NF3 and 106 deg for NH3). I can't pinpoint where I am mistaken. Here is my reasoning: According to VSEPR the repulsion for lone pair-bond e... show more
    I was trying to figure out if the bond angles in NF3 are larger than in NH3. My reasoning led me to the conclusion that they should be larger, though in reality the opposite is true (102 deg for NF3 and 106 deg for NH3). I can't pinpoint where I am mistaken. Here is my reasoning: According to VSEPR the repulsion for lone pair-bond e (electrons) is greater than bond e- bond e. Thus the bond angles will be determined by the strength of the lone-pair-bond e repulsion. F is more electronegative, thus it will pull closer to it the bond electrons, reduce the electron cloud density near N, reduce the repulsion lone-pair-bond e, thus decrease the lone pair-bond e angle and increase the bond e- bond e angle. What am I missing?
    3 answers · Chemistry · 1 decade ago
  • PH of 50nM HCl with 2 decimal digits accuracy?

    Please justify your answer/provide the calculations. As a graduate chemist I want to see how many people will get it wrong, so don't worry about cheating with homework ... I am just curious how many people really understand pH.
    Please justify your answer/provide the calculations. As a graduate chemist I want to see how many people will get it wrong, so don't worry about cheating with homework ... I am just curious how many people really understand pH.
    4 answers · Chemistry · 1 decade ago
  • Why do people pick as best answer what they want to hear instead of what is correct?

    In some areas like Philosophy there is no such thing as a "correct" answer. However, when referring to scientific and historical facts, there is...or at least there are definitely wrong answers. I wonder if there is a point in answering questions on this site if people simply go with what they want to hear and if such "distorted"... show more
    In some areas like Philosophy there is no such thing as a "correct" answer. However, when referring to scientific and historical facts, there is...or at least there are definitely wrong answers. I wonder if there is a point in answering questions on this site if people simply go with what they want to hear and if such "distorted" choices will propagate/promote general misconceptions in science, history, etc, especially among students.
    19 answers · Other - Science · 1 decade ago