• What did Christ mean when he said these things?

    The “Sermon on the Mount” (Matthew 5:1-7:29) summarizes the most familiar and important principles of living a just, ethical and moral life espoused by the founder of Christianity, this man we call Jesus Christ. In the sermon, Christ calls upon his followers to, among other things, “love your enemies,” “do good to those who hate you,” “turn the... show more
    The “Sermon on the Mount” (Matthew 5:1-7:29) summarizes the most familiar and important principles of living a just, ethical and moral life espoused by the founder of Christianity, this man we call Jesus Christ. In the sermon, Christ calls upon his followers to, among other things, “love your enemies,” “do good to those who hate you,” “turn the other cheek,” to abandon concerns about where one’s food, shelter and clothing will come from, etc. So important are these principles, in fact, that one’s salvation depends on living a life that reflects them. These are noble and laudable principles; they’re also radical and apparently very difficult for most people to live by. Only a handful of notable people since the time of Christ have actually managed to live their true meaning. So, how is one (especially one who is a Christian) to understand what Christ meant by these exhortations, and to reconcile the gap between the principles and the practice?
    15 answers · Religion & Spirituality · 1 decade ago
  • Is there a difference between thought, feeling and behavior? Are thoughts and feelings by themselves harmless

    The obvious answer to both of these questions is "Yes." And yet, one would not know it from the answers to some questions posted on Y!A. Take this recent Q&A, for instance: http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;_ylt=AtvWFytgfltgBDmiLt9Y8s7ty6IX;_ylv=3?qid=20071226102153AAidZQW&show=7#profile-info-lC3MWfnvaa Now, this is the... show more
    The obvious answer to both of these questions is "Yes." And yet, one would not know it from the answers to some questions posted on Y!A. Take this recent Q&A, for instance: http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;... Now, this is the question I would like answered: Why it is that people seem incapable of making the distinction between thought, feeling and behavior? Oh...one more thing. To be selected as "Best Answer," your response must meet ALL of the following specifications. It must: 1) be cogent and probative, or at least intelligible; 2) be written in complete, grammatically correct English sentences (no abbreviated words, e.g., u, ur, imho, bcuz, etc.); 3) be a direct response to the question I asked; and 4) cite sources you have paraphrased or restated, if applicable. I'm looking forward to hearing from you.
    8 answers · Psychology · 1 decade ago
  • Explain how a tailwind helps an airplane fly faster?

    I’ve been curious about this for a long time and still have not received an explanation I can comprehend. A commercial pilot recently explained to me that a tailwind helps the commercial aircraft fly faster. However, the more I think about this, the less sense it makes. I can see how this would be true if the plane is flying slower than the... show more
    I’ve been curious about this for a long time and still have not received an explanation I can comprehend. A commercial pilot recently explained to me that a tailwind helps the commercial aircraft fly faster. However, the more I think about this, the less sense it makes. I can see how this would be true if the plane is flying slower than the wind is blowing. But a jet liner travels at 500-600 mph at cruising altitude, so even if the wind were at the jet’s tail, it can’t possibly be blowing at or greater than the speed of the jet…can it? This would mean that the jet will be “outrunning” the wind, thereby not benefiting from it. Conversely, if the wind were a headwind, you would expect the drag on the jet to increase and the speed to slow somewhat. Can someone explain this phenomenon in terms that make sense to this non-scientist? Thank you!
    9 answers · Aircraft · 1 decade ago