• DNA insertion mutation consequences? Protein and mRNA length?

    We have a 1000 base pair insertion in some gene. Consequences? The mRNA is longer by 1000 base pairs. 1)The same amount of mRNA is transcribed. Why isn't it more? Protein may be longer or shorter depending on start/stop codons altered. Probably causes non-functional protein. 2) The same amount of protein is translated. Why is it the same amount?
    We have a 1000 base pair insertion in some gene. Consequences? The mRNA is longer by 1000 base pairs. 1)The same amount of mRNA is transcribed. Why isn't it more? Protein may be longer or shorter depending on start/stop codons altered. Probably causes non-functional protein. 2) The same amount of protein is translated. Why is it the same amount?
    1 answer · Biology · 4 months ago
  • Chance of inheriting dominant mutation?

    We have a dominant mutant allele D that is 10 map units from markers 1, 2 and 3. What is the chance that individual A and B will have the disease phenotype?
    We have a dominant mutant allele D that is 10 map units from markers 1, 2 and 3. What is the chance that individual A and B will have the disease phenotype?
    Biology · 4 months ago
  • What are this trihybrid's possible input genotypes?

    I testcross a trihybrid female to a tester male: v/v+ · cv/cv+ · ct/ct+ x v/v · cv/cv · ct/ct "The parental input genotypes for our triple heterozygotes are v+ · cv · ct and v · cv+ · ct+". 1) I don't get how these are the gamete genotypes of our trihybrid? 2) Why can we ignore the tester's alleles? I sort of understand,... show more
    I testcross a trihybrid female to a tester male: v/v+ · cv/cv+ · ct/ct+ x v/v · cv/cv · ct/ct "The parental input genotypes for our triple heterozygotes are v+ · cv · ct and v · cv+ · ct+". 1) I don't get how these are the gamete genotypes of our trihybrid? 2) Why can we ignore the tester's alleles? I sort of understand, because they are not dominant? 3) Did it matter that the tester is a male? Probably not?
    Biology · 4 months ago
  • Gene linkage, find genotype/phenotype of parents given progeny?

    A plant has 3 genes? that control colour. P purple > p1 light purple > p white. The number of leaves is controlled by 2 genes? F five leafs > f four leafs I cross a purple leaf with five leafs to white flower with four leafs. F1 Progeny: 35 purple and five leafs 36 light purple and five leafs. 1) What is the genotype of the parents... show more
    A plant has 3 genes? that control colour. P purple > p1 light purple > p white. The number of leaves is controlled by 2 genes? F five leafs > f four leafs I cross a purple leaf with five leafs to white flower with four leafs. F1 Progeny: 35 purple and five leafs 36 light purple and five leafs. 1) What is the genotype of the parents crossed? I just had this on a test, hopefully I have all the information! I guessed the parents :( The dot means we don't know if genes are linked. My punnet square for the hypothesized parent genotype: P/p1 ⋅ F/F x p/p ⋅ f/f .........P ⋅ F...........P ⋅ F...........p1 ⋅ F............p1 ⋅ F p ⋅ f...P/p ⋅ F/f......P/p ⋅ F/f......p1/p ⋅ F/f......p1/p ⋅ F/f Hope the above is understandable! Progeny is 1/4 for all: P/p ⋅ F/f P/p ⋅ F/f p1/p ⋅ F/f p1/p ⋅ F/f So half are Purple with five leafs Other half are light purple with five leafs! Parents must be: P/p1 ⋅ F/F and p/p ⋅ f/f?
    1 answer · Biology · 5 months ago
  • What is this question asking? Critical points of multi variable functions?

    I'm just struggling with understanding what the question is asking? O.o I know about critical points existing when the gradient (all derivatives are zero) is 0. I just don't understand what the question even wants lol.
    I'm just struggling with understanding what the question is asking? O.o I know about critical points existing when the gradient (all derivatives are zero) is 0. I just don't understand what the question even wants lol.
    2 answers · Mathematics · 6 months ago
  • Polar coordinates, interval of integration?

    1) Why is the interval of integration for dθ from just 0 to π? It interval kinda looks like it's from -π/4 to π/4. So I can see the "duration" of the integral is π radians also. So... 2) Why does it not matter where we start our integration? What am I missing?
    1) Why is the interval of integration for dθ from just 0 to π? It interval kinda looks like it's from -π/4 to π/4. So I can see the "duration" of the integral is π radians also. So... 2) Why does it not matter where we start our integration? What am I missing?
    2 answers · Mathematics · 6 months ago
  • Explain multivariable differentiability definition?

    For z = f(x, y), the total differential of z is dz = fₓdx + fᵧdy, by definition. So I understand the above sort of. At least I can read it. I cannot understand the next definition for multivariable differentiability o.O I don't think any can! It looks like gibberish to me!
    For z = f(x, y), the total differential of z is dz = fₓdx + fᵧdy, by definition. So I understand the above sort of. At least I can read it. I cannot understand the next definition for multivariable differentiability o.O I don't think any can! It looks like gibberish to me!
    1 answer · Mathematics · 6 months ago
  • Magnitude of magnetic field from current carrying wire?

    For point 1, the magnetic field due to the horizontal wire and diagonal wire add up. The answer I get is C. (μ₀×I) / (πd) This is correct. 1) For point 2, I'm not sure how to find the magnitude of the magnetic field due to the diagonal wire? The answer is F apparently. 2) Why did we not have to account for the angle for point 1, but now it... show more
    For point 1, the magnetic field due to the horizontal wire and diagonal wire add up. The answer I get is C. (μ₀×I) / (πd) This is correct. 1) For point 2, I'm not sure how to find the magnitude of the magnetic field due to the diagonal wire? The answer is F apparently. 2) Why did we not have to account for the angle for point 1, but now it matters for point 2? Because the horizontal wire is in between?
    1 answer · Physics · 6 months ago
  • What is ionizing radiation?

    Nuclear radiation energy is much larger than visible light energies. So instead of just being absorbed and increasing an objects temperature, nuclear radiation ionizes matter and breaks molecular bonds. Explanation was because: "These energies are much larger than ionization energies of atoms and molecules". "The ionization energies... show more
    Nuclear radiation energy is much larger than visible light energies. So instead of just being absorbed and increasing an objects temperature, nuclear radiation ionizes matter and breaks molecular bonds. Explanation was because: "These energies are much larger than ionization energies of atoms and molecules". "The ionization energies of an atom is about 10 eV, while alpha or beta particles are around 1 MeV". How does an atom's ionization energy and ionizing radiation fight? Atom ionization energy is energy needed to rid of an electron. Nuclear radiation just damages everything. I don't see how they connect?
    1 answer · Physics · 6 months ago
  • Why is induced electric field non-conservative?

    To paraphrase my textbook: Usually a 'Coulomb electric field' starts at a positive charge and ends at a negative charge. A 'Non-Coulomb electric field' such as an induced electric field caused by changing magnetic field is non-conservative. I'm not sure what or why this is? The explanation was: "There's never any... show more
    To paraphrase my textbook: Usually a 'Coulomb electric field' starts at a positive charge and ends at a negative charge. A 'Non-Coulomb electric field' such as an induced electric field caused by changing magnetic field is non-conservative. I'm not sure what or why this is? The explanation was: "There's never any negative work to balance positive work so net work done in a closed path is not zero". I still don't understand :(
    3 answers · Physics · 6 months ago
  • Induced current direction, eddy currents?

    We have an electric rail car. To brake, we flick on a magnetic field (x) in the page. Thus this increase into the page must be opposed by an induced magnetic field out of the page (.) which mean induced current is counter clockwise I believe. Which image best represents this? I picked C but that's incorrect. The hint was then: consider both... show more
    We have an electric rail car. To brake, we flick on a magnetic field (x) in the page. Thus this increase into the page must be opposed by an induced magnetic field out of the page (.) which mean induced current is counter clockwise I believe. Which image best represents this? I picked C but that's incorrect. The hint was then: consider both leading and trailing edges.
    1 answer · Physics · 6 months ago
  • Direction of conducting loop, if we increase magnetic field strength?

    A stationary loop has a magnetic field through it. We increase the magnetic field strength into the page (X). What happens to the loop? The answer: The loop is pushed to the right, out of the magnetic field. Why? I can see the the magnetic force up and down cancel out. Don't the magnetic forces left and right also cancel out then?
    A stationary loop has a magnetic field through it. We increase the magnetic field strength into the page (X). What happens to the loop? The answer: The loop is pushed to the right, out of the magnetic field. Why? I can see the the magnetic force up and down cancel out. Don't the magnetic forces left and right also cancel out then?
    1 answer · Physics · 6 months ago
  • Same direction/like current carrying wires attract?

    I know opposite magnetic fields attract. So the top pair of wires with current both coming out of the page, there is an attractive force exerted between them. However I'm getting confused with magnetic force. By the right hand rule: Top left wire: Your thumb is coming out of the page: current Your index finger points up in direction of B:... show more
    I know opposite magnetic fields attract. So the top pair of wires with current both coming out of the page, there is an attractive force exerted between them. However I'm getting confused with magnetic force. By the right hand rule: Top left wire: Your thumb is coming out of the page: current Your index finger points up in direction of B: magnetic field. Then your middle finger is pointing left: magnetic force Top right wire: Your thumb is coming out of the page: current Your index finger points down in direction of B: magnetic field. Then your middle finger is pointing right: magnetic force So the two magnetic forces are away from each other aren't they??
    1 answer · Physics · 6 months ago
  • Find the current induced in loop moving through magnetic field?

    Find the maximum induced current? Voltage = the negative change in magnetic flux over change in time: V = -dΦ / dt magnetic flux = magnetic field multiplied by area Φ = BA. Then: V = -dBA / dt Our magnetic field, B, is constant. Then: V = -BdA / dt Maximum current occurs when the diamond is halfway in. The trouble I have is expressing this area in... show more
    Find the maximum induced current? Voltage = the negative change in magnetic flux over change in time: V = -dΦ / dt magnetic flux = magnetic field multiplied by area Φ = BA. Then: V = -dBA / dt Our magnetic field, B, is constant. Then: V = -BdA / dt Maximum current occurs when the diamond is halfway in. The trouble I have is expressing this area in terms of L and x. Then the position derivative dx/dt is just velocity. The answer is: V = -BLv = -(0.80)(0.1414m)(10m/s) = 1.13V. Then I = V/R = 1.13V / 0.10Ω = 11.3A. 1) How do we go from V = -BdA / dt to V = -BLv ?? I'm having trouble seeing how dA / dt becomes Lv.
    1 answer · Physics · 6 months ago
  • How do you find the limits of integration? Triple Integral?

    Find the limits of integration for ∫∫∫ dx dz dy for region bounded by: In the first octant paraboloid y = x² + 5z² y = 4 y = 10 1) How do you generally approach these problems? I had always drawn out double integrals, but with triple integrals its not so convenient. I don't have any system or method now. So far I have ∫[4,10]∫[0,?]∫[0,?] dx dz dy
    Find the limits of integration for ∫∫∫ dx dz dy for region bounded by: In the first octant paraboloid y = x² + 5z² y = 4 y = 10 1) How do you generally approach these problems? I had always drawn out double integrals, but with triple integrals its not so convenient. I don't have any system or method now. So far I have ∫[4,10]∫[0,?]∫[0,?] dx dz dy
    3 answers · Mathematics · 6 months ago
  • Faraday's Law, Find Induced Current?

    A square loop moves through a magnetic field as in the picture. 1) What is the maximum current induced in the loop? Man I really cannot solve this for the life of me :( Relevant equations: Voltage = change in magnetic flux / change in time V = -dΦ / dt = -dBAcosθ / dt I barely even understand the equation :(
    A square loop moves through a magnetic field as in the picture. 1) What is the maximum current induced in the loop? Man I really cannot solve this for the life of me :( Relevant equations: Voltage = change in magnetic flux / change in time V = -dΦ / dt = -dBAcosθ / dt I barely even understand the equation :(
    2 answers · Physics · 6 months ago
  • Calculate the magnetic flux through loop, around solenoid?

    A 1.8cm diameter solenoid passing through the center of 7.0cm diameter loop. The magnetic field inside the solenoid is 0.16T. When the flux through the loop and the solenoid's area vector are parallel (Top) I calculated magnetic flux Φ = 4.1E-5, which was correct. 1) What is being represented in the image?? A loop is puncturing the side of a... show more
    A 1.8cm diameter solenoid passing through the center of 7.0cm diameter loop. The magnetic field inside the solenoid is 0.16T. When the flux through the loop and the solenoid's area vector are parallel (Top) I calculated magnetic flux Φ = 4.1E-5, which was correct. 1) What is being represented in the image?? A loop is puncturing the side of a solenoid?? I don't really understand the picture lol 2) What is the magnetic flux through the loop when tilted 60 degrees?
    1 answer · Physics · 7 months ago
  • What is the ratio of the resistors?

    I have two resistors R₁ and R₂. R₂ > R₁. The resistors are connected to a voltage source V₀ When the resistors are connected in series the current is Iₛ When in parallel, the current Iₚ from the source is equal to 10Iₛ 1) Why do we only consider the smaller root to the quadratic equation ? I got to: The voltage can be expressed in two ways... show more
    I have two resistors R₁ and R₂. R₂ > R₁. The resistors are connected to a voltage source V₀ When the resistors are connected in series the current is Iₛ When in parallel, the current Iₚ from the source is equal to 10Iₛ 1) Why do we only consider the smaller root to the quadratic equation ? I got to: The voltage can be expressed in two ways V₀ = Iₛ (R₁ + R₂) V₀ = Iₚ (R₁R₂ / (R₁ + R₂)) Substituting in R₁ = rR₂, and solving the above for r: R₂² (8r - r² - 1) = 0 We use the quadratic formula to solve for r And r = 7.873 or 0.127. ∴ r = 0.127. The answer is r = 0.127. But why not 7.871?
    1 answer · Physics · 7 months ago
  • Which magnet is more representative of Earth’s magnetic field?

    Which magnet is more representative of Earth’s magnetic field? So the answer is ∴A, but could I get an explanation? My homework just tells me I was incorrect for choosing B :( I know the north pole generally is considered up in the arctic. The south pole is down in the antarctic. And opposite magnetic poles attract. So the south end of a magnet... show more
    Which magnet is more representative of Earth’s magnetic field? So the answer is ∴A, but could I get an explanation? My homework just tells me I was incorrect for choosing B :( I know the north pole generally is considered up in the arctic. The south pole is down in the antarctic. And opposite magnetic poles attract. So the south end of a magnet would point up as in magnet A. But don't compasses have it the other way, B?
    3 answers · Physics · 7 months ago