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  • Native English speakers: Do native speakers use "go-to travel"?

    You may have heard the Japanese made English expression used under the corona chaos, "go-to travel," and I thought this is incorrect, and no native English speakers would use it. 

    I also asked some native speakers, and they all said, "go-to travel" sounds weird or awkward. However, someone told me that he found the expression in the Wisdom English-Japanese dictionary, and I found out the expression is in the dictionary without an example sentence. A) is a sentence that is found in COCA. Does (A) sound natural to your ears? How about (B) and (C)?

    (A) I never go to travel without this stuff.

    (B) I never travel without this stuff.

    (C) I never go traveling without this stuff.

    Thank you. I'd appreciate your feedback.

    3 AnswersLanguages4 days ago
  • Native English speakers: ?

    Which construction do you hear people say most frequently? Do you feel any difference in meaning or situations between these three?  

    A) I had my wallet stolen on the train.

    B) Someone stole my wallet on the train.

    C) My wallet was stolen on the train.

    I think B) is most natural. If the topic of the conversation is my wallet, C,) is used. If you want to focus on the situation you're in, A) is used.

    Thank you. I'd appreciate your feedback.

    3 AnswersLanguages2 weeks ago
  • Native English speakers:?

    In the business email to let someone know that the person is promoted, which one do you think is appropriate?

    A) This is to certify that you have been promoted to the sales manager.B) This is to certify that you are promoted to the sales manager.

    1 AnswerLanguages3 weeks ago
  • Native English speakers or master users of English: Is "listen to radio" correct?

    We usually learn that "listen to the radio" is correct, but I found 77 examples of "listen to radio" in the COCA search. In most cases, another expression follows "radio," but no expression follows it in some examples. Do you feel (2) is also correct? Do you feel any difference in meaning between (1) and (2)?

    (1) I listen to the radio while driving.

    (2) I listen to radio while driving.

    Thank you. I'd appreciate your feedback.

    2 AnswersLanguages4 weeks ago
  • Native English speakers: What does "the hospital" refer to?

    When you hear someone say (1), what do you understand "the hospital" refers to? The knowledge you have about what a hospital is? OR A specific hospital both you and the person you're talking to can identify?

    (1) I went to the hospital to see my father as he had an operation yesterday.

    How about (2)? What post office does "the post office" refer to?

    (2) I used to work at the post office.

    The knowledge you have about what a post office is? OR A specific post office both you and the person you're talking to can identify?

    How does the meaning change if "a" is used instead of "the"?

    (3)  I went to a hospital to see my father as he had an operation yesterday. 

    (4)  I used to work at a post office.

    Thank you. I'd appreciate your feedback.

    2 AnswersLanguages4 weeks ago
  • Native English speakers: Is "I'm 23 tomorrow" okay?

    I think (a) is usually used, but (b) sounds awkward. What do you think? Is (b) also okay?

    (a) Tomorrow is my birthday. I'll be 23 tomorrow.

    (b) Tomorrow is my birthday. I'm 23 tomorrow.

    If both are okay, do you feel any difference between them?

    Thank you. I'd appreciate your feedback.

    3 AnswersLanguages1 month ago
  • Native English speakers: Is it possible to say "I should have come TOMORROW"? ?

    Imagine a situation in which you come to the orthopedist for physiotherapy and find out that the physiotherapist you want to take care of you is not there today. Another therapist tells you that she will be here tomorrow. In this situation, could you say (1), (2), or (3) below?

    (1) I should have come tomorrow.(2) I should have decided/chosen to come tomorrow. (3) I shouldn't have come today.

    I think (1) sounds awkward and (2) and (3) are okay. What would you say in this situation?

    3 AnswersLanguages1 month ago
  • Native English speakers: IN or INTO? AT or IN? Are both okay in the next context?

    Which sounds natural to your ears? Are both okay?

    (1) a. I put money in the post office.

         b. I put money at the post office.

    (2) a. I can't put my feelings into words.

         b. I can't put my feelings in words.

    (3) a. Put these eyedrops into your eyes.

          b. Put these eyedrops in your eyes.

    Thank you. I'd appreciate your feedback.

    3 AnswersLanguages1 month ago
  • Native English speakers: the difference between "Not in service" and "Out of service."?

    Regarding a sign in front of the train, there are two similar expressions. What is the difference between these two?

    (a) Not in service.

    (b) Out of service.

    If you don't mind, would you share with me where you are from and how old you are?

    Thank you. I'd appreciate your feedback.

    Languages2 months ago
  • Native English speakers: always think and be always thinking?

    Do you feel any difference between these two? If so, would you be specific about the difference?

    a) I always think about you.

    b) I'm always thinking about you.

    If you don't mind, would you also share with me where you are from and how old you are?

    Thank you. I'd appreciate your feedback.

    4 AnswersLanguages2 months ago
  • Native English speakers: his tea and their tea?

    Do you feel any difference between these two?

    (a) Everyone is having his/her tea.

    (b) Everyone is having their tea.

    Dennis Keene writes in his book that he feels the difference. In (a), he feels that isolated people are having tea separately. In (b), a group of people is having tea together, chatting. Do you agree with his idea?

    9 AnswersLanguages2 months ago
  • Native English speakers: children in car/children in the car?

    I sometimes see a sign that says "children in car" or "children in the car." Both signs tell other drivers to be careful of driving since a child or children are in the car. Are both okay? If so, are there any differences in meaning between them? Does either one sound awkward?

    Thank you. I'd appreciate your feedback.

    4 AnswersLanguages2 months ago
  • Native English speakers: This shop has an ATM. / There is an ATM in this shop.?

    In each pair of sentences, which one sounds natural to your ears? Or which is commonly used?

    If both are okay, do you feel any difference between them?

    1 a. This shop has an ATM

       b. There is an ATM in this shop.

    2. a. This neighborhood doesn't have a post office.

        b. There are no post offices in this neighborhood.

    2 AnswersLanguages3 months ago
  • Native English speakers: Which one do you usually say, Band-Aid, adhesive tape, or plaster?

    Which one do you usually say?

    (a) Can I have a Band-Aid?

    (b) Can I have an adhesive tape?

    (c) Can I have a plaster?

    Thank you. I'd appreciate your feedback.

    11 AnswersLanguages3 months ago
  • Native English speakers: the difference between "Do you mind if ..." and "Do you mind my doing"?

    Do you feel any difference between these three sentences in (1) and (2)?

    (1) a. Do you mind if I open the window?

         b. Do you mind my opening the window?

         c. Do you mind me opening the window?

    (2) a. Do you mind if I smoke?

         b. Do you mind my smoking?

         c. Do you mind me smoking?

    My understanding is that technically speaking, there are differences but in most cases, they can be used interchangeably and the context helps to decide the meaning.

    Technically speaking, (1a) is used when you ask for permission to open the window, while (1b) and (1c) are used when you have already started to open the window while asking for permission. I'm not sure whether there is a difference between (1b) and (1c). If there is, I'd like to know about it.

    Regarding (2), all sentences can be used when you ask for permission to smoke, but (2b) and (2c) also mean do you mind the fact that I have a habit of smoking?

    What do you think?

    Thank you. I'd appreciate your feedback.

    2 AnswersLanguages4 months ago
  • Native English speaker: Is "So long" used instead of "See you" as a daily greeting?

    Someone asked me a question. While she was watching a TV show, she heard a waitress at a cafe say to a customer, "So long" when the customer was leaving the cafe.

    Do native speakers use "So long" as one of the alternatives of "see you"?

    I think "so long" is used when you can't see the person forever as the person is moving to a place far away.

    6 AnswersLanguages4 months ago
  • Native English speakers: Can "would be 85" be used instead of "would have been 85" in this sentence?

    (1) My father-in-law passed away Saturday evening and his funeral was today - very hard. He was 84 and would have been 85 next month. 

    A student asked me whether "would be 85" can be used instead of "would have been 85" because "would be" is used when we talk about something opposite from the reality now. I don't think "would be 84" is used when we talk about someone who passed away. 

    What do you think?

    How about this case? Can "would be" be used?

    (2) If he were still alive, he would join us.

    Thank you. I'd appreciate your feedback.

    2 AnswersLanguages4 months ago
  • Native English speakers: When you hear someone knocking on the door and you think Maria is behind the door, which one would you say?

    Are all these expressions okay?

    What's the difference?

    (a) That's Maria.

    (b) That will be Maria.

    (c) That would be Maria.

    1 AnswerLanguages5 months ago
  • Native English speakers: What is the difference between "to" and "for" in this sentence?

    What's the difference in meaning between "necessary to me" and "necessary for me" in this sentence?

    That sort of information seems necessary to me -- not for me, but for it.

    Languages5 months ago