• Should I just give up on writing? Read description!!?

    You have potential with your descriptions compared to a lot of creative writing students. Work hard and develop a fan base, and you might make some money on it. Depends on how well connected / hard-working / and sociable you are. I have tried publishing on CreateSpace and Kindle via CreateSpace, and it is possible to make hundreds of dollars if... show more
    You have potential with your descriptions compared to a lot of creative writing students. Work hard and develop a fan base, and you might make some money on it. Depends on how well connected / hard-working / and sociable you are. I have tried publishing on CreateSpace and Kindle via CreateSpace, and it is possible to make hundreds of dollars if you have name recognition and good content (and the right software for publishing).
    17 answers · Books & Authors · 1 year ago
  • What is the greatest philosophy?

    If you're not afraid, you could go to the database of real philosophy quotations at: http://www.philosophyideas.com Academic philosophy has become divided from religious philosophy. Religious philosophers or mystics are fond of highly idiosyncratic messages that happen to fit into their elaborate spiritual traditions. Often these mystics... show more
    If you're not afraid, you could go to the database of real philosophy quotations at: http://www.philosophyideas.com Academic philosophy has become divided from religious philosophy. Religious philosophers or mystics are fond of highly idiosyncratic messages that happen to fit into their elaborate spiritual traditions. Often these mystics require 'faith' on the part of the adherent. This is fairly the opposite of what academic philosophy requires. You can do science if you like torturing animals, but largely there is a choice between some kind of elaborate self-development, and the kind of critical discipline that might lead to your own logical or metaphysical system. Accepting it yourself is a large part of the battle, and for that reason the greatest philosophy must always be your own.
    22 answers · Philosophy · 1 year ago
  • I need a good book to read. Recommend anything.?

    If you like genius content that can still be interpreted with knowledge of English, then I recommend: *The Golden Notebook by Nathan Coppedge (includes creative interpretation of quotes by several great thinkers who had golden ideas. For example, Lichtenberg, Novalis, Locke, Kant, and Protagoras. And some quotes from me). The book was based on... show more
    If you like genius content that can still be interpreted with knowledge of English, then I recommend: *The Golden Notebook by Nathan Coppedge (includes creative interpretation of quotes by several great thinkers who had golden ideas. For example, Lichtenberg, Novalis, Locke, Kant, and Protagoras. And some quotes from me). The book was based on other collections of aphorisms in English: *The Waste Books by Lichtenberg. *The Philosophical Writings of Novalis. *Fragments of Protagoras from Ancient Greek Philosophy Reader. I also draw on The Oxford Book of Aphorisms, and Elias Canetti s work The Secret Heart of the Clock. One of the better fiction books in history is Invisible Cities by Italo Calvino. And if you can tolerate a little grit, Ellison s The Invisible Man is one of the better writings in English. If you want to read the Bible, I recommend Ecclesiastes ("There is nothing new under the sun"), and the Proverbs of Solomon.
    43 answers · Books & Authors · 1 year ago
  • What does Kant say about war? Also if killing someone is immoral does that make war immoral?

    I own a book called "Kant's Political Writings" and it clarifies this issue. Kant sees politics as largely a matter of nature. Improving politics means improving nature. Confusingly, Kant believes in a kind of 'adventure plan' laid out by the nature of the universe. Interpreting Kant might benefit by thinking of some of his... show more
    I own a book called "Kant's Political Writings" and it clarifies this issue. Kant sees politics as largely a matter of nature. Improving politics means improving nature. Confusingly, Kant believes in a kind of 'adventure plan' laid out by the nature of the universe. Interpreting Kant might benefit by thinking of some of his ideas as media concepts. However, importantly, Kant thinks the adventure is a moral one, designed for the improvement of each individual being. The religious way is the good way, even though, for someone else, the way might be an immoral way, which would come with punishment. Much like many of the thinkers before the 1950's, there is in his thought an epic struggle between good and evil. Kant thinks its possible to be evil, but, being a moralist, he doesn't think evil is better---he thinks it's worse. His conclusion seems to be that law always punishes the evil-doers, so there is no rational desire involving evil. As for illegal substances, like drugs, Kant seems to believe they lead to false beliefs, and deceptions, much like someone who willingly cuts off their leg, because of a delusion. Kant thinks these things are undesirable, because they lead to a lack of personal autonomy, which is necessary for the good life. All in all, war is a complicated question. Kant may think that war emerges from the mind of god---that it is an emotional, un-feeling, unconscious thing---or he may think that it is a symptom of poor thinking in the human mind. There is no doubt, then, that he thinks war is a sin----for it is the very worst thing imaginable.
    8 answers · Philosophy · 2 years ago
  • Who is the greatest philosopher of all time?

    Ignoring Christ, Buddha, Krishna, and various yogis and mathematicians, we might get something like the following, if we look for Western core ideas: Socrates or Plato --- have claims to inventing the concept of ideas. Critical thinking and political ideas. Heraclitus --- contributed to the concept of Time and Reality. Few of his writings... show more
    Ignoring Christ, Buddha, Krishna, and various yogis and mathematicians, we might get something like the following, if we look for Western core ideas: Socrates or Plato --- have claims to inventing the concept of ideas. Critical thinking and political ideas. Heraclitus --- contributed to the concept of Time and Reality. Few of his writings remain. Aristotle --- was called 'The Philosopher'. Invented causal reasoning and possibly the Christian God with Plato. Protagoras --- invented the concept that all things could be true. That there is an argument on every subject. That man is the measure of all things. Nathan Coppedge --- absolute knowledge (categorical deductions), solution to all paradoxes (paroxysm).
    11 answers · Philosophy · 2 years ago
  • How Can I put myself in other person's shoes and make sure my questioning and reasoning of it was accurate?

    If that person agrees with you. Otherwise, if the person is a fiction, there is no way to be right!
    If that person agrees with you. Otherwise, if the person is a fiction, there is no way to be right!
    5 answers · Philosophy · 2 years ago
  • The Ten Good Habits everyone should try to have?

    An effort to cover everything in ten points (pretty difficult): 1. Optimism (a practical choice). 2. Ethical conduct (because of the golden rule). 3. Diligence (a way to earn rewards). 4. Kindness (a way to earn karma points). 5. Having practical knowledge (concerning one's own life). 6. Political responsibility (at least in a democratic... show more
    An effort to cover everything in ten points (pretty difficult): 1. Optimism (a practical choice). 2. Ethical conduct (because of the golden rule). 3. Diligence (a way to earn rewards). 4. Kindness (a way to earn karma points). 5. Having practical knowledge (concerning one's own life). 6. Political responsibility (at least in a democratic society). 7. Seeking happiness (for self-benefit). 8. Concern for human values like meaning, hope, and tolerance. 9. Creativity (to remain mentally flexible). 10. Being open to change (immortal value). I think this is a pretty good selection!
    31 answers · Other - Social Science · 2 years ago
  • When will my book come?

    Within 1 year, usually, with pre-order books. But check the release date. It may be longer than a year, but not usually. Expect an e-mail from Amazon.
    Within 1 year, usually, with pre-order books. But check the release date. It may be longer than a year, but not usually. Expect an e-mail from Amazon.
    5 answers · Books & Authors · 2 years ago
  • What is the Next Level?

    I have thought about the metaphysics of levels, developed in an un-published work titled 17 Great Systemic Works. Each of the seventeen levels is represented by a diagram. One of the later diagrams is titled "Level 2". And looks like the attached diagram. The point is, life has symbolic levels, and the more life integrates with... show more
    I have thought about the metaphysics of levels, developed in an un-published work titled 17 Great Systemic Works. Each of the seventeen levels is represented by a diagram. One of the later diagrams is titled "Level 2". And looks like the attached diagram. The point is, life has symbolic levels, and the more life integrates with symbolism, the easier it is to convince yourself that you've traveled far in spirituality, philosophy, intelligence, and skill.
    10 answers · Philosophy · 2 years ago
  • How can I expand mindfulness?

    Consider phrases like the following: "How to count the steps along the path, when the path is One?" "The mind is the mediator of the world" "Then the center, follows from the first two fields of the mind, internal, and middle..." "Close your eyes! And fill your mind with the world around you!..." Even if... show more
    Consider phrases like the following: "How to count the steps along the path, when the path is One?" "The mind is the mediator of the world" "Then the center, follows from the first two fields of the mind, internal, and middle..." "Close your eyes! And fill your mind with the world around you!..." Even if these phrases don't make sense at first, they are highly mind-expanding. Otherwise, you can try drinking more caffeine and chocolate milk, and use techniques to awaken lucid dreaming, like owning a lapis lazuli, putting water to cool your chest before bed (seriously, I've heard this works for dreams!), or writing a dream journal. Dreams can then be used in everyday life, as the psychic mind expands, everyday events will seem more psychic, and can then be connected with any intellectual or emotional work you are doing. The effect is that it becomes more meaningful. Books like The Artist's Way, What Color is Your Parachute, and The 5 Faces of Genius contain interesting quotations that can be used to think about what matters, what is important, and what you want to achieve in life. I also recommend Elias Canetti's books of quotations called The Secret Heart of the Clock (he won a Nobel Prize posthumously), and Lichtenberg's deceptively-named The Waste Books, which contains some of the best Western aphorisms. You will be surprised with how intellectually or emotionally oriented mind-expansion can be. Sometimes it depends on specific words to make that significant progress. Otherwise, there are also significant books on Buddhism and magic, such as The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, which I recommend.
    18 answers · Philosophy · 2 years ago
  • What part of the brain controls writing?

    Many of the higher functions, such as emotional reasoning, are located in the frontal lobe. However, memory and intuition may belong to the cerebrum. It may be effective to realize that the brain is only as functional as our associations for its meaning. In other words, just 'knowing' what is supposed to work for highly functional people is... show more
    Many of the higher functions, such as emotional reasoning, are located in the frontal lobe. However, memory and intuition may belong to the cerebrum. It may be effective to realize that the brain is only as functional as our associations for its meaning. In other words, just 'knowing' what is supposed to work for highly functional people is not necessarily enough to make it work for individual writers. Identifying your own strengths and weaknesses is an important part of the process. What if for, example, (as I may have discovered recently about myself, possibly?) you have a much larger right brain than left brain? Or what if the back of your brain is more complex than the front of your brain? Or, what if individual areas in your brain function well, but without connectivity between the hemispheres? Or what if you're completely intelligent, but at the same time utterly insane? All kinds of things can go wrong (or right) with the brain. In general, the three types of brain are analogized to the lizard, the simian, and the human. You want to think about what kinds of foods you can eat to improve your brain, such as fish skin and carbohydrates and leafy greens, and if there's any time where a particular area may have taken damage, that could suggest you focus on other strengths, or practice skills to help you recover. The "human" brain is the frontal lobe (higher functions) The simian brain is the cerebrum (instinct, memory, intuition) The primitive brain is the cerebellum, below the cerebrum (balance, scale, fear, etc.) In addition, several other specialized areas such as the amagdala and Broca's Area are responsible for specifically human memory and multi-lingualism. So, if you want high quality writing, it's about the frontal lobe. If you want narrative fiction and animal instincts, then its about the cerebrum. If you want basic understanding of fear, then that's probably the cerebellum or amagdala combined with other things. But, there is not necessarily a lot known about these areas until very recently. Scientists are still making guesses about the exact function of particular areas of the brain. Brains may even function very differently from person to person. But generally, a more complex, convoluted brain is smarter, and size only matters if it involves a relatively larger number of corruvulations. And the development of specific areas still matters too.
    3 answers · Books & Authors · 2 years ago
  • How are mathematics, statistics, and computing related to philosophy?

    Best answer: Mathematics is a development of logic. Logic is a discipline of philosophy. Individual branches of science including to a small extent computer science, and to an even lesser extent statistics, are the occupations of some of the obscure branches of applied philosophy, which is not 'real' philosophy, but the application of... show more
    Best answer: Mathematics is a development of logic. Logic is a discipline of philosophy. Individual branches of science including to a small extent computer science, and to an even lesser extent statistics, are the occupations of some of the obscure branches of applied philosophy, which is not 'real' philosophy, but the application of concepts from philosophy to other disciplines. Applied philosophy might be touched on by a philosopher, or by someone wishing to provide a background for their work in science, often introductory science. Philosophy has been plagued by some of the problems native to mathematics through its relation to logical set theory, which is sometimes construed to have implications for metaphysics through the many-worlds theory of David K. Lewis and others. Essentially there is no one-to-one correlation, becasue once you are doing philosophy, you are doing philosophy. But not every philosopher is a scientist, so there are a wide number of variations, mostly hinging on the application of logic and ethics. And ethics is always an applied field outside of philosophy.
    12 answers · Philosophy · 2 years ago
  • Are there deep levels of reality?

    Perhaps not here, but somewhere! However, it may have to be simulated before it becomes real for us. As for sources of deepness, there are undoubtedly examples of higher intellect which could be used to format a more meaningful reality than this one, by adapting to the preferences of each 'user'. The problem is, as we are found in nature... show more
    Perhaps not here, but somewhere! However, it may have to be simulated before it becomes real for us. As for sources of deepness, there are undoubtedly examples of higher intellect which could be used to format a more meaningful reality than this one, by adapting to the preferences of each 'user'. The problem is, as we are found in nature we are competitive creatures who need to have high social status before we really know how to enjoy ourselves. And even status comes with some pitfalls, such as sometimes depression or disillusionment. Overcoming the basic problems has been the aspiration of most major spiritual leaders since ancient times. This shows that even spiritual teachers face suffering and difficulties that more ordinary people also cope with. There is a question of whether escaping ordinary life is realistic, and whether returning to real life from the spiritual realm can be considered rational. True spiritual enlightenment has a reputation for accepting the simplicity of life, almost like returning to childhood with a higher-minded mentality. Accepting life's struggles with indifference. In the face of all the human evils, the question of a larger, deeper life is a dangerous one. The sublime has a reputation for temptation and decay. Love itself may be a corrupting force. So, if we must seek the complex and the extraordinary, we should seek it within the superficial and the harmless: the Asceticurean mentality, reflected in many religious traditions. Yet, this teaching accepts that pleasure is possible, and that basic indulgences are not punishable. The key problem is simply not knowing the wisdom of childhood. Choosing to venture in the dark forest. In reality, much good can be had without temptation. Without infinite ambition. Without great pleasures. But, within this mentality, the artistic objects of life become exaggerated. The emotional life is allowed to grow around the apparent difficulties of the world. A kind of transcendence is possible. Maybe the world will even change to meet our fundamental aesthetic desires. The Spiritual Writings by Nathan Coppedge: http://www.amazon.com/Spiritual-Writings...
    42 answers · Philosophy · 2 years ago
  • In what ways can precision be a barrier to philosophy?

    Best answer: In writing The Dimensional Philosopher's Toolkit (different from Baggini and Fosl's The Philosopher's Toolkit), I considered precision (subjects, specifications) to be part of the logical vocabulary. And so, too, was generality (coherence, universalism). The risk with precision is in adopting such a narrow view that the... show more
    Best answer: In writing The Dimensional Philosopher's Toolkit (different from Baggini and Fosl's The Philosopher's Toolkit), I considered precision (subjects, specifications) to be part of the logical vocabulary. And so, too, was generality (coherence, universalism). The risk with precision is in adopting such a narrow view that the larger picture is forgotten. Closed off for too long, entire avenues of inquiry might shrivel and die. With generality (coherency, universalism), on the other hand, one is free to be metaphorical and pursue whatever is important. But there is also a risk with generality of having blindness to what one is actually saying, or whether one actually means it. I have observed that often happens in theology. So, I would say that it is a kind of two-edged sword. But you can't really do without either of them. Precision defines the substance or qualities of philosophy, whereas generality defines its nature and importance.
    9 answers · Philosophy · 2 years ago
  • What is the Life of Meaning?

    What is meaning? How can I achieve it? Instead of sounding like a typical guru, I will give you a wealth of materials I have used in my own pursuit of meaning. My sincerest attempts at my own personal meaning. Learn from it what you will. Meaning comes in many forms, such as practical, existential, poetic, philosophical, metaphysical, and... show more
    What is meaning? How can I achieve it? Instead of sounding like a typical guru, I will give you a wealth of materials I have used in my own pursuit of meaning. My sincerest attempts at my own personal meaning. Learn from it what you will. Meaning comes in many forms, such as practical, existential, poetic, philosophical, metaphysical, and psychological. People have found meaning through writing or keeping a journal or diary, through experiences of nature, education, and even sexuality. The form of meaning I have found is called Asceticureanism or also Aestheticureanism, which is the pursuit of simple aesthetic practices, such as swinging a coin on a string. I will include here some writings on Asceticureanism and related materials. Remember, if you don't find enjoyment, you may need something purposeful to do. You can be ambitious, but not if you give up before you get there! Answer to Life 1 http://hypercubics.blogspot.com/2015/09/... Answer to Life 2 http://hypercubics.blogspot.com/2015/09/... Answer to Life 3 http://hypercubics.blogspot.com/2015/09/... "The Metaphysical Art": one of my best writings on Asceticureanism: http://hypercubics.blogspot.com/2015/08/the-metaphysical-art.html My Excellent Videos on Spiritual Meaning: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X9lPrvoGr3U&list=PLcttXCrYoAgNLf93XZb2V8ykPcQirG45W
    10 answers · Philosophy · 2 years ago
  • Philosophy or Science: Which came first?

    If you believe the thought of philosophy came before the practice of science, then philosophy clearly came first. But, if you believe that theory follows from the practice of science / art or whatever is in front of you, then you have to believe that science came first, and theory later. I think it's ambiguous. It depends on the specific people... show more
    If you believe the thought of philosophy came before the practice of science, then philosophy clearly came first. But, if you believe that theory follows from the practice of science / art or whatever is in front of you, then you have to believe that science came first, and theory later. I think it's ambiguous. It depends on the specific people and civilizations involved. Sometimes it is even possible that culture discovers philosophy first, while individual people truly discover science. Pretty confusing, but there is the answer, as far as I know. It even depends on the memory of science and philosophy to determine what we THINK about which happened first. It depends on which is most important NOW, to determine how that relates to whether the past could EVEN BE important. Sometimes in history, specific philosophies and sciences (like monadology, or the Socratic method) seem more important than all others, but not ANYMORE! Now we think we're awash in an ocean of philosophies and sciences, while some of the major questions still have remained UNSOLVED (at least to majority opinion). At some time in history, perhaps every question has been solved. But how would we know? We didn't record everything! And so, I'm afraid the beginning point of science and philosophy, as we advance, has grown CLOSER AND CLOSER, to where we are living now! What was high science a century ago is now largely considered primitive. And where Aristotle was once considered The Philosopher, now people are trying to transform him into exclusively a scientist, or ignoring him altogether, as though a philosopher could never be a scientist! Largely people consider what is important to be what is related to what has happened recently. As academic climates change, sometimes new things are priceless (like Nietzsche or Post-Modernism perhaps), whereas at other times conventionality and book learning are all-important (like during the Scholastic period). But times change, and history is becoming increasingly categorical, but also sometimes, when it can be, all-embracing. The natural extension of this would be to embrace an imaginative, philosophical viewpoint in which many theories have validity, but unfortunately this ironically goes against the progress of science! So, I suppose we're still catching up with some of the insights of the early greats! Eventually we will realize that small thoughts matter a great deal.
    15 answers · Other - Education · 2 years ago
  • What is your philosophy on psychology?

    True religion is for the gods. But in psychology its different. Psychology is always about progressing to another level: "self-actualization". But if you get over-involved, if it gets too intense, then you tend to get confused and everything gets complicated. That's why my therapist advised that I don't focus on my dreams, since... show more
    True religion is for the gods. But in psychology its different. Psychology is always about progressing to another level: "self-actualization". But if you get over-involved, if it gets too intense, then you tend to get confused and everything gets complicated. That's why my therapist advised that I don't focus on my dreams, since dreams might be caused by excessive consumption of chocolate. Instead, meditate and do what you want to do, and you might achieve enlightenment and avoid the madness. A lot of psychology is group oriented, or concerns how to be a functional person when you aren't. For example, my current therapist advises that I become more sociable, but I know that isn't what I want to do. I've never had public speaking ability, and every time I have a social responsibility it seems like trauma. He doesn't know that according to Meyers-Briggs I'm almost completely an introvert. I should tell him, but because he has a social personality, he seems to think its irrelevant what the personality is. He thinks everyone needs a friend. But I don't. I'm always less impulsive and less delusional when I don't have friends. Psychology is great if you fit the bill (or foot the bill), but less so if you're just trying to cope. Maybe it's time for a form of therapy that's just about coping. Like a quotations personality matcher, or a little chocolate therapy, or an introduction to the most beautiful thing I've ever seen. Something to make life spiritual and quaint and compulsory, when compulsory means agreeable and not forced.
    10 answers · Philosophy · 2 years ago
  • How do I know you exist?

    I'll take this as a serious question. Here is a psychological approach involving "Four Strategies": 1. If I insist I'm self-aware (I do), then it poses more difficulty to prove that I'm not aware than to prove that I am aware. After all, why would I lie? And, statistically, aren't conscious people more motivated to say... show more
    I'll take this as a serious question. Here is a psychological approach involving "Four Strategies": 1. If I insist I'm self-aware (I do), then it poses more difficulty to prove that I'm not aware than to prove that I am aware. After all, why would I lie? And, statistically, aren't conscious people more motivated to say that they are conscious? Or, aren't they more convincing when they say so? 2. If I do something important, you know that the universe values me as much as you. If I'm equally valued, I might be equally conscious. 3. Even if you don't KNOW that I'm conscious, the special events that lead up to YOU being conscious (assuming you are) might just as well lead up to PEOPLE RELATED TO YOU being conscious. They're special because you're special. 4. Perhaps there is a functional reason for being conscious. What if someone needs to be conscious to prevent their limbs from going lax, and preventing them from being productive on the job, or it could prevent them from watching television, feeling weird, etc.? I mean, if they're not robots... then they might be conscious. According to these strategies, the root cause of solipsism is: (1) Over-complication, (2) Thinking other people aren't important, (3) Thinking you're different, (4) Being un-scientific. Additionally, it may help to realize the following about the internet: (1) It has some high-level controls that may prevent you from seeing exactly what you want (commercial interests, proprietary rights, etc.), (2) You may in fact be the biggest and really the only expert on getting what you want. We are motivated to find a way to make a unique contribution that we can attribute to us, so we don't always see how valuable other persons' intellectual contributions are. I hope that helps!
    43 answers · Philosophy · 2 years ago
  • How do I write a book?

    You mentioned software, so I assume you're pretty serious. I've tried publishing mainstream, and it's really difficult. I was turned down by Divine Arts Press, and received a number of other rejection letters. The books like Writer's Market tell you it's difficult, but they don't tell you it's impossible. I have some... show more
    You mentioned software, so I assume you're pretty serious. I've tried publishing mainstream, and it's really difficult. I was turned down by Divine Arts Press, and received a number of other rejection letters. The books like Writer's Market tell you it's difficult, but they don't tell you it's impossible. I have some knowledge that may motivate you: Amazon has a company called CreateSpace that's designed to reach regular Amazon readers, and you get to sell on the Amazon website with free advertising for your books from Amazon. It is free, but you may have to pay for software to create PDF images and PDF documents. The software I recommend is Microsoft Office Publisher for creating PDF documents (save as a .pub file and as PDF), and there is a free paint software called PAINT.NET by Google or Microsoft that permits saving single image files as PDF. You'll need additional information from CreateSpace to figure out the appropriate sizes of your files. Some are industry standard, and are more likely to sell copies. My experience with CreateSpace is that it is actually possible to make sales, unlike most self-publishing companies. They have a big market, and if you input keywords and descriptions and have a decent cover and adequate content, you will probably sell a few books. A few additional details: before I sold books on Amazon I started a webstie at Yahoo Small Business which helped me to advertise. This probably helped my book sales a lot. It may also be important to have a lot of friends on Facebook, or to communicate by word-of-mouth. If you follow all of these steps, and your aim is to publish more than one book, then if writing is what excites you, you will probably have a shot at it. It's still hard, but if you ignore the path of all the people trying desperately to publish mainstream, you may have a shot at being an author. If you want examples of relatively popular books from someone who self-published you can search amazon for 'createspace' or view my author profile: http://www.amazon.com/author/nathancoppe... i thought you were an expert, but if it turns out you need more basic writing advice, I have some really good advice at the following link (also on Yahoo Answers): https://ca.answers.yahoo.com/question/in... Here is a link to Paint.net, the free software for creating PDF images: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paint.NET (I thought I'd give you the most trustworthy version of the link).
    9 answers · Books & Authors · 2 years ago
  • If reality is montaged, how is it going to help you?

    I assume you mean that reality is a kind of substance that one relates to. It is granted to one's life through those nameless non-entities that live 'somewhere out there', like the government, the corporations, the oracles, the experts, etc. This conception will have no metaphysical limitations, and will work for any humanoid... show more
    I assume you mean that reality is a kind of substance that one relates to. It is granted to one's life through those nameless non-entities that live 'somewhere out there', like the government, the corporations, the oracles, the experts, etc. This conception will have no metaphysical limitations, and will work for any humanoid purpose. I'll give you some points, tech-style: *Reality will provide a logic for pleasure. *Reality will provide symbolic applications. *Reality will provide a high potential for a variety of meaningful experiences / stories / dynamics. *Reality will provide access to some higher purpose that motivates a continuous relationship with the world and other people / beings / (magical) objects. That's about it, for three or four dimensions. In higher dimensions you might need a core purpose that relates to your identity and how it experiences the variables of reality. Or, you might need a particular set of relations to particular kinds of complex localized entities and objects that define 'outer identity'. In my experience, the default option tends to be expensive education. But magic, surrealism, high art, and peaceful adventure might easily be stand-ins for education in some scenarios, provided adequate resources.
    9 answers · Philosophy · 2 years ago