• What is a symphony in classical music, and what do its different movements signify?

    Best answer: First of all 'symphony' just means 'concord of sound' so there will always be devations to what I describe below, but the symphony is a style emerging from the early 18th century and perfected by Haydn and Mozart around 1755. The Classical symphony has 4 movements, the first in sonata-allegro form. It features a full orchestra without... show more
    Best answer: First of all 'symphony' just means 'concord of sound' so there will always be devations to what I describe below, but the symphony is a style emerging from the early 18th century and perfected by Haydn and Mozart around 1755. The Classical symphony has 4 movements, the first in sonata-allegro form. It features a full orchestra without a primary soloist, though there are often short or extended solos within the context of the work. The three main composers of the Classical symphony are Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven. In general, symphonies aren't accompanied by dramas or dance. The symphony was a form of social entertainment and were meant to be performed to a large audience. And though applause was generally accepted between movements in Beethoven's time (18th and early 19th century) there were no significant breaks between movements for the performers, even though symphonies could last quite a long time! The movements in a symphony are a more in depth issue. They are generally 4 movements long. They usually are connected by a common key signature, and later ones sometimes have connecting motifs (such as the dah dah dah dahhhh in Beethoven's fifth -.-) The symphony is something much too complicated to be expressed in depth here, I'm reading a 700 page book about it by Charles Rosen right now. But in the Classical (about 18th century) period, the symphonies of importance are all by Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, and I'd suggest listening to a couple on youtube or itunes to get a sense of the form ^.^
    4 answers · Classical · 9 years ago
  • What Bach song is this?

    Best answer: This actually isn't by Bach! It's an aria known as "When I am Laid", or more famously Dido's Lament from the Opera Dido and Aeneas by Henry Purcell.
    Best answer: This actually isn't by Bach! It's an aria known as "When I am Laid", or more famously Dido's Lament from the Opera Dido and Aeneas by Henry Purcell.
    4 answers · Classical · 9 years ago
  • What is Chinua Achebe trying convey about the culture and history of the of Things Fall Apart.?

    Best answer: Well besides the fact that the Christian colonists were wrong, Achebe also blames the Igbo culture for being too stoic. The fact that Umuofia is so focused on being masculine and preserving tradition led to their collapse when faced with the british colonization. The narrator takes on a pretty neutral tone, but often describes the Igbo... show more
    Best answer: Well besides the fact that the Christian colonists were wrong, Achebe also blames the Igbo culture for being too stoic. The fact that Umuofia is so focused on being masculine and preserving tradition led to their collapse when faced with the british colonization. The narrator takes on a pretty neutral tone, but often describes the Igbo culture as having pretty gruesome and illogical customs such as killing twins. Besides, at the end of the novel, it really is the villagers themselves who drive Okonkwo to hang himself. I think that when looking at the idea of change vs. tradition in this novel, you should look at the poem by Yeats, "The Second Coming,"" which the book was named after. The Second Coming talks about the anti-christ, and contains the line "The ceremony of innocence is drowned" which indicates that ignorance is partly to blame for the eventual end of the world. Also the fact that the falcon spins so far away from the falconer that the spiral falls apart puts the blame on the falcon, and not the falconer. In both the book and the poem, the Anti-Christ/missionaries are the cause of the fright, but the anarchy begins when the society collapses from being inflexible and ignorant. But still, there is no doubt that Achebe wrote the book to antagonize the British missionaries. The Igbo culture is still rich and colorful while the British one is cold and reactionary. I think that if you consider Okonkwo to be a smaller version of Umuofia you can get a good idea of the dualism the Achebe wanted to present. Though he is the protagonist, he is still a deeply flawed character. Good luck, and I hope I helped!
    3 answers · Books & Authors · 10 years ago
  • Why is the orchestra important in today's society?

    Best answer: The orchestra is the medium that has survived the longest in all of our known civilization. It's a versatile function capable of expressing any range of emotions. Music is humanity's way of breaking the language barrier and understanding one another, and the orchestra is the lodestone in our ability to communicate. Sure,... show more
    Best answer: The orchestra is the medium that has survived the longest in all of our known civilization. It's a versatile function capable of expressing any range of emotions. Music is humanity's way of breaking the language barrier and understanding one another, and the orchestra is the lodestone in our ability to communicate. Sure, there are rock bands and jazz combos and techno computers, but none are as capable of expressing the subtleties of humanity. What is more beautiful that a Brahms symphony yet so stimulating? Or so primitive like a Stravinsky ballet but somehow so complex? Nothing else is able to express sadness, excitement, rage, confusion, beauty, silence, noise, sophistication and our carnal desires all at the same time as wonderfully as the orchestra. A group of independent men and women uniting into a single expressive unit... There is no reason to abandon something like that in our society, no matter now modern we become. The orchestra, in my opinion, is the ultimate means of expression between people of any time, place, or age. Besides possibly through books (which aren't going anywhere either) there isn't any better way that people from 500 years ago can talk to someone today than through the orchestra.
    2 answers · Performing Arts · 1 decade ago
  • "mournful day" by mozart?

    Best answer: Do you mean the Dies Irae? Translated, the first line "Dies irae, dies illa" means "Day of wrath, that mournful day." If that's what you mean, it's part of his Requiem Mass. On itunes, just search Mozart Requiem. I think the best recording on itunes is by the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields, titled... show more
    Best answer: Do you mean the Dies Irae? Translated, the first line "Dies irae, dies illa" means "Day of wrath, that mournful day." If that's what you mean, it's part of his Requiem Mass. On itunes, just search Mozart Requiem. I think the best recording on itunes is by the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields, titled "Mozart: Requiem."
    1 answer · Performing Arts · 1 decade ago
  • Classical Music For a Halloween Playlist?

    Best answer: Hey, I like the pieces you picked. They are very standard, and will never fail. Here are some more strictly 'classical' pieces that would work, some standard and some more obscure, but I think all are available on itunes- March au Supplice or March to the Scaffold from Berlioz's Symphonie Fantastique. Also, the Witches... show more
    Best answer: Hey, I like the pieces you picked. They are very standard, and will never fail. Here are some more strictly 'classical' pieces that would work, some standard and some more obscure, but I think all are available on itunes- March au Supplice or March to the Scaffold from Berlioz's Symphonie Fantastique. Also, the Witches Sabbath from the same piece. Devil Music and Danse Macabre from George Crumb's Black Angels. Kyrie, Dies Irae and/or Confutatis from Mozart's Requiem. Dies Irae from Verdi's Requiem. Infernal Dance of King Kaschei from Stravinsky's Firebird Suite The Devil's Trill (mvt. 4) by Tartini Sensemaya by Revueltas Also, you might want to try to look into Tibetan chant, it has a very ominous sound to it. There's a CD on itunes called Tibetan Master Chant, that you should look at. Good luck, and I hope you find that these pieces will work :D
    4 answers · Classical · 1 decade ago
  • What is the difference between a scherzo and a minuet?

    Best answer: A minuet was a very popular dance starting in the baroque era of music (more specifically, it originiated in the courts in France of Louis the XIV). Lully often included them in his ballets and operas. It was in 3/4 time and often placed in sonatas for instruments or for keyboards, and other suites. It became the only really important... show more
    Best answer: A minuet was a very popular dance starting in the baroque era of music (more specifically, it originiated in the courts in France of Louis the XIV). Lully often included them in his ballets and operas. It was in 3/4 time and often placed in sonatas for instruments or for keyboards, and other suites. It became the only really important dace to survive into the classical era. It became the standard third movement in a symphony or string quartet in the form known as 'minuet and trio.' Though Haydn was the first to substitute the scherzo for the minuet into his string quartetes, Beethoven prefered the scherzo to the minuet. It is faster, more robust, and the form is less strict, though it is often in triple time as well. Since Beethoven, the scherzo has become a standard third/fourth movement in symphonies and sonatas. The scherzo has also developed as an independent art thanks to Chopin. Modern examples of scherzo include Stravinsky's Scherzo a la Russe, Henri Busser's Prelude and Scherzo for flute, and a movement of Bartok's Mikrokosmos. Some modern examples of minuets include a movement of Schoenberg's Suite Fur Klavier, and a movement of Bartok's Mikrokosmos. Most of these are only included as homage, and are given the name 'minuetto' refering to the more robust Italian dance rather than the dance of the French origin.
    3 answers · Other - Arts & Humanities · 1 decade ago
  • The tone of the author in the novel "things fall apart"?

    Best answer: Ok, I had to read this book last summer and do an assignment on it for my english 11 class, and here is what I remember- The voice is third person omniscient. The story chronicles Okonkwo's tragic fall from greatness and it concentrates on the thoughts and feelings of different people in the village, or the christian... show more
    Best answer: Ok, I had to read this book last summer and do an assignment on it for my english 11 class, and here is what I remember- The voice is third person omniscient. The story chronicles Okonkwo's tragic fall from greatness and it concentrates on the thoughts and feelings of different people in the village, or the christian missionaries. the tone itself is ironic and tragic and told in a very clear and direct way as if it were a story being passed on from one to another. The tone also differs between the three parts. The first part is told very fable like and is told as if it were from the voice of the village. The tone in the first part is supported with the consant reference to beating drums, which serve as a cohesive force in the village, and the inclusion of native fables, parables, and words; all allowing for a rustic and quaint tone. The second part reveals Okonkwo's tragic flaws and weaknesses and takes a more tragic tone. This the focus on this chapter focuses more on Okonkwo's fall from greatness, and includes stories of white men destroying villages. Also, Okonkwo's disillusioned ideas of regaining his position of greatness upon return from his exile create a tone of pathos. the fable-like tone still remains, but the parables start to become integrated with stories of tragedy and the white man, as opposed to the parables told in the first part all relating to stories about family or village values. In the final part, tragic and ironic tones dominate, and the fable-like tone becomes and replaced by a factual telling of events by the very end, symbolizing the loss of a cohesive village voice. Also, if I'm not mistaken, there are no drums in this part of the story, symbolizing the 'falling apart' of the village. The tragic tone is obvious in Okonkwo's suicide, and events leading up to it. The irony (which is also tragic) is pointed both towards Okonkwo's views of self-grandeur and heighted masculinity (such good they did him, right?) and also to the closed minded christian missionaries. The final two chapters are especially important for analyzing the ironic tone. I hope this helped, I loved this book, and I think that it provides great insight into many aspects of human nature. I also suggest you try and understand the Yeats poem that Achebe drew the title from, as it gives some insight into Achebe's purpose when writing the novel. If you have any more questions feel free to email me.
    4 answers · Books & Authors · 1 decade ago
  • Help With Band!!!!!??

    Best answer: I went through the all state audition procedure a couple of times on flute and then piccolo. Just remember that the judges want you to do well. They chose to judge so that they could hear lots of talented youth. Also, don't practice too much while you're waiting to get called to play if it's not totally clean, last... show more
    Best answer: I went through the all state audition procedure a couple of times on flute and then piccolo. Just remember that the judges want you to do well. They chose to judge so that they could hear lots of talented youth. Also, don't practice too much while you're waiting to get called to play if it's not totally clean, last minute adjustments are not going to help as much as they would hurt. In 9th grade, I got so nervous and practiced so much while waiting for my number to get called that I completely bombed my audition because I was so exhausted from all the playing earlier. If you want to bring a drink, remember this- cold water makes your mouth dry, and warm water makes it wet, so if a dry mouth will upset you, don't drink ice water right before the audition. Scales are very important for all state auditions. Last year, I got a 26/30 (2nd place) for my prepared piece, 29/30 (1st place) for sightreading, and 18/20 (tied for third) for my chromatic scale. One of my scales, I got a 9/10 (tied for second) on, but the other I bombed and got a 3/10 (nearly last place) on, and I only made first alternate (4th place) piccolo. So even if everything else is very well prepared, you probably want to spend the most time on your scales. Besides, as scales are the foundation of western music, they will infinitely help your sightreading. Good luck, all-state auditions are really fun, and a terrific experience. Just remember that the judges want to hear a fantastic musician, and if you stay calm and collected, you can make them very happy.
    6 answers · Performing Arts · 1 decade ago
  • I need help with tuning alto saxophone?

    Best answer: Hi, I play sax as a secondary instrument (flute is my first) and let me start by saying that the most difficult thing about the sax, by far, is tuning it. Remember that as a general rule to make yourself sharper if you're playing flat, you push the mouthpiece in, and to make it flatter, you pull it out. First of all, the reed... show more
    Best answer: Hi, I play sax as a secondary instrument (flute is my first) and let me start by saying that the most difficult thing about the sax, by far, is tuning it. Remember that as a general rule to make yourself sharper if you're playing flat, you push the mouthpiece in, and to make it flatter, you pull it out. First of all, the reed strength is important. If you are a beginner you should start on a 2 1/2 size reed, as a harder reed will give more resistance and is more likely to play flat unless you're able to control it. Also, your embouchure (how you shape your mouth/bite your reed) is important. It's possible that you play with a too relaxes embouchure and so your music plays flat, but usually the problem for beginners is biting the reed and playing sharp. So more likely, you just need to support more. That means that you need to make sure you push your air in a steady and constant stream while pushing in on your diaphram. Think of a string slowly pulling your stomach in while you play. This would explain why you can tune the note, and then it becomes flat when you play. Supporting your music is something you will always need to be concious of as a musician. I really reccommend you get a teacher who can explain this to you in person and keep reminding you of it. Your teacher can also check for leaks (air escaping maladjusted keys) and such. I hope I helped you in some way, and good luck on the sax. It really pays off, man.
    2 answers · Performing Arts · 1 decade ago
  • Difference between playing Piccolo and Flute?

    Best answer: The piccolo is actually quite similar to the flute. Despite what others are saying, it actaully takes much much less air than the flute, but more support for high notes. The fingerings are exactly the same, but there are some alternates fingerings you would want to learn for intonation's sake. The intonation is by far the hardest... show more
    Best answer: The piccolo is actually quite similar to the flute. Despite what others are saying, it actaully takes much much less air than the flute, but more support for high notes. The fingerings are exactly the same, but there are some alternates fingerings you would want to learn for intonation's sake. The intonation is by far the hardest part about the piccolo. I have been playing it for four years now, and I'm still learning how to tune some of the trouble notes (Bb, C#, high B and C, E), But even if you don't have the best ear right now, the piccolo is a great way to train your ear and intonation since it's so obvious when it's out of tune. Most flute palyers that double in picc have different embouchures for each. the tone hole is generally slightly smaller for picc. You have to be willing to learn a new embouchure if you're going to play the picc, but it's not as hard as you think. good luck!
    8 answers · Performing Arts · 1 decade ago
  • Major in Music?

    Best answer: When you major in music, you will specify a concentration. To be a music teacher, you would major in Music Education, and if you wanted to be a performer, you would probably major in Music Performance. Other music majors are Music Theory, Composition, Music Technology, and Musicology(music history). Basically, besides music... show more
    Best answer: When you major in music, you will specify a concentration. To be a music teacher, you would major in Music Education, and if you wanted to be a performer, you would probably major in Music Performance. Other music majors are Music Theory, Composition, Music Technology, and Musicology(music history). Basically, besides music education, music isn't the most secure degree. You would basically be forced to audition into an orchestra/professional performing ensemble, freelance, or teach as a professor. If you think of it, there are really only a small handful of professional composers. As to what colleges are good, the top of the line include schools like Julliard, Curtis, Oberlin, and Eastman. Second-tier (IMO) schools that are still fantastic include NYU(Also a fantastic theatre school), Peabody, and Lawrence. But these schools can be insanely expensive, so some state schools with great music programs include, Ohio State, James Madison (in VA), Texas, and UNC-G. Also, when you apply to any of these schools, you will need to schedule an audition on your primary instrument. If you do not take private lessons now, I suggest starting immediatly! Good luck!
    6 answers · Performing Arts · 1 decade ago
  • What classical music sounds like natural disasters?

    Try something by Stravinsky- his Rite of Spring can sound like a storm or explosion. Also, a shorter Stravinsky piece that might work would be his Fireworks- it reminds me of an incoming storm building into a cloudburst. Mussorgsky's Night on Bald Mountain might be good too. If your kids have open minds George Crumb's Black Angels has... show more
    Try something by Stravinsky- his Rite of Spring can sound like a storm or explosion. Also, a shorter Stravinsky piece that might work would be his Fireworks- it reminds me of an incoming storm building into a cloudburst. Mussorgsky's Night on Bald Mountain might be good too. If your kids have open minds George Crumb's Black Angels has movements that are rather cacophonic, and Steve Reich's Triple Quartet Mvt. III sounds like a flood or earthquake. Also, Orff's Carmina Burana has several movements that could be interpreted as a natural disaster. Same with Mozart or Verdi's Requiem. I don't know of a great number of works that were originally composed to depict natural disasters, but hopefully you and your students could add some personal interpretation on these pieces; they certainly spark creative images.
    9 answers · Classical · 1 decade ago
  • How to pick a flute?

    Hi, I've been playing the flute for 6 years, and I've gone through this process twice. First of all, it is necessary to go to a store or dealer where you can try several flutes out, because no two flutes are alike, even of the same company and brand. Depending on your level, I would recommend Yamaha, or Gemeinhardt for intermediate... show more
    Hi, I've been playing the flute for 6 years, and I've gone through this process twice. First of all, it is necessary to go to a store or dealer where you can try several flutes out, because no two flutes are alike, even of the same company and brand. Depending on your level, I would recommend Yamaha, or Gemeinhardt for intermediate levels. Gemeinhardt is interesting, because the tone hole is cut differently than on other flutes, so it is a rather controversial decision, but I find that it is fine for an intermediate flutist. For advaced/professional flutes, I would reccomend Powell, Muramatsu, or Altus brand. Powell has generally become the accepted brand for the professional flutist, but I find muramatsu the be the best. Be careful if you chose muramatsu that you get one that is tuned to A=440, as it is a Japanese model and they sometiems are tuned to different frequencies. In general, features you should look out for are inline or offset G, whether it includes low B, open or closed holes, and whether it includes the split E mechanism. Inline G ve. offset G just depends on the size of oyur fingers. I have long fingers, so I play an inline G, but many flutists choose offset if they have smaller hands. Low B is nice to have, but to be honest, it rarely comes up in music and if it does, it is usually optional. Open holes are nice for a professional aesthetic and I strongly suggest you get open holes if you're intermediate or above, but there is very little difference between open and closed hole flutes in terms of tone; but open holes are sometiem required for pitch bends in more contemporary music. The split E mechanism is helpful for tuning some trouble notes but I don't use it, because I find that the added cost is not neccesary and the notes are tunable with practice. The process of trying flutes should include playing harmonics to see if the flute is in tune with itself, a slow chromatic scales to see if all the notes sound correct and as they should, and playing some melodies in the low, middle, and upper register to test the resonance. Keep in mind that 'this flute is too light/heavy' is a perfectly acceptable reason to reject a flute. I strongly suggest you bring a teacher or band director who can listen to you play the flute, and give you their input. Or if you are not quite as advanced yet, even test the flute for you. The last thing you want is to come home with a flute you don't really love. Sorry if this was longwinded or I explained things in a complicated way, but hopefully it will help a lot. Good luck, I remember how excited I was when I got my first new flute. :)
    6 answers · Performing Arts · 1 decade ago
  • Will our expectations of the year 3000 have the same fate of our past expectations of the year 2000?

    Best answer: The best way to think of this question, is thinking of what the year 1000 was like. Vikings were still exploring the world, and Leif Erikson just had discovered America. I really don't believe that they would have any feasible way of guessing the state of affairs in the world today. The same should be said about us. Our... show more
    Best answer: The best way to think of this question, is thinking of what the year 1000 was like. Vikings were still exploring the world, and Leif Erikson just had discovered America. I really don't believe that they would have any feasible way of guessing the state of affairs in the world today. The same should be said about us. Our expectations of the year two thousand with space crafts and robots were actaully relatively new speculations, less than 100 years onld for the most part. So to answer your question, our expectatons for the year 3000 will undoubtably be nothing at all like reality.
    4 answers · Other - Arts & Humanities · 1 decade ago
  • Can poetry be categorized as a performing art?

    Best answer: Back in ancient Greece poetry recitation was a competetive performance art that could earn prizes comparable to the awards won by olympic atheletes. In the 60s, beat poets performed poetry, including important authors such as Allen Ginsberg and William S. Burroughs. Today poetry recitation is a performance art in forensics teams in high... show more
    Best answer: Back in ancient Greece poetry recitation was a competetive performance art that could earn prizes comparable to the awards won by olympic atheletes. In the 60s, beat poets performed poetry, including important authors such as Allen Ginsberg and William S. Burroughs. Today poetry recitation is a performance art in forensics teams in high schools, and you'll often see poets performing in coffee shops and stuff. To me poetry recitation is like playing an instrument, where you take some ink on paper and you bring it to life so that everyone can enjoy it. I mean, writing poetry is an art as writing music is, but the oral interpretation adds a whole extra level to the experience.
    6 answers · Performing Arts · 10 years ago
  • What are the branches of western classical music?

    Well, western classical music has led to most other genres of music in at least a convoluted way. For example, music by Debussy influenced jazz quite a bit especially in terms of chords and harmonies. By by branches do you mean... minimalism, serialism, neoclassicism, primitivism, etc? Or time periods such as medieval, rennaisance, baroque,... show more
    Well, western classical music has led to most other genres of music in at least a convoluted way. For example, music by Debussy influenced jazz quite a bit especially in terms of chords and harmonies. By by branches do you mean... minimalism, serialism, neoclassicism, primitivism, etc? Or time periods such as medieval, rennaisance, baroque, classical, romantic, or 20th century?
    6 answers · Classical · 1 decade ago
  • I need military-sounding orchestral songs.?

    If you're looking for upbeat classical, my favorite is Fireworks by Stravinsky. Also, Stravinsky's Suite no. 2 for Small Orchestra has a military edge. Many of the smaller movements in the Rite of Spring by Stravinsky are very upbeat and exciting. If it has to be military-sounding, Cotege or Procession of the Nobles(same song,... show more
    If you're looking for upbeat classical, my favorite is Fireworks by Stravinsky. Also, Stravinsky's Suite no. 2 for Small Orchestra has a military edge. Many of the smaller movements in the Rite of Spring by Stravinsky are very upbeat and exciting. If it has to be military-sounding, Cotege or Procession of the Nobles(same song, different name) by Rimsky-Korsakov. Also, Farandole from L'Arlesienne suite no. 2. Try The Birth of Kije from Prokofiev's Lt. Kije Good luck.
    10 answers · Classical · 1 decade ago
  • In my English class...?

    Best answer: Hey, I have to say that it sounds like you are going to have a great year in English. The only one I haven't read is I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, but I heard it is fantastic. A Raison in the Sun is one of my favorite plays. It is about the life of a black family in Chicago. The plot revolves around an inheritance check that... show more
    Best answer: Hey, I have to say that it sounds like you are going to have a great year in English. The only one I haven't read is I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, but I heard it is fantastic. A Raison in the Sun is one of my favorite plays. It is about the life of a black family in Chicago. The plot revolves around an inheritance check that the family recieves, and how each character plans on using it to reach their dreams. It's title is from the poem A Dream Deferred by Langston Hughs. The question 'what happens to a dream deferred?' is a central question in the play. I love it! Animal Farm is a nice satire on the communist revolution in the USSR. It manages to be light in tone while remaining rather disturbing. You should like it. Lord of the Flies is one of my favorites too. It presents the conflict of a group of boys stranded on an island, and their slow loss of humanity. It has many biblical references, and some interpret it as a biblical allegory, and it certainly can be viewed as such, but it is so much deeper than that. It also draws on modern Freudian psychology, and the three main characters represent the Ego, Superego, and the Id. It's one of those books that will let you go as deep into it as you want, and you'll still have only scratched the surface. The Odyssey was not my favorite, but it made for an interesting read. It's an epic in verse on a man's travels through the sea to return home while faced with many mythological obstructions. It's not as interesting as it sounds, unfortunatly, unless you have a good imagination, as it lacks descriptions in important places, and I often found myself reading it and then thinking... 'wait, they're pigs now?' or something. Whatever, you'll enjoy it. Antigone is a great play by Sophocles. It is a tragedy about a young woman who defies the authority of the government to bury her brother who's corpse was sentenced to not be buried by her other brother... it's like an ancient soap opera, to be honest. But it presents the figure of the Tragic Hero, which is important in a literary sense. Also, Romeo and Juliet isn't bad. I hate 'romance' books, but I found that that play was really quite different. Man, I'm excited for you. Every book you're reading is fantastic. I'm going to be a senior in HS on tuesday, so I know how different Honors English 9 is from 8th grade, but your school seems to have picked an excellent agenda. Just keep a positive outlook on the book, and you will jump right into freshman year and dominate. Good luck, and feel free to email me if you have any other questions, I've analyzed all those books in some sort of depth :)
    12 answers · Books & Authors · 1 decade ago
  • I need a song for my pantomime! Please Help!?

    Best answer: don't really know much about pantomime, but some nice light classical pieces that might work are: Golliwog's Cakewalk from Debussy's Children's Corner for solo piano March from Saint-Saens' Jeux d'enfants Waltz from Stravinsky's Suite for Small Orchestra no. 2 In the Hall of the Mountain King from... show more
    Best answer: don't really know much about pantomime, but some nice light classical pieces that might work are: Golliwog's Cakewalk from Debussy's Children's Corner for solo piano March from Saint-Saens' Jeux d'enfants Waltz from Stravinsky's Suite for Small Orchestra no. 2 In the Hall of the Mountain King from Peer Gynt Suite no. 1 by Grieg Fireworks by Stravinsky Sabre Dance by Khachaturian I hope this helps some. All these pieces are pretty standard and should be on itunes
    2 answers · Theater & Acting · 1 decade ago