• I dry fired my paintball gun approx. 10 times. Is it damaged now?

    No, your paintball gun should be fine. The worst thing is that you're wasting you're co2. I've dry fired my paintball gun a lot just to scare my friends and it still works as good as new. :)
    No, your paintball gun should be fine. The worst thing is that you're wasting you're co2. I've dry fired my paintball gun a lot just to scare my friends and it still works as good as new. :)
    9 answers · Other - Outdoor Recreation · 1 decade ago
  • What is the coriolis effect made of?

    Best answer: The Coriolis effect isn't really "made" by anything. The Coriolis effect is due to the rotation of the Earth. In the Northern Hemisphere the winds are deflected to the right and in the Southern Hemisphere winds are blown to the left. An example that will help you picture why this happens is by using a merry go round. ... show more
    Best answer: The Coriolis effect isn't really "made" by anything. The Coriolis effect is due to the rotation of the Earth. In the Northern Hemisphere the winds are deflected to the right and in the Southern Hemisphere winds are blown to the left. An example that will help you picture why this happens is by using a merry go round. Sitting on a merry go round have somebody sit directly in front of you on the other side. Now spin the merry go round and try throwing a ball to the person on the other side. The ball doesn't go to the person you were trying to throw to because the merry go round (the Earth) is spinning. So the ball you throw goes in a straight line but since the merry go round is spinning, the ball will not go to the person you were trying to throw too.
    2 answers · Weather · 1 decade ago
  • How is lightning created? And thunder?

    thunder is NOT the sound of lightning hitting the ground. Lightning doesn't strike the ground. I'm assuming you aren't in meteorology courses or anything of the sort so you don't know all the "technical" jargon used for explaining how lightning occurs. So I'll try and give a simple explanation. First friction... show more
    thunder is NOT the sound of lightning hitting the ground. Lightning doesn't strike the ground. I'm assuming you aren't in meteorology courses or anything of the sort so you don't know all the "technical" jargon used for explaining how lightning occurs. So I'll try and give a simple explanation. First friction creates electrical charges. Negative charges in clouds send down what is called a "stepped leader." The positive charges on the ground send up a "streamer." When these two connect they create a channel for electricity. (they connect because positive charges are attracted to negative charges....opposites attract) Once a channel has been created, what you see is a bright return stroke that moves upward into the cloud. The lightning heats the surrounding air so the air expands creating a shock wave which is where the sound of thunder comes from.
    3 answers · Weather · 1 decade ago