• What is a normal TPR value; Physiology Question?

    Best answer: I'm working on a physiology lab right now with TPR calculations and I got answers all around .02 or .03, so I think your TPR values are pretty normal :)
    Best answer: I'm working on a physiology lab right now with TPR calculations and I got answers all around .02 or .03, so I think your TPR values are pretty normal :)
    2 answers · Biology · 8 years ago
  • Is this size to you a "fat" size?

    Best answer: okay, you've got to think first, Pac Sun jeans are made small. realistically you're probably like an 8 which I would not consider fat if you're 5'5, especially if you're athletic.
    Best answer: okay, you've got to think first, Pac Sun jeans are made small. realistically you're probably like an 8 which I would not consider fat if you're 5'5, especially if you're athletic.
    5 answers · Fashion & Accessories · 10 years ago
  • Can someone define "Platonic Ideal"?

    Best answer: This is also called a Platonic Form yes? okay. its hard to define, really. Lets start with this... all horses are, in theory, the same. they all have 4 legs, drink water, whatever, and we can identify them as horses. Plato said that a particular horse can "flow", like in time it will get old and die, but the... show more
    Best answer: This is also called a Platonic Form yes? okay. its hard to define, really. Lets start with this... all horses are, in theory, the same. they all have 4 legs, drink water, whatever, and we can identify them as horses. Plato said that a particular horse can "flow", like in time it will get old and die, but the "ideal" or "form" of Horse is eternal and immutable. OR, you might think of it in terms of cookies, yum, cookies! If you see ten gingerbread men all sitting on the counter that all look the same, you have a subconscious understanding that they came from a cookie cutter, and what that cookie cutter is like. In Plato's world, that cookie cutter in the "ideal" of a gingerbread man. I hope this helps.
    Philosophy · 10 years ago
  • How come the astronaut diden't float away if there is no gravity?

    well, you're forgetting one thing: The moon is pretty big. Therefore, it has gravity, just a lot less of it than the Earth. The force of gravity on the moon is about 1.63333 m/s, so that's why they walk so funny but don't float away. The idea of zero gravity means that there is NO force acting on the astronaut at all, which... show more
    well, you're forgetting one thing: The moon is pretty big. Therefore, it has gravity, just a lot less of it than the Earth. The force of gravity on the moon is about 1.63333 m/s, so that's why they walk so funny but don't float away. The idea of zero gravity means that there is NO force acting on the astronaut at all, which can only happen in open space (far away from the gravitational pull) or in free fall.
    11 answers · Physics · 10 years ago